c# : winform : pdf viewer : Add page number to pdf reader application software cloud html azure web page class Ron%20Aitchison%20-%20Pro%20DNS%20and%20BIND%2010%20-%20201151-part1376

CHAPTER 13 ■ ZONE FILE REFERENCE 
511
6 = DSA-NSEC3-SHA1 (RFC 5155) 
7 = RSASHA1-NSEC3-SHA1 (RFC 5155) 
8 = RSA/SHA-256 (RFC 5702) 
9 = unassigned 
10 = RSA/SHA512 (RFC 5702) 
11 = unassigned 
12 = GOST R 34.10-2001 (RFC 5933) 
13 - 122 = Currently unassigned 
123 – 251 = Reserved 
252 = Indirect (see the “Alternative Cryptographic Algorithms” section later in this chapter) 
253 = Private URI (see the “Alternative Cryptographic Algorithms” section later in this chapter) 
254 = Private OID (see the “Alternative Cryptographic Algorithms” section later in this chapter) 
255 = Reserved 
The algorithm
values 3 and 5, respectively, in the list above. However, the values 6 and 7 must be used if the signed 
zone uses NSEC3 to avoid problems with incompatibility in NSEC3-unaware DNSSEC validating 
resolvers. If NSEC3 is not being used within a zone, then the values 3 and 5 must be used. The gory 
details associated with this point are further explained in Chapter 11’s “NSEC3/Opt-Out” section. 
The key-data field is the base64 (RFC 4648) representation of the public key data. As shown in the 
example, if enclosed in the parentheses, whitespace is allowed for layout purposes. 
Note RSA-MD5 is no longer recommended due to a number of discovered weaknesses published in February 
2005. The weaknesses do not invalidate use of the algorithm. 
Delegation Signer (DS) Record 
The Delegation Signer RR is used in DNSSSEC (see Chapter 11) to create the chain of trust or authority 
from a signed parent zone to a signed child zone. The DS RR contains a hash (or digest) of a DNSKEY RR 
flags field 
value of 257), but this is not a requirement of the DNSSEC protocol. If a chain of trust is required for the 
zone sub.example.com (the child), the DS RR is added to the zone example.com (the parent) at the point of 
delegation—the NS RRs that point to sub.example.com. Both the parent and child zones must be signed. 
The DS RR is optionally generated by the dnssec-signzone utility (described in Chapter 9) and is defined 
in RFC 4034. 
DS RR Syntax 
name  ttl  class  rr  key-tag algorithm digest-type digest 
joe        IN     DS  13245  5 1  (E0B4B11D0FCE00E3F 
FA89FA873F40DC51281BF34) 
The key-tag field is generated algorithmically by the dnssec-keygen utility and identifies the 
particular DNSKEY RR at the child zone; this is required because more than one DNSKEY RR may be 
present at the child zone apex either because separate KSK and ZSKs are used or due to key-rollover 
operations. The algorithm field defines the algorithm used by the key-tag-identified DNSKEY RR at 
algorithm field of the DNSKEY RR above.  
Add page number to pdf reader - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page number to pdf in preview; add page numbers to pdf preview
Add page number to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add and remove pages from a pdf; add a page to a pdf in reader
CHAPTER 13 ■ ZONE FILE REFERENCE 
512 
The digest-type field defines the digest algorithm being used and may take one of the following
values: 
0 = Reserved 
1 = SHA-1—mandatory 
2 = SHA-256 (RFC 4509) 
3–255 = Currently unassigned 
The digest field is the base64 encoding of the digest of the KSK DNSKEY RR at the child zone.
The dnssec-signzone utility will optionally generate the DS RR with a file name of dsset-zonename; 
for example, if the zone being signed is sub.example.com, the resulting file is called dsset-
sub.example.com. 
As previously stated, the DS RR is included in the parent (signed) zone, which must then be re-
signed following its addition. The experimental DNSSEC Lookaside Validation (DLV) system provides an
alternative method of creating chains of trust using a DLV RR, which is functionally identical to the DS
RR with the exception of the RR type code. DLV is described further in Chapter 11. 
System Information (HINFO) Record 
The System Information RR allows the user to define the hardware type and operating system (OS) in use
at a host. The HINFO RR was defined in RFC 1035. For security reasons, these records are rarely used on
public servers. 
HINFO RR Syntax 
name  ttl  class   rr      hardware        OS 
IN      HINFO   PC-Intel-700mhz "Ubuntu 10.04" 
If a space exists in either the hardware or OS field, that field must be enclosed in quotes. There must be at
least one space between the hardware and OS fields. The preceding example illustrates that quotes are not
required with the hardware field—the spaces have been replaced with - (hyphen)—but are required with
the OS field, since it contains spaces within the field. No validation is performed on the field contents
other than the space rules defined previously, which means this record can be used for any purpose; for
instance, the fields could contain the name and phone number of technical support for the system. The
following example shows the use of the HINFO RR: 
; zone file fragment for example.com
$TTL 2d ; zone default = 2 days
$ORIGIN example.com. 
... 
www       IN      A      192.168.254.8 
IN     HINFO  "AMD 64 4.8GHZ 10TB" "FreeBSD 8.1" 
The preceding HINFO record is associated with www.example.com. 
Host Identity Protocol (HIP) Record 
The Host Identity Protocol (RFC 5201), which has EXPERIMENTAL status, is concerned with trying to
abstract the IP address/Name relationship by essentially creating a new namespace. In HIP, the Host
Identity (HI), roughly equivalent to a host name, is defined to be a public key; the Host Identity Tag
(HIT) is a shorter hash of the public key. An end-point (a host) may have one or more unique Host
Identities. The HI is assumed to be enduring in the HIP model (though it may change) whereas the IP
address is assumed to be ephemeral (short lived). The HI, being a public key, may be directly used with, 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
pageIndex, The page index of the PDF page that will be 0
adding page numbers to pdf; add page number to pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
If your page number is set as 1, then the two output PDF files will contains the first page and the later three pages Add necessary references:
add page numbers pdf file; add page to pdf reader
CHAPTER 13 ■ ZONE FILE REFERENCE 
513
say, IPsec’s Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) protocol. Within HIP, Host Identities may 
communicate using one or more third parties called Rendezvous Servers (RVSs). In particular, HI will do 
this when the IP address may change or is changing continuously; for example, in a mobile 
environment, the HIP uses a DNS HIP RR (defined in the EXPERIMENTAL RFC 5205) to maintain 
translation information.  
HIP RR Syntax 
name   ttl class rr  algorithm hit hi [rvs …] 
joe        IN    HIP   ( 
2                                  ; algorithm = RSA 
200100…. 1D578        ; HIT 
AwEAAbdx…. dXF5D ; HI 
rvs.example.com.)      ; optional RVS name 
The algorithm field defines the asymmetric encryption method used in the hi  field. The values are 
limited to those defined for IPSECKEY RR (described later in the chapter).  
The hit field is the hash (SHA1) of the hi field encoded in base16 (RFC 4648).  The hi field is the 
base64 (RFC 4648) encoded public key, whose format is defined by algorithm and which represents the 
Host Identity. The rvs field is optional. When present,  it is the name of a Rendezvous Server used to 
contact this HI. Multiple space separated RVSs may be defined; they are used in the order defined for 
this RR only. 
AAAA RR at the same name, as shown by the following fragment: 
; zone example.com 
… 
joe         IN    A      192.168.2.1 
IN    HIP   ( 
2                                  ; algorithm = RSA 
200100…. 1D578        ; HIT 
AwEAAbdx…. dXF5D) ; HI 
… 
In the case where an rvs field is present, an corresponding A or AAAA RR would be present at the rvs 
name, as shown in the following fragment: 
; zone example.com 
… 
joe         IN    HIP   ( 
2                                  ; algorithm = RSA 
200100…. 1D578        ; HIT 
AwEAAbdx…. dXF5D ; HI 
rvs.example.com.)      ; rvs  
… 
rvs         IN    A      192.168.2.17 
While the name of the RVS server in the above example lies within the domain (rvs.example.com), it 
could equally be an out-of-zone name such as rvs.example.net. In this case, obviously, the 
corresponding A or AAAA RR would lie in the example.net domain. 
The HIP RR is not supported by any BIND9 release version but a BIND patch to support the HIP RR 
may be obtained from openhip.cvs.sourceforge.net/openhip/patches/bind. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages Add necessary references
add page numbers to a pdf; adding page numbers to a pdf in preview
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Add necessary references: Description: Search specified string from all the PDF pages. eg: The first page is 0. 0
add page pdf reader; adding page numbers to pdf in
CHAPTER 13  ZONE FILE REFERENCE 
514 
Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Record 
The Integrated Services Digital Network RR is the equivalent of an A RR for ISDN Customer Premise 
Equipment (CPE). It associates the telephone number of the ISDN CPE to a host name. The ISDN RR has 
EXPERIMENTAL status and is defined in RFC 1183. 
ISDN RR Syntax 
name   ttl class rr  isdn-number   sa 
joe        IN    ISDN   1441115551212 001 
The isdn-number is in E.164 format (a telephone number). The telephone number is assumed to begin 
with the E.164 international dial sequence. There must be no spaces within the field. 
The sa
present, is separated from the isdn-number field by one or more spaces. If not used, it is omitted. Since 
the isdn-number is an address, not a name, there is no terminating dot. 
IPSEC Key (IPSECKEY) Record 
The IPSEC Key RR is used for storage of keys used specifically for IPSec operations. Originally, the KEY 
RR was designed to store such keys generically using an application subtype value. RFC 3445 limited the 
KEY RR to DNS security uses only. Using this new RR type means that an application that wishes to 
establish a VPN (an IPSec service) to a specific host name can query the DNS for an IPSECKEY RR with 
the host name it wishes to connect to and obtain the relevant details such as the optional gateway and 
IPSECKEY RR Syntax 
name  ttl  class   rr   prec gwt algorithm gw key-data 
joe        IN      IPSECKEY 256   1   2  192.168.2.1 ( 
AQPSKmynfzW4kyBv015MUG2DeIQ3 
Cbl+BBZH4b/0PY1kxkmvHjcZc8no 
kfzj31GajIQKY+5CptLr3buXA10h 
WqTkF7H6RfoRqXQeogmMHfpftf6z 
Mv1LyBUgia7za6ZEzOJBOztyvhjL 
742iU/TpPSEDhm2SNKLijfUppn1U 
aNvv4w==  ) 
The prec (precedence) field is used the same way as the preference field of an MX RR to define the 
order of priority. Lower numbers take the highest precedence. Values may lie in the range 0 to 255 only. 
The gwt field defines the type of gateway and may take one of the following values: 
0 = No gateway (the host supports the IPSec service directly). 
1 = An IPv4 gateway is defined; it should be used to access this host. 
2 = An IPv6 gateway is defined; it should be used to access this host. 
3 = A named host is present; it should be used to access this host. 
The algorithm field may take one of the values defined here: 
0 = No key is present. 
1 = DSA (RFC 2536). 
2 = RSA (RFC 3110). 
i
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
200F); annot.EndPoint = new PointF(300F, 400F); // add annotation to The string wil be highlighted from PDF file, 0
adding page numbers to pdf document; add page to a pdf
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. matchString, The string wil be deleted from PDF file, -. 0
add page number to pdf print; add pages to pdf document
CHAPTER 13 ■ ZONE FILE REFERENCE 
515
3–255 = Not assigned. 
The gw field defines the gateway and may be either a single . (dot) if the qwt field = 0, an IPv4 address 
if qwt = 1, an IPv6 address if qwt = 2, or a host name if qwt = 3. 
The key-data field contains the base64-encoded public key of the algorithm defined in the 
algorithm field. Where the IPsec service requires a certificate rather than a simple public key the CERT 
RR may be optionally used. 
Public Key (KEY) Record 
The Public Key RR was originally defined in RFC 2535 to be used for the storage of public keys for use by 
multiple applications such as IPSec, SSH, etc., as well as for use by DNS security methods including the 
original DNSSEC protocol. RFC 3445 limits this RR to use in DNS security operations such as DDNS and 
zone transfer due to the difficulty of querying for specific uses—DNS queries operate on the RR type 
field, whereas the application functionality was defined in the proto field (described in the upcoming 
text) and was therefore not directly obtained by a query operation. IPSec (IPSECKEY) and SSH (SSHFP) 
KEY RR Syntax 
name  ttl  class   rr     flags proto algorithm key-data 
joe        IN      KEY     256    3        5 ( 
AQPSKmynfzW4kyBv015MUG2DeIQ3 
Cbl+BBZH4b/0PY1kxkmvHjcZc8no 
kfzj31GajIQKY+5CptLr3buXA10h 
WqTkF7H6RfoRqXQeogmMHfpftf6z 
Mv1LyBUgia7za6ZEzOJBOztyvhjL 
742iU/TpPSEDhm2SNKLijfUppn1U 
aNvv4w==  ) 
The original definition of this RR was significantly reduced by RFC 3445 as noted previously. The 
definitions that follow reflect the current RFC 3445 status, and previous values where appropriate are 
also shown but noted as deprecated. The flags field consists of 16 bits in which only bit 7 is now used. In 
the textual format, this field is repr
the key is used with the SIG(0) or TKEY meta RR to secure DDNS or zone transfer operations, or 256 (bit 
7 = 1), which allows it to still be used in zone signing or verification operations (see Chapter 11) though 
functionally replaced with the DNSKEY RR in DNSSEC. All other values will be ignored by DNS systems. 
The proto field may only take the value 3, all other values being deprecated. For historical reasons, 
previous versions may still exist and are defined here for completeness: 
0 = Reserved 
1 = TLS (deprecated by RFC 3445) 
2 = E-mail (deprecated by RFC 3445) 
3 = DNSSEC (only value allowed by RFC 3445) 
4 = IPSEC (deprecated—replaced by IPSECKEY RR) 
5–255 = Reserved 
The algorithm field may take one of the following values: 
0 = Reserved 
1 = RSA-MD5—not recommended (RFC 2537) 
2 = Diffie-Hellman—optional, key only (RFC 2539) 
3 = DSA—mandatory (RFC 2536) 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Please note that, PDF page number starts from
add a page to a pdf file; add pages to pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. 0
adding pages to a pdf document in preview; add document to pdf pages
CHAPTER 13  ZONE FILE REFERENCE 
516 
4 = Elliptic curve—not currently standardized 
5 = RSA-SHA-1—mandatory (RFC 3110) 
6–251 = Available for IANA allocation 
252 = Reserved for indirect keys (see the “Alternative Cryptographic Algorithms” section later in this 
chapter) 
253 = Private URI (see the “Alternative Cryptographic Algorithms” section later in this chapter) 
254 = Private OID (see the “Alternative Cryptographic Algorithms” section later in this chapter) 
255 = Reserved 
Note The original specification of the KEY RR (RFC 2535) only allowed algorithm types 1 to 4 defined previously 
and was apparently not revised; however, the dnssec-keygen utility allows algorithm 5 to be specified. Indeed, 
this algorithm can be used in SIG(0) operations that use the KEY RR, so it’s shown in the preceding supported list. 
KEY RRs are typically generated by the dnssec-keygen utility (see Chapter 9), which creates an RR 
that may be included if appropriate (see Chapters 10 and 11), either directly in the zone file or through 
the $INCLUDE directive. 
While various RFCs limit the use of this RR type in a variety of ways, there is in principle nothing to 
stop the user from using it, and the dnssec-keygen utility that creates it, as a general-purpose public key 
RR for specialized applications such as secure e-mail where the functionality is known to the application 
and the presence of a KEY RR with the same name as, say, an RP RR could provide some unique 
functionality. 
Key Exchanger (KX) Record 
The Key Exchanger RR is provided to allow a client to query a destination host and be provided with one 
or more alternative hosts. It is primarily intended for use in secure operations such as creation of an 
IPSec VPN or similar service, though its applicability is much wider. The destination host may not be 
capable of providing the particular service, but in its corresponding KX RR it can nominate another host 
that will support the service such as a secure gateway or router, which can be used to route packets to 
the target host. The IPSECKEY RR replaces many of the functions of this RR type for the particular 
example described in the defining RFC. The KX RR is defined in RFC 2230. 
KX RR Syntax 
name  ttl  class   rr     preference alt-host 
joe        IN      KX     2    rt1.example.com. 
The preference field has exactly the same meaning and use as in the MX RR. It may take a value in the 
range 0 to 65535, with lower values being the most preferred. The alt-host field defines the host name 
where a VPN or some other service may be obtained for the current host. 
Location (LOC) Record 
The Location RR allows the definition of geographic positioning information associated with a host or 
service name. The LOC RR allows longitude, latitude, and altitude to be defined using the WGS-1984 
CHAPTER 13 ■ ZONE FILE REFERENCE 
517
(NAD-83) coordinate system—a US DoD standard for the definition of geographic coordinates. The LOC 
RR, which is experimental, was defined in RFC 1876 and was widely deployed, for instance, to allow 
geographic analysis of Internet backbones. Due to increased security concerns, LOC RRs are becoming 
significantly less common. The LOC RR can take a large number of parameters and most often uses the 
standard parentheses framing to allow them to be written on more than one line for clarity, as shown in 
the following text. Location data may be acquired using GPS equipment or from a number of websites 
(to varying degrees of accuracy) such as GEOnet Names Server (GNS—http://earth-
info.nga.mil/gns/html/index.html), US Geological Survey’s Geographic Names Information System 
(GNIS—http://geonames.usgs.gov), or the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names Online 
(www.getty.edu/research/conducting_research/vocabularies/tgn/). 
LOC RR Syntax 
name  ttl  class   rr  ( 
lat-d 
[lat-m [lat-s]] 
n-s 
long-d 
[long-m [long-s]] 
e-w 
alt["m"] 
[size["m"] [hp["m"] [vp["m"]]]] 
The lat-d field defines the location latitude in degrees. lat-m and lat-s are optional fields defining the 
minutes (lat-m) and seconds (lat-s) and, if omitted, default to zero. The field n-s is mandatory and can 
take the value N (north) or S (south). 
The long-d field defines the location longitude in degrees. long-m and long-s are optional fields 
defining the minutes (long-m) and seconds (long-s) and, if omitted, default to zero. The field e-w is 
mandatory and can take the value E (east) or W (west). 
The alt field defines the location altitude and can be either positive or negative in the range -
100000.00 to 42849672.95 meters. 
The size field is optional and is the diameter of the circle that encompasses the location; it 
represents the positional accuracy. If omitted, 1m is assumed. 
The hp field is the optional horizontal accuracy and defaults to 10,000m (meters). The vp field is the 
vertical accuracy and, if omitted, defaults to 10m (meters). The defaults selected in these two parameters 
represent the typical size of zip/postal code data. 
Note The datum (base reference) used by the LOC record is WSG-1984 or NAD-83 (North American Datum) used 
by the GPS system. In some cases, geographic data uses NAD-27 as the datum, which is not the same—always 
verify the datum being used. Geographic data can be presented in decimal degrees. To convert decimal degrees to 
minutes and seconds, multiply the fractional part by 60 to get minutes and fractional minutes, and then multiply 
the fractional minutes by 60 to get seconds and fractional seconds. 
CHAPTER 13  ZONE FILE REFERENCE 
518 
The LOC record can be associated with any host or the domain. The following shows individual LOC 
RR examples using published records or publicly available data from the preceding sources and 
including a number of formats: 
; Stamford, CT, US - Harbor Lighthouse 
IN   LOC  41 00 48 N 73 32 21 W 10m 
; Kilmarnock, Scotland UK 
IN   LOC  ( 
55 ;latitude 
38 ; seconds omitted 
4 32 W ; longitude 
100m  ; altitude - pure guess 
The example RRs were created using random locations from the databases referenced previously. 
There are, as far as the author knows, no registered domains for either the Stamford Harbor Lighthouse 
or the town of Kilmarnock in Scotland, nor does either entity publish a LOC RR! The preceding databases 
level, the height of the town of Kilmarnock is entirely fictitious. The required accuracy of the data will 
depend on the reason for publishing an LOC RR, and in many cases, the longitude and latitude may 
suffice to give location data. 
Mailbox (MB) Record 
The Mailbox RR defines the location of a given domain e-mail address. The MB RR has EXPERIMENTAL 
status and is defined in RFC 1035. The MB record is not widely deployed; the MX RR is the dominant 
mail record. 
MB RR Syntax 
name   ttl class rr  mailbox-host 
joe        IN    MB  fred.example.com. 
The mailbox-host field defines the host where the mailbox is located. The mailbox-host must have a 
valid A RR. The name field is the mailbox name written in the standard DNS format for mailboxes: the first 
. (dot) is replaced with an @ (commercial at sign) when constructing the e-mail address. The example 
fragment that follows illustrates that the mailbox for the domain administrator, 
hostmaster.example.com. (defined in the SOA record), is located on the host bill.example.com, whereas 
the normal mail host is mail.example.com. The mail address, when constructed, is the normal RFC 822 
format, which is hostmaster@example.com in the following example: 
; zone file fragment for example.com 
$TTL 2d ; zone TTL default = 2 days or 172800 seconds 
$ORIGIN example.com. 
example.com. IN       SOA   ns1.example.com. hostmaster.example.com. ( 
2010121500 ; serial number 
3h         ; refresh =  3 hours 
15M        ; refresh retry = 15 minutes 
3W12h      ; expiry = 3 weeks + 12 hours 
2h20M      ; nx = 2 hours + 20 minutes 
IN  MX     10  mail.example.com. 
CHAPTER 13 ■ ZONE FILE REFERENCE 
519
hostmaster    IN  MB         bill.example.com. 
bill          IN  A          192.168.254.2 
mail          IN  A          192.168.254.3 
.... 
This example requires the mail system to look for an appropriate MB record—almost none do. Most 
mail software looks for the presence of an MX RR and delivers mail to this specified host, which is  
mail.example.com in this fragment. To achieve the same result in the preceding case, the mail system at 
mail.example.com would be configured to forward mail to the mailbox hostmaster on the host 
bill.example.com. 
Mail Group (MG) Record 
RR has EXPERIMENTAL status and is defined in RFC 1035.The MG record is not widely deployed; the MX 
RR is the dominant mail record. 
MG RR Syntax 
name   ttl class rr  mailbox-name 
admins     IN    MG  fred.example.com. 
The mailbox-name field defines the mailbox names that are part of the mail group. Mail sent to the group 
will be sent to each mailbox in the group. Each member of the mail group must be defined using an MB 
RR. The mailbox-name field is written in the standard DNS format for mailboxes, that is, the first . (dot) is 
replaced with an @ (commercial at sign) when constructing the e-mail address. The following fragment 
illustrates that the mailbox for the domain administrator, hostmaster.example.com. (defined in the SOA 
record), is a mail group and will cause mail to be sent to phil.example.com (phil@example.com) and 
sheila.example.com (sheila@example.com), both of whose MB RRs define the final destination for the 
mail: 
; zone file fragment for example.com 
$TTL 2d ; zone TTL default = 2 days or 172800 seconds 
$ORIGIN example.com. 
example.com. IN       SOA   ns1.example.com. hostmaster.example.com. ( 
2010121500 ; serial number 
3h         ; refresh =  3 hours 
15M        ; refresh retry = 15 minutes 
3W12h      ; expiry = 3 weeks + 12 hours 
2h20M      ; nx = 2 hours + 20 minutes 
IN  MX     10  mail.example.com. 
hostmaster    IN  MG         phil.example.com. 
IN  MG         sheila.example.com. 
phil          IN  MB         bill.example.com. 
sheila        IN  MB         pc.example.com. 
.... 
pc            IN  A          192.168.254.4 
bill          IN  A          192.168.254.2 
mail          IN  A          192.168.254.3 
.... 
CHAPTER 13  ZONE FILE REFERENCE 
520 
This example needs the mail system to look for appropriate MG and MB RRs—almost none do. Most 
mail software looks for the presence of an MX RR and delivers mail to this specified host, which is 
mail.example.com in this fragment. To achieve the same result in this case, the mail system at 
mail.example.com would have to be configured to forward mail for the mailbox hostmaster to both 
phil@example.com and sheila@example.com. 
Mailbox Renamed (MR) Record 
The Mailbox Renamed RR allows a mailbox name to be aliased (or forwarded) to another mailbox name. 
The MR RR has EXPERIMENTAL status and is defined in RFC 1035.The MB record is not widely 
deployed; the MX RR is the dominant mail record. 
MR RR Syntax 
name   ttl class rr  real-mailbox 
joe        IN    MR  fred.example.com. 
The real-mailbox field defines the aliased, or real, mailbox that must be defined with an MB RR. Mail 
sent to name will be forwarded to real-mailbox. The name and real-mailbox fields are the mailbox names 
written in the standard DNS format for mailboxes: the first . (dot) is replaced with an @ (commercial at 
sign) when constructing the e-mail address. The following fragment illustrates that the mailbox for the 
domain administrator, hostmaster.example.com. (defined in the SOA record), is forwarded to 
phil.example.com, located on the host bill.example.com, whereas the normal mail host is 
mail.example.com. The mail address when constructed is the normal format, which is 
hostmaster@example.com in the following example: 
; zone file fragment for example.com 
$TTL 2d ; zone TTL default = 2 days or 172800 seconds 
$ORIGIN example.com. 
example.com. IN       SOA   ns1.example.com. hostmaster.example.com. ( 
2010121500 ; serial number 
3h         ; refresh =  3 hours 
15M        ; refresh retry = 15 minutes 
3W12h      ; expiry = 3 weeks + 12 hours 
2h20M      ; nx = 2 hours + 20 minutes 
IN  MX     10  mail.example.com. 
hostmaster    IN  MR         phil.example.com. 
phil          IN  MB         bill.example.com. 
.... 
bill          IN  A          192.168.254.2 
mail          IN  A          192.168.254.3 
.... 
This example needs the mail system to look for both MR and MB RRs—almost none do. Most mail 
software looks for the presence of an MX RR and delivers mail to this specified host, which is  
mail.example.com in this fragment. To achieve the same result in this case, the mail system at 
mail.example.com will be configured to forward mail for the mailbox hostmaster@example.com to 
phil@example.com on the host bill.example.com. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested