c# : winform : pdf viewer : Add page number to pdf SDK application API .net html winforms sharepoint Ron%20Aitchison%20-%20Pro%20DNS%20and%20BIND%2010%20-%2020118-part1394

CHAPTER 4 ■ DNS TYPES 
75
Note There is a third possibility, which is to define the internal network as using exclusively private IP addresses 
and to use a NAT gateway as the means of securing the internal network and limiting access to the external world. 
The world of the Internet has many conceptual disagreements. The argument between those who view NAT as a 
perfect solution that kept the Internet alive when it was in danger of running out of IPv4 addresses and those who 
see NAT as inherently evil is one of the more contentious. This book will stay gracefully agnostic on the topic of 
NAT, other than to point out that, increasingly, services that are delivered to desktops, such as VoIP, do require 
network visibility of end-user systems. 
Example configuration files for a stealth DNS configuration are provided in Chapter 7. 
Authoritative-only Name Server 
The term authoritative-only name server is normally used to describe two related properties of a DNS 
server: 
1. The name server will deliver authoritative answers; it is a zone master or slave 
for one or more domains. 
2. The name server does not cache. 
Authoritative-only servers are typically used in two distinct configurations: 
1. 
perimeter security. 
2. As high-performance name servers, for example, root-servers, TLD servers, or 
name servers for high-volume sites. 
Authoritative-only servers typically have high performance requirements. For many years, BIND 
was the only DNS software used by the root-servers and many of the TLD servers, which also have 
serious performance requirements, since it provides a high quality, highly functional, and stable 
platform. However, general-purpose DNS software, such as BIND 9, provides an excellent solution but is 
not optimized for use in high-performance authoritative-only servers. There are now a number of open 
source and commercial alternatives that specialize in high-performance authoritative-only DNS 
solutions, as discussed in Chapter 1. Indeed, the first member of the new BIND 10 family of DNS 
products is an authoritative-only name server (a first look at BIND 10 is available as an online chapter of 
this book). 
recursion statement 
effectively inhibits caching, as shown in the following BIND named.conf file fragment: 
// options clause fragment of named.conf 
// recursion no = effectively inhibits caching 
options { 
recursion no; 
}; 
// zone clauses 
.... 
Add page number to pdf - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page numbers to pdf in preview; adding page numbers to pdf in reader
Add page number to pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page to a pdf; add page number pdf
CHAPTER 4 ■ DNS TYPES 
76 
BIND 9 provides three more parameters to control caching: max-cache-size (limits the size of the
cache on the file system) and max-cache-ttl (defines the maximum time RRs may live in the cache and
overrides all RR TTL values), neither of which will have much effect on performance in the particular
case just discussed, and allow-recursion (provides a list of hosts that are permitted to use recursion—all
others are not). 
Summary 
This chapter described a number of commonly used DNS configurations and characteristics.
Name servers, especially in smaller organizations, rarely perform a single function. They are almost by
their nature schizophrenic. Indeed, the strength of general-purpose DNS software, especially BIND 9, is
that it can be used to precisely configure multifaceted solutions. However, DNS software is undergoing
significant change—driven by increasing complexity (notably but not exclusively, DNSSEC), increased
demand for robustness and reliability, data-source flexibility, and superior performance. The increasing
trend is to specialized DNS software, which is reflected in the significant number of both open source
and commercial products that are providing either authoritative-only functionally (master or slave) or
caching-only (resolver) functionality. The BIND 10 family (available as an online chapter of this book) is
part of this trend.  You also learned about the behavior of zone masters, zone slaves, caching servers,
forwarding servers, and authoritative-only servers. You saw the configuration of stealth (or split) servers
used in perimeter defense employing both classic configurations and BIND 9’s view clause. 
In Chapter 5, you’ll look at the world of IPv6 and its implications for DNS. 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
pageIndex, The page index of the PDF page that will be 0
add and remove pages from a pdf; add page numbers pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
If your page number is set as 1, then the two output PDF files will contains the first page and the later three pages Add necessary references:
add and delete pages in pdf online; add page pdf reader
C H A P T E R   5 
■ ■ ■ 
77
DNS and IPv6 
While IPv6 provides many improvements in network management, one of the major driving forces 
behind its design was to greatly increase address space. An IPv4 address uses 32 bits whereas an IPv6 
address uses 128 bits. Thus, IPv6 is theoretically capable of providing many millions of IP addresses for 
every human on the planet! 
The original IETF specifications for IPv6 date from 1995 but the Classless Inter-Domain Routing and 
Network Address Translation (see the “IPv4 Addresses and CIDR” sidebar in Chapter 3) initiatives of the 
mid-90s effectively postponed the urgent need for additional address space. IPv6 usage until 2006 was 
largely confined to experimental networks such as the IETF’s 6bone (www.6bone.net) and large-scale 
deployment was limited to academic institutions. 
There are a number of significant developments that have given urgent impetus to IPv6 and have 
significantly increased its deployment: 
• Mobile communications: The emerging 4G standards (primarily LTE and WiMax) 
will use packet switching (IP) technologies for all communications (voice and 
data), thus requiring every mobile device to have an IP address at all times. The 
3rd Generation Partnership Project (www.3gpp.org), consisting of mobile wireless 
equipment suppliers and operators, has proposed standards that allow for both 
IPv4 and IPv6 but Release 8 (March 2009) defined a new, more efficient, dual-stack 
mechanism (IPv4v6). Since 4G networks will likely be deployed at a time when 
IPv4 address depletion (see below) will be reaching critical levels, it’s reasonable 
to assume that IPv6 will be the preferred, if not the only viable, IP address 
technology for 4G networks. The first IPv6 mobile usage was publicly 
demonstrated in late 2004. 
• DNS support: IPv6 addresses are already published by 8 of the 13 root-servers. 
• Address allocation: IPv6 address block assignments may be obtained from all the 
regional Internet registries (RIRs), which comprise ARIN (www.arin.net covering 
North America and Southern Africa), RIPE (www.ripe.net covering Europe, North 
Africa, and the Middle East), APNIC (www.apnic.net covering Asia Pacific), LACNIC 
(www.lacnic.net covering South America), and AFRINIC (www.afrinic.net 
covering Africa). 
• Software availability: IPv6 stacks and dual (IPv6/IPv4) stacks are provided with 
Windows (from Server 2003 and XP), Linux, UNIX, and the BSDs (FreeBSD, 
NetBSD, and OpenBSD). 
• Mainstream technology: The IETF wrapped up its 6bone experimental and test-
bed network and transferred its special IPv6 addresses range to IANA in June 2006. 
In essence, this endorsed the production-ready status of IPv6. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages Add necessary references
adding page numbers in pdf file; add and delete pages from pdf
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Add necessary references: Description: Search specified string from all the PDF pages. eg: The first page is 0. 0
add contents page to pdf; adding page numbers to pdf documents
CHAPTER 5  DNS AND IPV6 
78 
• IPv4 address depletion: Increasingly dire warnings are being heard from all the 
RIRs that the remaining IPv4 address stock will, for all practical purposes, be 
exhausted shortly—perhaps even as soon as the end of 2011. 
Probably the most significant push for IPv6, however, is coming from the changing nature of 
Internet-based applications. Classic Internet applications such as those providing web access, e-mail, 
and FTP use a traditional client-server model and can handle mapping private addresses to a limited 
range of IPv4 public IP addresses using network address translation (NAT) strategies with some help 
from application-level gateways (ALGs). However, the new generation of Internet applications—such as 
Instant Messaging (IM) and Voice over IP (VoIP) among others—use a peer-to-peer model and 
increasingly require always-on capabilities (permanent connection to the Internet) and need end-user 
address transparency (any given user’s equipment IP address must be publicly visible and fixed (static
over a reasonable period of time). The current IPv4 address scheme is incapable of providing all peer-to-
peer users with end-user address transparency; there simply are not enough addresses. Figure 5–1 
illustrates the difference between the client-server model with NAT and peer-to-peer applications. 
Figure 5–1. IP Address Transparency 
The huge investment in IPv4 together with the size of the current installed base means IPv4 will not 
disappear overnight. IPv6 and IPv4 will have to coexist for some considerable period of time, and serious 
attention has been paid to IPv4 transition and interworking schemes in the various IPv6 RFCs. There are 
significant implications for DNS in both IPv6 and mixed IPv6/IPv4 environments. 
Now that you have a better general understanding for why IPv6 will soon become a particularly 
important part of the network environment, let’s take a moment to introduce IPv6 before delving into 
the implications it will have on DNS implementations. 
Client-Server Model
Private IP(s)
PC initiates access
NAT Private > Public translation
maps source (PC) - dest (web) pair
NAT response uses inverted
source (PC) - dest (web) IP pair
to map local PC
VolP Peer initiates access
NAT has no existing source-dest
pair to map a specific PC
Which PC?
PC
VolP
Peer
NAT
PC
Web
Server
NAT
Peer-to-Peer Model
Public IP(s)
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. matchString, The string wil be deleted from PDF file, -. 0
adding page numbers to a pdf file; add a page to a pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
200F); annot.EndPoint = new PointF(300F, 400F); // add annotation to The string wil be highlighted from PDF file, 0
add pages to pdf reader; add pages to pdf online
CHAPTER 5 ■ DNS AND IPV6 
79
IPv6 
IPv6 is a big and complex protocol providing many new features for the efficient operation and 
management of dynamic networks, including the following: 
• 
• Scoped addresses—IPv6 addresses can be limited to the local LAN or a private 
network, or they can be globally unique. 
• Security is defined as part of the protocol. 
• Autoconfiguration—stateless or stateful (DHCP enhancements). 
• Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6) is significantly more powerful than its IPv4 counterpart. 
This section is not designed to fully describe the IPv6 protocol but rather to familiarize you with the 
addressing features of IPv6 as they affect the DNS system. 
Each IPv6 network interface, such as a LAN card on a PC or a mobile phone, may have more than 
one IPv6 address—that is, IPv6 is naturally multihomed. An IPv6 address has a scope: it can be restricted 
to a single LAN, a private network, or be globally unique. Table 5–1 defines the types of IPv6 addresses 
that are supported and contrasts them with the closest IPv4 functional equivalent. 
Table 5–1. Comparison of IPv6 and IPv4 Functionality 
IPv6 Name Scope/Description 
IPv4 Equivalent 
Notes 
Link-Local Local LAN only. 
Automatically assigned 
based on MAC. Can’t be 
routed outside local LAN. 
No real equivalent. 
Assigned IPv4 over ARP’d 
MAC. 
Automatically configured by 
most stacks from the LAN 
Media Access Control (MAC) 
address of the network 
interface. Scoped address 
concept new to IPv6. 
Site-Local 
Optional. Local site only. 
Cannot be routed over the 
Internet. Assigned by user. 
Private network address 
(RFC 1918) with 
multihomed interface is 
closest equivalent. 
Work is ongoing by the IETF 
to clarify the use of the Site-
Local address and support 
has currently been 
withdrawn. 
Global 
Unicast 
Globally unique. Fully 
routable. Assigned by 
IANA/aggregators/ Internet 
registries (IRs). 
Global IP address. 
IPv6 and IPv4 similar but 
IPv6 can have other scoped 
addresses. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with Other SDKs. Please note that, PDF page number starts from 0.
add page to existing pdf file; add pages to pdf file
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. 0
adding a page to a pdf document; add blank page to pdf preview
CHAPTER 5  DNS AND IPV6 
80 
IPv6 Name Scope/Description 
IPv4 Equivalent 
Notes 
Multicast 
One-to-many. Hierarchy of 
multicasting. 
Similar to IPv4 Class D. 
Significantly more powerful 
than IPv4 version. No 
broadcast in IPv6, replaced 
by Multicast. 
Anycast 
One-to-nearest. Uses 
Global Unicast addresses. 
Routers only. Discovery 
uses. 
Unique protocols in IPv4, 
for example, IGMP. 
Some Anycast addresses 
reserved for special 
functions. Since anycasting 
is transparent and is 
supported only by routers it 
can be used in IPv4 
networks. 
Loopback 
Local interface scope. 
Same as IPv4 127.0.0.1. 
Same function. 
IPv6 Address Notation 
written as a series of eight hexadecimal strings separated by colons. Each string represents 16 bits and 
consists of four hexadecimal characters (0 – 9, A - F), thus each hexadecimal character represents 4 bits. 
The following are IPv6 address examples: 
# all the following refer to the same address 
2001:0DB8:0234:C1AB:0000:00A0:AABC:003F 
# leading zeros can always be omitted 
2001:DB8:234:C1AB:0:A0:AABC:3F 
# not case sensitive - any mixture allowed 
2001:db8:234:C1ab:0:A0:aabc:3F 
Complete zero entries can be omitted entirely but only once in an address, like so: 
# full ipv6 address 
2001:db8:234:C1AB:0000:00A0:0000:003F 
# address with single 0 dropped 
2001:db8:234:C1ab:0:A0::003F 
# alternate form using single 0 dropped 
2001:db8:234:C1ab::A0:0:003F 
# but the following is invalid 
2001:db8:0234:C1ab::A0::003F 
Multiple zero entries can be omitted entirely but only once in an address, like so: 
# omitting multiple zeros in address 
2001:db8:0:0:0:0:0:3F 
# can be written as 
2001:db8::3F 
# lots of zeros (loopback address) 
0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1 
CHAPTER 5 ■ DNS AND IPV6 
81
# can be written as 
::1 
# all zeros (unspecified, a.k.a unassigned IP) 
0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 
# can be written as 
:: 
# but this address 
2001:db8:0:1:0:0:0:3F 
# cannot be reduced to this 
2001:db8::1::3F  # INVALID 
# instead it can only be reduced to 
2001:db8::1:0:0:0:3F 
# or 
2001:db8:0:1::3F 
A hybrid format may be used when dealing with IPv6-IPv4 addresses where the normal IPv4 dotted 
decimal notation may be used after the first six 16-bit address elements, like so: 
# generic IPv6-IPv4 format x.x.x.x.x.x.d.d.d.d 
# example of an IPv4 mapped IPv6 address 
# with an IPv4 number of 192.168.0.5 
2001:db8:0:0:0:FFFF:192.168.0.5 
# or using zero ommission 
2001:db8::FFFF:192.168.0.5 
Prefix or Slash Notation 
IPv6 addresses use the IP prefix or slash notation in a similar manner to IPv4 to indicate the number of 
contiguous bits in the netmask, like so: 
# a single IP address - 128 bit netmask for loopback 
::1/128 
# /128 is a netmask of FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF 
# equivalent of IPv4 127.0.0.1/32 
# values only required to cover the prefix 
# Link-Local address mask (see below) 
FE8::/10 
# or top 3 bits only with fixed value 001 (binary) 
2::/3 
# example end user site prefix routing mask 
2001:db8:222::/48 
# example end user subnet routing mask 
2001:db8:222:1::/64 
See the “IPv4 Addresses and CIDR” sidebar in Chapter 3 for more information. 
IPv6 Address Types 
The type of IP address is defined by a variable number of the top bits of its address—the bits are 
collectively known as the binary prefix (BP). Only as many bits as required are used to identify the 
CHAPTER 5  DNS AND IPV6 
82 
Table 5–2. IPv6 Address Types 
Use 
Binary Prefix 
IP Prefix  
Description/Notes 
Unspecified 00...0 
::/128 
IPv6 address = 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 (or ::). Used before an 
address allocated by DHCP (equivalent of IPv4 
0.0.0.0). 
Loopback 
00...1 
::1/128 
IPv6 address = 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1 (or ::1). Local PC 
Loopback address (equivalent of IPv4 127.0.0.1). 
Multicast 
1111 1111 
FF00::/8 
IPv6 Multicast replaces both multicast and 
broadcast in IPv4. 
Link-Local 
Unicast 
1111 1110 10 
FE80::/1 
Local LAN scope. Lower bits assigned by user. 
Reserved 
Unicast 
1111 1110 11 
FEC0::/10 
Was the Site-Local address range. This address range 
is currently reserved by IANA while the IETF 
considers the status of the Site-Local features of 
IPv6. 
Global 
Unicast 
All other values  
Assigned by IANA and aggregators. IANA assigns 
address netblocks to aggregators (RIRs) as defined at 
www.iana.org/assignments/ipv6-unicast-address-
assignments/. The Global Unicast address format is 
defined in the “Global Unicast IPv6 Address 
Allocation” Section. 
Note The generic term aggregator is used to describe various Internet registries (RIRs and ISPs) that are 
responsible for the allocation of IPv6 addresses and for IPv6 reverse-map delegation. 
Global Unicast IPv6 Address Allocation 
The IPv6 Global Unicast address is hierarchical and is divided into what was historically called a site 
prefix but has now been renamed a global routing prefix, a subnet ID and interface ID address parts. 
Various agencies or Internet registries—called aggregators in IPv6 terminology—assign the global 
routing prefix as defined in Figure 5–2. 
CHAPTER 5 ■ DNS AND IPV6 
83
Figure 5–2. IPv6 hierarchical address allocation
IP address allocation follows similar rules as those for domain name delegation in that each level 
delegates control to the next level in the hierarchy. Thus, Figure 5–2 allows the RIRs (APNIC, AFRINIC, 
ARIN, RIPE, and LACNIC) to assign either directly to ISPs/LIRs (local Internet registries) or via an NIR 
(national Internet registry). As an illustration, APNIC assigns directly to LIRs in certain countries whereas 
in a number of other countries (for example China) assignments are made to the NIR (in this case 
CNNIC at www.cnnic.cn), which then assigns to its national LIRs or end users. 
RFC 3177 defines the current IETF/IAB policy for end-user IPv6 address allocation. It is important to 
note that this RFC has only informational status and RIRs/NIRs/LIRs can, and do, adopt varying 
allocation policies. According to RFC 3177 end users may be allocated one of three IPv6 address ranges: 
1. Normal end user: An end user is normally allocated a full 80 bits of address 
space (see Table 5–4 in the next section for a description of the format). The 
allocated address space may be assigned in any way required by the end user. 
This normal end-user address range allocation is greater than the whole of the 
current IPv4 Internet. This allocation is written as /48 in the slash or IP prefix 
notation. 
2. Single subnet: Where it is known that only a single subnet (site) will be used, the 
written as /64 in the slash or IP prefix notation. 
3. Single device: Where it is known that only one device will be used, a single IPv6 
address may be allocated. This allocation is written as /128 in the slash or IP 
prefix notation. 
Internet registries may, however, allocate much larger IPv6 address blocks to groups of users such as 
governments. 
End User
ICANN/IANA
RIR
ISP/LIR
RIR
Regional
National
Local
ISP/LIR
NIR
CHAPTER 5  DNS AND IPV6 
84 
IPv6 Global Unicast Address Format 
The generic format of an IPv6 Global Unicast address is shown in Table 5–3. 
Table 5–3. Generic IPv6 Global Unicast Address Format 
Name 
Size 
Description/Notes 
Global routing prefix Variable Assigned by IANA/Aggregators/RIRs/NIRs 
Subnet ID 
Variable Used for subnet routing. Assigned by RIRs/NIRs/ISPs/LIRs 
Interface ID 
64 bits 
Equivalent of the host address in IPv4. May also be referred to as 
either IID or EUI-64. 
In the original, now obsolete, IPv6 RFCs a Global Routing Prefix consisting of 48 bits was subdivided 
into a strict hierarchy of fixed length bit fields, each of which was assigned by an aggregator. In addition, 
the Subnet ID was a fixed 16 bits in length and assigned to the end user as described above. The current 
IPv6 addressing standard (RFC 4291) has opted for a more flexible structure which retains a fixed 64 bit 
Interface ID but defines the Global Routing Prefix and Subnet ID as being of variable length within the 
remaining 64 bits of the IPv6 address. The net effect of this change is two-fold. First, ICANN/IANA and 
the RIRs, as well as any NIRs/ISPs/LIRs, can tactically allocate from the combined 64 bit space based on 
local requirements and agreements. IANA publishes its current IPv6 allocations, which typically vary 
from /12 to /23 netblocks (www.iana.org/assignments/ipv6-unicast-address-assignments); RIRs do not 
publish their allocations. Second, the Subnet ID may be 16 bits (a /48, as in the original IAB 
recommendation), 8 bits (a /56), or even lower if conditions require it. A request by an end user for an 
IPv6 address block should be directed to the Local LIR, which is normally, but not always, an ISP. Lists of 
LIRs may be obtained from each RIR, as defined in Table 5–4. 
Table 5–4. Regional Internet Registries 
RIR Name 
Coverage 
Web 
APNIC 
Asia Pacific 
www.apnic.net 
ARIN 
North America, Southern Africa, parts of the Caribbean 
www.arin.net 
LACNIC 
South America, parts of the Caribbean 
www.apnic.net 
RIPE 
Europe, Middle East, Northern Africa, parts of Asia 
www.ripe.net 
AFRINIC 
Africa  
www.afrinic.net 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested