c# : winform : pdf viewer : Add a page to a pdf document control software platform web page windows wpf web browser Ron%20Aitchison%20-%20Pro%20DNS%20and%20BIND%2010%20-%20201161-part1387

CHAPTER 15 ■ DNS MESSAGES AND RECORDS 
613
The hexadecimal representation of Field 2 only of this RR is  
00 06 40 00 00 08 00 03 
where the first 00 is the window (window 0 covering RR types 0 to 255). The length is 06, indicating that 
only 6 octets (of the possible 32) are present. The first octet of the bitmap represents RR types from 0 to 7 
and is 40
and is 08, indicating type 28 (bit 28) is present (an AAAA RR). Similarly, the RRSIG and NSEC RRs occupy 
the relevant bit positions in the sixth octet, which describes types 40 to 47. Since this is the last RR type 
in this record, all other values are omitted.  
The next example shows a more complex type using the user-defined RR syntax described in 
Chapter 14 to define a TYPE517 RR: 
bill     IN    NSEC  next.example.com (A AAAA RRSIG NSEC TYPE517) 
00 06 40 00 00 08 00 03 
02 01 04 
The first line is the same as the previous example and is not described further. The second line 
indicates window 2 (RRs from 512 to 767). Window 1 has no entries and has been omitted. The length 
value is 01
517 set—indicating the TYPE517 RR. 
Summary 
This chapter described the protocol messages that pass between DNS servers; this is sometimes called 
the wire format. In most cases the message, or wire, format can be interpreted using a packet sniffer; 
there are times, however, when even the best tools either don’t support the latest version or provide less-
than-complete interpretation so the user has to resort to trusted manual methods. Each message has the 
same format consisting of a message header followed by QUESTION, ANSWER, AUTHORITY, and ADDITIONAL 
SECTIONs. EDNS0 message formats add further complexity to the wire format and are used with security 
transactions such as TSIG, SIG(0), TKEY, and DNSSEC. 
Add a page to a pdf document - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page number pdf; adding page to pdf
Add a page to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page numbers to pdf reader; add pages to pdf acrobat
P A R T   V 
■ ■ ■ 
Appendixes 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
adding page numbers pdf; add page to existing pdf file
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in C#.NET class application?
add page number to pdf print; add pages to an existing pdf
A P P E N D I X   A 
■ ■ ■ 
617
DNS Registration and Governance 
In order to use a domain name, it must be registered. Where and how it is registered depends on the top-
level domain (TLD). For instance, in example.com, .com is the TLD. To those of a particular disposition, 
the topic of DNS governance (who controls what) is always endlessly fascinating, but under certain 
circumstances, it can provide essential background. The following information may be useful when 
registering or planning to register domain names and is presented in the form of frequently asked 
questions (FAQs). 
1. What is a domain name? 
2. What is a TLD (or gTLD or ccTLD or sTLD) domain name? 
3. Who is responsible for domain names? 
4. What TLDs are available? 
5. I thought www.example.com was my domain name. 
6. What is a URL (or URI or URN)? 
7. What is an SLD? 
8. How do I register a .com or .org or .net domain name? 
9. How do I register a domain in Malaysia (or any other country)? 
10. Can I register my domain name in any country? 
11. How do I register a US (.us) or state (for instance, ny.us) domain name? 
12. How do I register a Canadian (.ca) or provincial (for instance, bc.ca) domain 
name? 
13. If I register a .com, do I automatically register in every country? 
14. What happens when I register a domain name? 
15. What do the primary and secondary DNS server names do and why are they 
necessary? 
16. How do I change my domain name information? 
17. How do I register an .edu (or .mil or .gov or .int) name? 
18. How do I check my (or some else’s) registration information? 
19. What is IANA and how does it relate to ICANN and the IETF? 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings. On this page, we will talk about how to achieve this via Add necessary references
add a page to pdf file; add page numbers to pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
This .NET PDF Document Add-On integrates mature PDF document page processing functions, including extracting one or more page(s) from PDF document.
adding page numbers in pdf; adding a page to a pdf in reader
APPENDIX A  DNS REGISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE 
618 
20. Who controls the .ARPA domain name? 
21. Who Controls ICANN? 
22. What are WGIG, IGF, and IGP? 
23. What is re-delegation of ccTLDs? 
24. How do I get an IDN (Internationalized Domain Name) ccTLD? 
Answers 
What is a domain name? 
A domain name is a unique identifier registered by an individual or organization and is composed in a 
hierarchical fashion. For example, if the web site for a registered domain name is www.example.com, then 
example is the domain name, .com is the top-level domain (TLD), and www is a server, host, or service 
name. When an individual or organization registers a domain name, they are delegated control and 
responsibility for that domain name. Specifically, they are responsible for the operation of at least two 
name servers that will respond authoritatively for information about the domain. This may be provided 
in-house or by a third party, such as an ISP or hosting service. The domain owner controls all naming to 
the left of the domain name. If the domain name registered is example.com, then depending on the 
individual or organizational requirements, the domain owner could create (and give public or private 
access to) systems with names like myhost.example.com or us.example.com or plant1.us.example.com or 
anything the domain owner chooses. 
What is a TLD (or gTLD or ccTLD or sTLD) domain name? 
A TLD is a top-level domain; for example, in www.example.com, .com is the TLD. It is the highest point in 
the domain hierarchy and appears on the right. gTLD is used to describe the generic top-level domains 
such as .com, .net, .edu, etc. ccTLD is used to denote the country code top-level domains such as .us for 
United States and .tv for Tuvala. sTLD is used to describe a sponsored, limited registration TLD such as 
.aero (aeronautical industry) and .travel (travel industry). 
Who is responsible for domain names? 
Since 1998, the organization responsible for all top-level domains (TLDs) is ICANN (The Internet 
Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, www.icann.org), an independent, nonprofit corporation. 
TLDs are split into generic TLDs (gTLDs) such as .com, and .org; country code TLDs (ccTLDs) such as 
.us, .uk, and .my; and sponsored TLDs (sTLDs) such as .aero, .museum, and .travel. ICANN sets the rules 
for domain name disputes, authorizes new TLDs, and oversees through contractual agreements the 
registration and operational processes. ICANN also maintains the list of root-servers and oversees their 
operation. In the case of the gTLDs and sTLDs, ICANN contracts the registration of domain names to 
accredited registrars (www.icann.org/en/registrars/accredited-list.html). Operation of the gTLD and 
sTLD DNS servers is contracted to registry operators. In the case of ccTLDs, a country-code manager is 
designated who is responsible for the specific policies. A list of country-code managers is maintained by 
IANA (Internet Assigned Number Authority) on behalf of ICANN (www.iana.org/domains/root/db/). 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via password by using simple VB.NET demo code. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF.
adding page numbers to pdf documents; add page number to pdf reader
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky
add pdf pages together; adding pages to a pdf
APPENDIX A ■ DNS REGISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE 
619
What TLDs are available? 
The available TLDs are controlled by two processes. For country code TLDs, the list is controlled by ISO 
3166. Each nation in ISO 3166 is automatically assigned a two-letter code. The remaining TLDs, the 
generic TLDs (gTLDs) and sponsored TLDs (sTLD), are controlled by ICANN (www.icann.org). The list of 
available TLDs changes from time to time but currently comprises the original list available prior to the 
establishment of ICANN, which is shown here: 
gTLD 
Use 
Registry Operator 
Registrars 
.com 
Generic. Historically the 
abbreviation for company. 
VeriSign, Inc. until 20-12 
ICANN-accredited registrars 
.net 
Generic. Historically for use by 
network operators. 
VeriSign, Inc. until 2011 
ICANN-accredited registrars 
.org 
Generic. Historically a 
nonprofit organization. 
Public Interest Registry 
(www.pir.org) DNS 
operated by Afilias Limited 
ICANN-accredited registrars 
.mil 
Sponsored. Reserved 
exclusively for use by the US 
military. 
US DOD Network 
Information Center 
US DOD Network 
Information Center 
.gov 
Sponsored. Reserved 
exclusively for use by the US 
government. 
Data Mountain Solutions, 
Inc. (www.datamtn.com) 
US General Services 
Administration (GSA) 
(www.dotgov.gov) 
.int 
Sponsored. Reserved 
exclusively for use by 
organizations established by 
international treaty. 
IANA  
IANA 
(www.iana.org/domains/int/) 
.arpa Special domain name reserved 
for use in reverse mapping. 
IANA 
Not available for registration 
.edu 
Special TLD reserved for use by 
certain US educational 
institutions. 
EDUCAUSE 
(www.educause.edu) 
EDUCAUSE 
(www.educause.edu) 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add page break to pdf; add and delete pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
pageIndexes.Add(3); // The 4th page. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; newDoc.Save(outputFilePath);
add pdf pages to word; add document to pdf pages
APPENDIX A  DNS REGISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE 
620 
On November 16, 2000, ICANN authorized the following TLDs: 
TLD 
Use 
Sponsor 
Registry Operator 
.aero 
Sponsored. Reserved 
for use by the airline 
industry. 
SITA (Société Internationale de 
Télécommunications 
Aéronautiques— www.sita.aero) 
Afilias Ltd 
(www.afilias.info) 
.museum Sponsored. Reserved 
for use by museums. 
Museum Domain Management 
Association (www.musedoma.museum) 
Museum Domain 
Management Association 
(www.musedoma.museum) 
.biz 
Generic but 
restricted business 
name domain. 
NeuLevel, Inc. (www.neulevel.biz) 
NeuLevel, Inc. 
(www.neulevel.biz) 
.info 
Generic information 
resources. 
Afilias Limited (www.afilias.info) 
Afilias Limited 
(www.afilias.info) 
.coop 
Sponsored. Reserved 
for use by 
cooperatives. 
Dot Cooperation LLC 
(www.cooperative.org) 
The Midcounties  Co-
operative Domains Ltd 
(www.mcd.coop) 
.pro 
Generic but 
restricted to certified 
professionals. 
RegistryPro (www.nic.pro) 
Registry Services 
Corporation 
(www.registrypro.pro) 
.name 
Generic but 
restricted for use by 
individuals—vanity 
domain names. 
VeriSign, Inc. (www.name) 
VeriSign, Inc. 
(www.verisign.com) 
On April 8, 2005, ICANN announced the availability of two new sTLDs: 
TLD 
Use 
Sponsor 
Registry Operator 
.travel Sponsored. Reserved for use by the 
travel industry. 
Tralliance 
Corporation 
(www.travel.travel) 
NeuLevel Inc. 
(www.neulevel.biz) 
.jobs 
Sponsored. Reserved for use by 
employment companies and human 
resources organizations. 
Employ Media LLC 
(www.goto.jobs) 
Employ Media LLC 
(www.employmedia.com) 
APPENDIX A ■ DNS REGISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE 
621
On April 28, 2005, ICANN announced the availability of a new sTLD: 
TLD 
Use 
Sponsor 
Registry Operator 
.mobi 
Sponsored. Reserved for users and 
providers of mobile services. 
mTLD Top Level 
Domain Ltd 
(www.mtld.mobi) 
Afilias Ltd 
(www.afilias.info) 
On September 15, 2005, ICANN announced the availability of a new sTLD: 
TLD 
Use 
Sponsor 
Registry Operator 
.cat 
Sponsored. Reserved for Catalan 
linguistic community. 
Fundacio puntCAT 
(www.domini.cat) 
Fundacio puntCAT 
(www.domini.cat) 
On May 10, 2006, ICANN announced the availability of a new sTLD: 
TLD 
Use 
Sponsor 
Registry Operator 
.tel 
Sponsored. Reserved for professional 
and business contact information. 
Telnic Ltd 
(www.telnic.org) 
Telnic Ltd (www.nic.tel) 
On October 18, 2006, ICANN announced the availability of a new sTLD: 
TLD 
Use 
Sponsor 
Registry Operator 
.asia 
Sponsored. Reserved for legal 
entities in Asia/Australia/Pacific 
region. 
DotAsia Organisation 
Ltd.(www.registry.asia) 
Afilias 
Ltd.(www.afilias.info) 
Whois services are typically, but not always, available using www.whois.tld, for example, 
www.whois.aero. 
produced by the ICANN GNSO (Generic Names Supporting Organization) Working Group 
(gnso.icann.org/issues/new-gtlds/pdp-dec05-fr-parta-08aug07.htm). This report recommends 
(author’s selected highlights only) that essentially an unlimited number of new gTLDs should be 
permitted, that a proportion must be IDNs (Internationalized Domain Names), that the technical and 
financial resources of the applicant must be verified to ensure DNS stability, that applications for new 
gTLDs must be judged against pre-existing criteria (Application Guidebook 
www.icann.org/en/topics/new-gtlds/dag-en.htm), and that only ICANN accredited Registrars can sell 
the new domain names. 
I thought www.example.com was my domain name. 
The URL www.example.com is simply the name of a service (or resource). The www is the host or service 
name, in this case www is World Wide Web; example is the domain name part that was registered by the 
APPENDIX A  DNS REGISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE 
622 
user and frequently called the second-level domain (SLD); and .com is the top-level domain (TLD). Once 
you own the domain name, it is delegated to you. You can do anything to the left of example.com, so 
depending on your company, you could create resources (and provide appropriate public or private 
access) with names like myhost.example.com or us.example.com or plant1.us.example.com or anything 
you choose. 
What is a URL (or URI or URN)? 
A Uniform Resource Locator (URL) is the string of letters that define the location of a resource and how 
to access it; for example, http://www.example.com is conventionally the URL of a web service for the 
example.com domain, which is accessed using the HTTP protocol. Part of the URL, www.example.com, is 
used (resolved) by a DNS and an IP address returned from an authoritative DNS for the domain. A 
Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) is the generic, or high-level, term that defines the syntax and rules for 
both URLs and Universal Resource Names (URNs). 
What is an SLD? 
An SLD is a second-level domain. It describes the second name in the domain naming hierarchy below 
the TLD. In example.com, .com is the TLD (in this case a gTLD) and example.com is the SLD. SLD is 
frequently used as a generic expression to denote a user domain name, which works fine for the gTLDs 
(for instance, example.org, example.net); however, it’s rarely appropriate when dealing with ccTLDs 
where the user domain name is frequently a third-level domain name such as example.md.us, 
example.co.uk, or example.com.br. 
How do I register a .com or .org or .net domain name? 
ICANN (The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) has subcontracted the registration 
of domains names to accredited registrars (www.icann.org/en/registrars/accredited-list.html). 
How do I register a domain in Malaysia (or any other country)? 
IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority) maintains a list of current country code top-level domain 
(ccTLD) registration authorities for all recognized countries (www.iana.org/domains/root/db/). Each 
country defined in ISO 3166 is automatically assigned a two-letter TLD such as .my, .au, and .se. You can 
also try www.nic.ccTLD, for example www.nic.se which works for many (but unfortunately not all) 
countries. 
Can I register a domain name in any country? 
There is no single standard for the registration of ccTLDs such as .us or .my. To register a ccTLD, most 
countries require that you satisfy some local qualifications such as being a citizen or a registered 
business, maintaining country offices, or other criteria specific to the particular country registration 
authority. Consult the IANA list of country registration authorities (www.iana.org/domains/root/db/), 
and then follow the country link for detailed information. 
How do I register a US (.us) or state (for instance, ny.us) domain name? 
Historically, the US delegation policy was defined by RFC 1480, which described a locality-based method 
administered via delegation managers. Since April24,  2002, NeuStar, Inc. has been the official registry 
APPENDIX A ■ DNS REGISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE 
623
operator for the .us domain (www.nic.us) with the idea of expanding the use of the name space. Prior to 
April 2002, it was only possible to register a locality based (third or higher level) domain in the .us 
domain (for instance, mynameis.md.us). As of now, with certain exceptions, it is possible to also register a 
second-level domain such as mynameis.us. The locality-based method is still supported for historic 
reasons but new locality registrations appear to be limited only to government entities;  www.nic.us 
defines current locality domain name policies though you have to look hard for the information. 
How do I register a Canadian (.ca) or provincial (for instance, bc.ca) domain name? 
Since November 1, 2000, the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (www.cira.ca) has moved to a 
distributed model (like ICANN) in which the process of registration is handled by certified registrars. A 
list of these registrars can be found at the CIRA web site (www.cira.ca). The new registration procedure 
covers both national (mynameis.ca) and provincial (mynameis.qc.ca) registrations. 
If I register a .com, do I automatically register in every country? 
Your .com (or .net or .org, etc.) domain name is accessible from every country in the world as is every 
other domain name, but registering a .com (or .net or .org or .coop) domain name does not grant any 
rights in another country. For instance, if example.com is registered, then anyone can still register 
example.us (United States) or example.tv (Tuvala) or example.net, assuming they are available for 
registration. 
What happens when I register a domain name? 
When you register a domain name, four types of information are normally requested: 
Registrant contact details: This section defines the owner of the domain name and requires the full 
name, address, telephone number, fax number, and e-mail address. When you register a domain 
name, it’s vital that the e-mail address in particular is correct, accessible by you, and preferably not 
in your own domain name—in the event that you are either disputing the ownership of the domain 
or changing suppliers—the very time that you need this e-mail address—it may not be working or 
available. 
Administration contact details: The administration contact controls (and approves) any changes to 
the rest of the domain name details and is thus the party responsible for the domain. While this will 
typically be the same as the registrant if a domain is licensed to a third party, the third party’s 
information would be included here. This section requires the full name, address, telephone 
number, fax number, and e-mail address. The administration contact controls (and approves) any 
changes to the rest of the domain name details. 
Technical contact details: Generally, the technical contact also supplies the DNS service for 
convenience, but this is not essential. This section requires the full name, address, telephone 
number, fax number, and e-mail address of the technical or DNS delegation authority. 
Billing contact details: The location where registration fee invoices are sent. This section requires 
the full name, address, telephone number, fax number, and e-mail address. Certain registration 
organizations will send regular mail invoices and reminders, so having correct information here is 
vital. 
Primary and secondary name servers (DNS): This section usually requires both the name and IP 
address of the name servers that will be authoritative for your domain. Generally, but not always, 
these will be the responsibility of the technical contact. 
APPENDIX A  DNS REGISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE 
624 
During the registration process, you may be asked for an authentication method—typically you 
have a choice of e-mail or web interface with a username and password. If e-mail is selected, whenever a 
change is made to the registration record, the registrar will send an e-mail to the address specified in the 
registrant/administrative contact record and request confirmation of the change. It is vital that this e-
mail address is valid and accessible under all conditions. Since the e-mail address is the piece of 
information most likely to be needed, it is recommended that this e-mail address not be in your domain 
(that is, use a free Hotmail, Gmail, or Yahoo! account and keep it active). 
Many ISPs and service providers offer to register domain names on behalf of their clients. If this is 
done, the registration should be verified immediately, using a whois service, to confirm that the 
registrant/administration contact (the domain owner) is the real owner and not the ISP or other third 
party. If the ISP or third party is the registrant/administration contact, then they effectively control the 
domain, and it may not be possible, in the event of a dispute, to change or move the domain name. 
What do the primary and secondary DNS server names do and why are they necessary? 
When you register a domain name with a certified or accredited registrar, the authority for management 
of that domain is delegated to you. As the delegated party, you are responsible for providing at least two 
DNS servers that will respond authoritatively for your domain—they will provide answers to questions 
such as “What is the IP address of your web site?” The DNS service can be provided by running your own 
DNS servers, or it can in turn be delegated to a third party such as an ISP or a specialized DNS hosting 
service. Increasingly, many registrars also offer domain parking services to satisfy the minimum 
registration requirements. The DNS names and/or IP addresses of the authoritative servers are defined 
in the registration record for your domain (a minimum of two, but can be more) and are used by the 
registry operator for the TLD involved to refer queries for your domain’s web site such as 
www.example.com to your domain’s DNS. When a local DNS looks for a name, say, www.example.com, and 
can’t find it locally, it will ask one of the root-servers for the information, which will cause a referral to 
the TLD server for the domain, in this case .com. The .com DNS will return a referral containing the name 
and IP addresses of the DNSs that contain the authoritative information for your domain, for instance, 
ns1.example.com. The local DNS will then interrogate the authoritative DNS for the domain, 
ns1.example.com, for the specific service or server, such as www.example.com, and get back its IP address. 
redundancy purposes. A single DNS may become overloaded or fail, so if the first DNS is not available, 
the second is tried, then the third, and so on. 
How do I change my domain name information? 
To change your domain information, you must go to the registrar with whom you registered the domain 
name and follow their procedure for changes or modifications. Depending on the procedures defined by 
the registrar, the administration contact associated with the domain may have to authorize any changes 
via e-mail or some other procedure selected when the domain name was originally registered. 
Increasingly, the process of domain change is being provided via secure registrar web interfaces, and the 
owner of the username and password (used to secure access to the domain information) are assumed to 
have the rights to perform modifications without any other verification. 
How do I register an .edu (or .mil or .gov or .int) name? 
All these TLDs are sponsored (sTLDs) and have restricted use. The .edu gTLD is available only for 
educational institutions in the United States, and registration is handled exclusively by EDUCAUSE 
(www.educause.edu). The .gov gTLD is reserved exclusively for the United States government, and 
registration is handled by the General Services Administration (GSA) at www.dotgov.gov. The .mil TLD is 
reserved exclusively for use by the United States military, and registration is handled by the US DOD 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested