c# : winform : pdf viewer : Add page number pdf control software system web page winforms wpf console Ron%20Aitchison%20-%20Pro%20DNS%20and%20BIND%2010%20-%20201159-part1384

CHAPTER 15 ■ DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
593
Table 15–1. DNS Message Format 
Section 
Meaning/Use 
Section 1 
Message header 
Section 2 
The QUESTION SECTION: the DNS query for which a response is being sought 
Section 3 
The ANSWER SECTION: the resource record(s) that answer the question 
Section 4 
The AUTHORITY SECTION: the resource record(s) that point to the domain authority 
Section 5 
The ADDITIONAL SECTION: the resource record(s) that may hold additional 
information 
chapter covers next. 
DNS Message Header 
The message header is present in all messages. It contains various flags and values that control the 
transaction. Figure 15–3 shows the format of the message header and uses the standard IETF bit 
numbering convention throughout. 
Figure 15–3. DNS message header
Table 15–2 defines the field values listed in Figure 15–3. 
QR
OPCODE
AA TC C RD RA A res s AD D CD
RCODE
Message ID
QDCOUNT
ANCOUNT
NSCOUNT
ARCOUNT
Add page number pdf - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page to pdf online; adding a page to a pdf document
Add page number pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page to a pdf; add page numbers to pdf files
CHAPTER 15 ■ DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
594 
Table 15–2. DNS Message Header Values 
Section 
Bits Explanation 
Message ID 
16 
The message ID supplied by the requestor (the questioner) and reflected back
unchanged by the responder (answerer). Identifies the transaction. Appears as a
value of 055e in Figures 15–1 and 15–2. 
QR 
Query-Response bit. Set to 0 by the questioner (query) and to 1 in the response
(answer). Not set in Figure 15–1 and set in Figure 15–2. 
OPCODE 
Identifies the request/operation type. Currently assigned values are  
0 = QUERY. Standard query. 
1 = IQUERY. Inverse query. Made obsolete by RFC 3425. 
2 = STATUS. DNS status request. 
3 = NSID Request (RFC 5001). 
4 = NOTIFY
5 = DDNS update. 
615 = Unused. Available for assignment. 
In a response, this field reflects the user’s request. In Figures 15–1 and 15–2, this
field is 0 (a query). 
AA 
Authoritative Answer. Valid in responses only. Set if the response was received
from a zone master or slave. It is also set the first time the response is received
from a master or slave by a resolver (caching name server), but when
subsequently read from the cache the AA bit is not set. Because of aliases
(CNAME RRs), multiple owner names may exist, so the AA bit corresponds to
the name in the ANSWER SECTION that matches the query name. Set in Figure 15–2
to indicate an authoritative response. 
TC 
Truncation. Specifies that this message was truncated due to length greater than
that permitted on the transmission channel. Set on all truncated messages
except the last one. Not set in Figures 15–1 or 15–3. 
RD 
Recursion Desired. This bit may be set in a query and is copied into the
response if recursion is supported. If rejected, the response (answer) does not
have this bit set. Recursive query support is optional. Set in Figures 15–1 and 15–
2. 
RA 
Recursion Available. This bit is valid in a response (answer) and denotes
whether recursive query support is available (1) or not (0) in the name server. Set
in Figure 15–2. 
res 
Reserved by IANA for future use. 
AD 
Authenticated Data. Used by DNSSEC. Indicates that the data was reliably
authenticated. A chain of trust was verified (see Chapter 11). Not set in Figures
15–1 or 15–2, and since the target server used in the example was a security-
aware name server, it means the zone was not signed. 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
pageIndex, The page index of the PDF page that will be 0
add and remove pages from pdf file online; add pages to pdf file
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
If your page number is set as 1, then the two output PDF files will contains the first page and the later three pages Add necessary references:
add page pdf; add page to pdf without acrobat
CHAPTER 15 ■ DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
595
Section 
Bits Explanation 
CD 
Checking Disabled. Used by DNSSEC. If set, it means the initiator of the request 
(either a server or a resolver) will take responsibility for all security processing. It 
disables DNSSEC validation at the receiving name server, which will simply pass 
back all the necessary information such as RRSIG and DNSKEY RRs to the 
resolver to allow it to perform the transaction validation. 
RCODE 
assigned values include the following: 
0 = NOERR. No error condition. 
1 = FORMERR. Format error. The name server was unable to interpret the query. 
2 = SERVFAIL
the current configuration. 
3 = NXDOMAIN. Name error. Meaningful only for responses from an authoritative name 
server, this code signifies that the domain name referenced in the query does not 
nx (min) value of the SAO RR for the zone. 
4 = NOTIMP. Not implemented (versions of BIND prior to 9.3 would respond with 
NOTIMPL). The name server does not support the requested operation. 
5 = REFUSED. The name server refuses to perform the specified operation for policy 
reasons. For example, a name server may not wish to provide the information to the 
operation such as a zone transfer for a particular zone. 
6 = YXDomain. Name exists when it should not (RFC 2136). 
7 = YXRRSet. RR set exists when it should not (RFC 2136). 
8 = NXRRSet. RR set that should exist does not (RFC 2136). 
9 = NotAuth. Server not authoritative for zone (RFC 2136). 
10 = NotZone. Name not contained in zone (RFC 2136). 
11–15 = Unused. Available for assignment. Extended RCODE values with EDNS0 only 
(see the “EDNS0 Transactions” section later in this chapter): 
16 = BADVERS. Bad OPT version number (not 0) (RFC 2671). 
16 = BADSIG. TSIG signature failure (RFC 2845). 
17 = BADKEY. Key not recognized. (RFC 2845). 
18 = BADTIME. Signature out-of-time window (RFC 2845). 
19 = BADMODE. Bad TKEY mode (RFC 2930) or invalid key name. 
20 = BADNAME. Duplicate key name (RFC 2930). 
21 = BADALG. Algorithm not supported (RFC 2930). 
22–3840 = Not used. Available for assignment. 
3841–4095 = Private use. 
4096–65535 = Not used and available for assignment. 
The RCODE is 0 (NOERR) in Figure 15–2. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages Add necessary references
add page numbers to a pdf; add page numbers to pdf in reader
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Add necessary references: Description: Search specified string from all the PDF pages. eg: The first page is 0. 0
add page numbers to a pdf document; adding a page to a pdf in preview
CHAPTER 15  DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
596 
Section 
Bits Explanation 
QDCOUNT 
16 
Defines the number of entries in the QUESTION SECTION. This field is 1 in Figures 
15–1 and 15–2. 
ANCOUNT 
16 
Defines the number of resource records in the ANSWER SECTION. May be 0, in 
which case no answer records are present in the message. This field is 0 in 
Figure 15–1 and 6 in Figure 15–2. 
NSCOUNT 
16 
Defines the number of resource records in the AUTHORITY SECTION. May be 0, in 
0 in 
Figure 15–1 and 2 in Figure 15–2. 
ARCOUNT 
16 
Defines the number of resource records in the ADDITIONAL SECTION. May be 0, in 
0 in 
Figure 15–1 and 1 in Figure 15–2. 
DNS QUESTION SECTION
It is permissible to have only one question per message (defined by QDCOUNT earlier). A question has 
the generic format defined in Table 15–3. 
Table 15–3. DNS QUESTION Format 
Field Name 
Meaning/Use 
QNAME 
The domain name being queried such as www.example.com
QTYPE 
The RR type being requested. Values are defined by IANA 
(www.iana.org/assignments/dns-parameters) such as A, ANY, or NAPTR. 
QCLASS 
The RR class being requested; for instance, Internet, CHAOS, etc. 
Figure 15–4 shows the highlighted QUESTION SECTION. 
Figure 15–4. QUESTION section
Each field has the format defined in Table 15–4. 
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. matchString, The string wil be deleted from PDF file, -. 0
add pages to pdf document; add a page to a pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
200F); annot.EndPoint = new PointF(300F, 400F); // add annotation to The string wil be highlighted from PDF file, 0
adding page numbers pdf file; add a page to a pdf document
CHAPTER 15 ■ DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
597
Table 15–4. DNS QUESTION Fields 
Name 
Explanation 
QNAME 
Defines the name being queried. The name being queried is split into labels by removing 
the separating dots. Each label is represented as a length (one octet) followed by a 
variable number of characters—the label string—defined by length: 
length: A single octet defining the number of characters in the label that follows. The top 
2 bits of this number must be 00 (to indicate the label format is being used), which gives a 
maximum label name length of 63 bytes (octets). A value of 0 indicates the end of the name 
field. 
label string
name is comprised of three labels, with lengths 3, 7, and 3, respectively, terminated with a 
00 value, as shown here: 
03 77 77 77 07 65 78 61 6D 70 6D 65 03 63 6F 6D 00 
w  w  w     e  x  a  m  p  l  e     c  o  m 
The final 00 (a zero label length) indicates the end of the name. 
QTYPE 
Unsigned 16-bit value. The RR type being requested. These values are assigned by IANA 
(www.iana.org/assignments/dns-parameters). The values are also listed in Chapter 13, Table 
13-1. In Figures 15–1 and 15–2, the value is 1 (indicating an A RR). 
QCLASS 
Unsigned 16-bit value. The class of resource records being requested; for instance, 
Internet, CHAOS, etc. These values are assigned by IANA. The currently assigned values 
are: 
1 = IN or Internet 
2 = Obsolete 
3 = CH (CHAOS) 
4 = HS (HESIOD) 
In Figures 15–1 and 15–2, this value is 1 (Internet). 
DNS
ANSWER
AUTHORITY
,
and ADDITIONAL SECTION
The ANSWER, AUTHORITY, and ADDITIONAL SECTIONs contain RR records that all share the same format. 
Which section the RR appears in is determined solely by the count of records in each section that is 
contained in the message header. Thus, an A RR can appear in an ANSWER or an ADDITIONAL SECTION. So 
far, this stuff has been relatively straightforward if slightly messy—take a deep breath before reading on. 
The generic binary, or wire format, of all RRs is shown in Table 15–5. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with Other SDKs. Please note that, PDF page number starts from 0.
adding page numbers to a pdf in preview; add page to pdf preview
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. 0
add or remove pages from pdf; add multi page pdf to word document
CHAPTER 15  DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
598 
Table 15–5. ANSWER, AUTHORITY, and ADDITIONAL SECTION RR Format 
Field Name 
Explanation 
NAME 
The name being returned; for instance www or ns2.example.net. If the name is in the same 
domain as the question, then typically only the host part (label) is returned and a pointer 
record used to construct an FQDN; if not, then an FQDN is present. This process is 
described and illustrated later in this section. 
TYPE 
The RR type being returned; for instance, NS or AAAA. 
CLASS 
The RR class being returned; for instance, Internet, CHAOS, etc. 
TTL 
The TTL of the RR being returned in seconds; for instance, 2800. 
RDLENGTH 
The length in octets of the RDATA field being returned. 
RDATA 
The RR-specific data length defined by RDLENGTH; for instance, 192.168.254.2. 
Field Format 
The NAME field, including those with individual labels in Internationalized Domain Name for Applications 
(IDNA) ACE (ASCII Compatible Encoding - see Chapter 13), takes one of three formats depending on the 
value of the top 2 bits. Table 15–6 shows the meaning and layout of the three types based on the value of 
the top 2 bits. 
Table 15–6. NAME Field Format 
Value 
Size of Field 
Explanation 
00 
This indicates the label format described for the QUESTION SECTION earlier 
low 6 bits of each octet (see Figure 15–4. The sequence is always terminated 
with a zero length value. The remaining fields of this record format are 
defined in Table 15–7. 
11 
14 
The pointer format. The following 14 bits are assumed to be the offset from 
the start of the message of a name that must be in standard label format. 
Figure 15–5 shows a highlighted ANSWER SECTION commencing with a pointer 
format with an offset of x0c (12 octets) into the message that points to the 
label record for www.example.com. The remaining fields of this record format 
are defined in Table 15–7. 
01 
This denotes an EDNS0 format message (RFC 2671). The low order 6 bits of 
this field contains an extended TYPE field that, together with the rest of the 
record format, is described in the “EDNS0 Transactions” section. 
CHAPTER 15 ■ DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
599
The format of the subsequent data is determined by the top 2 bits and is described next for non-
EDNS0 values (top 2 bits either 00 or 11) and EDNS0 format data (top 2 bits are 01). 
Figure 15–5. Highlighted ANSWER SECTION
Non-EDNS0 Record Format 
The format of a non-EDNS response record—one that has the top 2 bits set to either 00 or 11—is 
described in Table 15–7. 
Table 15–7. Non-EDNS Record Format 
Name 
Explanation 
TYPE 
Unsigned 16-bit value. The RR type that determines the content of the RDATA field (see RDATA 
entry). These values are assigned by IANA (www.iana.org/assignments/dns-parameters). In 
Figure 15–5, the highlighted record has a value of 00 01 = A type RR. 
CLASS 
Unsigned 16-bit value. The class of RR; for instance, Internet, CHAOS, etc. These values 
are assigned by IANA. In Figure 15–5, the highlighted record has a value of 00 01 = 
Internet class. 
TTL 
Unsigned 32-bit value. The time in seconds that the record may be cached. A value of 0 
indicates the record should not be cached. In Figure 15–5, the highlighted record has a 
value of 00 01 51 80 (hex) = 86,400 seconds (2 days). 
RDLENGTH 
Unsigned 16-bit value that defines the length in bytes (octets) of the RDATA record. In 
Figure 15–5, the highlighted record has a value of 00 04, meaning the following record 
has a length of 4 octets. 
RDATA 
Each RR type has a specific RDATA format, whose length is defined by RDLENGTH, which 
is defined in the “DNS Binary RR Format” section later in this chapter. In Figure 15–5, 
the highlighted record has a value of 0a 01 02 01 (hex) = 10.1.2.1. Since this is an A RR, it 
defines a 4-octet (32-bit) IPv4 address. 
CHAPTER 15  DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
600 
All records create FQDNs, sometimes using chained (pointer) constructs to minimize the amount of 
data returned. Figure 15–6 shows a highlighted additional section containing an A RR. 
Figure 15–6. A RR using chained pointers
The preceding record (highlighted in gray) starts with a pointer format (top 2 bits are 11) containing 
an offset of 00 aa (decimal 170) that points to a label name type containing 03 6e 73 31 (for ns1), which 
is followed by a pointer type (c0 10) with offset of 00 10 (decimal 16), which in turn points to 
example.com. The last label in the chain is zero length, which stops the label generation phase. The 
record contains type = 00 01 (A), class = 00 01 (IN), ttl = 00 01 51 80 (28,600 seconds—2 days), an 
RDLENGTH of 00 04 octets, and RDATA of c0 a8 02 06, which being an A RR represents an IP of 192.168.2.6, 
resulting in the A RR that follows: 
ns1.example.com.  28600  IN  A   192.168.2.6 
This is the A RR in the ADDITIONAL SECTION of the dig result shown in the “DNS Message Overview” 
section earlier. 
EDNS0 Transactions 
EDNS0 is normally used only in security transactions, but it can be forced by defining a server clause 
with the statement edns yes; in BIND’s named.conf file (see Chapter 12).  Since BIND 9.5+ DNSSEC is 
now turned on by default, so unless action is taken (dnssec-enable no;), EDNS0 is the normal wire 
format used by BIND 9. The server will advertise its ability to participate in EDNS transactions by 
sending an OPT pseudo RR in the ADDITIONAL SECTION field of a query but is displayed by dig under the 
title OPT PSEUDOSECTION (see the “Verifying the Signed Zone” section of Chapter 11 for an example). If the 
receiving server can’t support such a service or does not recognize the OPT RR, it will respond with a 
failure in the RCODE field of the message header (NOTIMP, FORMERR, or SERVFAIL). In this case, the initiating 
server may continue without using EDNS services. Figure 15–7 shows the original dig command 
(presented earlier in Figure 15–1) after the server was configured to use EDNS services through the use of 
the following named.conf fragment: 
// named.conf fragment 
options { 
.... 
forward only; 
forwarders {192.168.2.3;}; 
}; 
CHAPTER 15 ■ DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
601
server 192.168.2.3 { 
edns yes; 
}; 
.... 
The captured query packet is shown in Figure 15–7. 
Figure 15–7. EDNS0 query
The query differs from that shown in Figure 15–1 by having a count of 1 in the ADDITIONAL SECTION of 
the message header and contains an OPT pseudo RR whose format is defined in Table 15–8. 
The corresponding response packet also contains an OPT pseudo RR, as shown in Figure 15–8. 
Figure 15–8. EDNS0 response message
The number of ADDITIONAL SECTION records is now 2 (it is 1 in Figure 15–2) and the OPT pseudo RR 
is present as highlighted. Rather than modifying the named.conf file, the same result may be obtained 
using the dig command with the option +dnssec, which turns on DNSSEC services that always use the 
EDNS0 service: 
dig @192.168.235.2 www.example.com A +dnssec 
OPT Pseudo RR Format 
The OPT pseudo RR is created dynamically by the server and does not appear in a zone file. Its format 
uses the standard RR format defined in Table 15–5 but redefines the use of each field, as shown in Table 
15–8. 
CHAPTER 15  DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
602 
Table 15–8. OPT RR Format 
Field Name Explanation 
NAME 
Always 00 (root). 
TYPE 
16 bits unsigned. The OPT RR type = 29 (41 decimal) in Figures 15–7 and 15–8. 
CLASS 
(Figures 15–7 and 15–8 both show 10 00 = 4096 decimal). 
TTL 
32 bits unsigned. This field is laid out as follows:  
Field 1: 8 bits unsigned. Extended RCODE (values defined in Table 15–2 earlier). 
Field 2: 8 bits unsigned. Version (must be 0). 
Field3: 16 bits unsigned. Flags as shown here: 
Bit 0 = DO (DNSSEC OK). 
Bits 1–15 = Unused. 
RDLENGTH 
The length in octets of the RDATA field being returned. 
RDATA 
The RDATA may be used to carry any number of extended optional data sets, each of 
which has the following format:  
Field 1: 16 bits unsigned. OPTION-CODE (none currently assigned). 
Field 2: 16 bits unsigned. OPTION-LENGTH. Length in octets of option data. 
Field 3: Option data. Length defined by OPTION-LENGTH and format defined by 
OPTION-CODE. 
EDNS0 allows for extended label formats by setting the top 2 bits of the NAME field (see Table 15–6) to 
the value 01. The low 6 bits of this field contain an extended label code. The binary or bit label type 
(defined in RFC 2673 and discussed in Chapter 13) uses an extended label code value of 1 (binary 00 
0001). This label type was changed to experimental status by RFC 3363 and is not discussed further. The 
value 63 (binary 11 1111) has been reserved for further extensions to the EDNS format. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested