c# adobe pdf reader control : Adding page numbers to pdf document Library software class asp.net windows web page ajax ScienceHumanBehavior44-part1751

DESIGNING A CULTURE
435
crucial problems. It is in the spirit of science to insist upon careful 
observation, the collection of adequate information, and the 
formulation of conclusions which contain a minimum of wishful 
thinking. All of this is as applicable to complex situations as to simple. 
In addition, a rigorous science of human behavior offers the following 
kinds of practical help.
A demonstration of basic behavioral processes under simplified 
conditions enables us to see these processes at work in complex cases, 
even though they cannot be treated rigorously there. If these 
processes are recognized, the complex case may be more 
intelligently handled. This is the kind of contribution which a pure 
science is most likely to make to technology. For example, a 
behavioral process frequently occupies a considerable period of time 
and often cannot be observed at all through casual observation. 
When the process is revealed with proper recording techniques 
under controlled conditions, we may recognize it and utilize it in the 
complex case in the world at large. Punishment gives quick results, 
and casual observation recommends its use, but we may be 
dissuaded from taking this momentary advantage if we know that 
progress towards a better solution is being made in some alternative 
course of action. It is difficult to resist punishing a child for conduct 
which it will eventually outgrow without punishment until we have 
adequate evidence of the process of growth. Only when 
developmental schedules have been carefully established by 
scientific investigation are we likely to put up with the 
inconvenience of foregoing punishment. The process of extinction 
also requires a good deal of time and is not clear to casual inspection. 
We are not likely to use the process effectively until the scientific 
study of simpler instances has assured us that a given end-state will 
indeed be reached. It is the business of science to make clear the 
consequences of various operations performed upon a system. Only 
when we have seen these consequences clearly set forth are we 
likely to be influenced by their counterparts in complex practical 
situations.
A rigorous science of behavior makes a different sort of remote 
consequence effective when it leads us to recognize survival as a 
criterion in evaluating a controlling practice. We have seen that hap-
Adding page numbers to pdf document - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page numbers to pdf online; adding a page to a pdf document
Adding page numbers to pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add pages to pdf acrobat; add page number to pdf hyperlink
436     
THE CONTROL OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR
piness, justice, knowledge, and so on are not far removed from 
certain immediate consequences which reinforce the individual in 
selecting one culture or one practice against another. But just as the 
immediate advantage gained through punishment is eventually 
matched by later disadvantages, these immediate consequences of 
a cultural practice may be followed by others of a different sort. A 
scientific analysis may lead us to resist the more immediate 
blandishments of freedom, justice, knowledge, or happiness in 
considering the long-run consequence of survival.
Perhaps the greatest contribution which a science of behavior 
may make to the evaluation of cultural practices is an insistence 
upon experimentation. We have no reason to suppose that any 
cultural practice is always right or wrong according to some 
principle or value regardless of the circumstances or that anyone 
can at any given time make an absolute evaluation of its survival 
value. So long as this is recognized, we are less likely to seize 
upon the hard and fast answer as an escape from indecision, and 
we are more likely to continue to modify cultural design in order to 
test the consequences.
Science helps us in deciding between alternative courses of 
action by making past consequences effective in determining future 
conduct. Although no one course of action may be exclusively 
dictated by scientific experience, the existence of any scientific 
parallel, no matter how sketchy, will make it somewhat more likely 
that the more profitable of two courses will be taken. To those who 
are accustomed to evaluating a culture in terms of absolute 
principles, this may seem inadequate. But it appears to be the best 
we can do. The formalized experience of science, added to the 
practical experience of the individual in a complex set of 
circumstances, offers the best basis for effective action. What is 
left is not the realm of the value judgment; it is the realm of 
guessing. When we do not know, we guess. Science does not 
eliminate guessing, but by narrowing the field of alternative courses 
of action it helps us to guess more effectively.
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF document file but also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you
add pages to pdf without acrobat; add a page to a pdf online
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
but also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated Besides, using this Word document adding control, you can add some Create Word From PDF.
adding page numbers in pdf; add remove pages from pdf
CHAPTER
XXIX
THE PROBLEM OF CONTROL
There are certain rules of thumb according to which 
human behavior has long been controlled which make up a species 
of pre-scientific craft. The scientific study of behavior has reached 
the point where it is supplying additional techniques. As the 
methods of science continue to be applied to behavior, we may 
expect technical contributions to multiply rapidly. If we may judge 
from the application of science to other practical problems, the 
effect upon human affairs will be tremendous.
We have no guarantee that the power thus generated will be used 
for what now appear to be the best interests of mankind. As the 
technology of modern warfare clearly shows, scientists have not 
been able to prevent the use of their achievements in ways which 
are very far from the original purposes of science. A science of 
behavior does not contain within itself any means of controlling 
the use to which its contributions will be put. Machiavelli's 
prescientific insight into human behavior was dedicated to 
preserving the power of a governmental agency. In Nazi Germany 
the results of a more exact science were applied to similarly 
restricted interests. Can this be prevented? Are we to continue to 
develop a science of behavior without
437
438     
THE CONTROL OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR
regard to the use which will be made of it? If not, to whom is the 
control which it generates to be delegated?
This is not only a puzzling question, it is a frightening one; for 
there is good reason to fear those who are most apt to seize 
control. To the suggestion that science would eventually be able to 
"control man's thoughts with precision" Winston Churchill once 
replied, "I shall be very content if my task in this world is done 
before that happens." This is not, however, a wholly satisfactory 
disposition of the problem. Other kinds of solutions may be 
classified under four general headings.
Denying control. One proposed solution is to insist that man is a 
free agent and forever beyond the reach of controlling techniques. 
It is apparently no longer possible to seek refuge in that belief. The 
freedom which is at issue in the evaluation of governments is 
related to the countercontrol of aversive techniques. A doctrine of 
personal freedom appeals to anyone to whom the release from 
coercive control is important. But behavior is determined in 
noncoercive ways; and as other kinds of control are better 
understood, the doctrine of personal freedom becomes less and less 
effective as a motivating device and less and less tenable in a 
theoretical understanding of human behavior. We all control, and 
we are all controlled. As human behavior is further analyzed, 
control will become more effective. Sooner or later the problem 
must be faced.
Refusing to control. An alternative solution is the deliberate 
rejection of the opportunity to control. The best example of this 
comes from psychotherapy. The therapist is often clearly aware of 
his power over the individual who turns to him for help. The 
misuse of that power requires, as we have seen, unusual ethical 
standards. Carl R. Rogers has written, "One cannot take 
responsibility for evaluating a person's abilities, motives, conflicts, 
needs; for evaluating the adjustment he is capable of achieving, the 
degree of reorganization he should undergo, the conflicts which he 
should resolve, the degree of dependence which he should develop 
upon the therapist, and the goals of therapy, without a significant 
degree of control over the individual being an inevitable 
accompaniment. As this process is
THE  PROBLEM OF CONTROL
439
extended to more and more persons, as it is for example to thousands 
of veterans, it means a subtle control of persons and their values and 
goals by a group which has selected itself to do the controlling. The 
fact that it is a subtle and well-intentioned control makes it only 
less likely that people will realize what they are accepting." * Rogers' 
solution is to minimize the contact between patient and therapist to 
the point at which control seems to vanish.
Philosophies of government which arise from a similar fear of control 
are represented in an extreme form by anarchy and more 
conservatively by the doctrine of laisser faire. "He governs best 
who governs least." This does not mean that moderate 
governmental techniques are especially effective, for if that were true 
the moderate government would govern most. It means that a 
government which governs least is relatively free from the dangers of 
misuse of power. In economics a similar philosophy defends the 
normal stabilizing processes of a "free" economy against all forms of 
regulation.
To refuse to accept control, however, is merely to leave control in 
other hands. Rogers has argued that the individual holds within 
himself the solution to his problems and that for this reason the 
therapist need not take positive action. But what are the ultimate 
sources of the inner solution? If the individual is the product of a 
culture in which there is marked ethical and religious training, in which 
governmental control and education have been effective, in which 
economic reinforcement has worked in an acceptable way, and in 
which there is a substantial lay wisdom applicable to personal 
problems, he may very well "find a solution," and a therapist may not 
be necessary. But if the individual is the product of excessive, 
unskillful, or otherwise damaging control, or has received atypical 
ethical or religious training, or is subject to extreme deprivations, or has 
received powerful economic reinforcements for asocial behavior, no 
acceptable solution may be available "within himself." In government 
a philosophy of laisser faire is effective if the citizen is in contact with 
religious, educational, and other types of agencies, which supply the 
control which the government refuses to accept. The program of 
anarchy, which argues that man will flourish as soon as governmental 
control is withdrawn,
Harvard Educational Review, Fall 1948, page 212.
440     
THE CONTROL OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR
usually neglects to identify the other controlling forces which 
adapt man to a stable social system. A "free society" is one in 
which the individual is controlled by agencies other than 
government. The "faith in the common man" which makes a 
philosophy of democracy possible is actually a faith in other 
sources of control. When the governmental structure of the United 
States was being designed, the advocates of a minimal government 
could point to effective religious and ethical controls; if these had 
been lacking, a program of laisser faire would have left the people 
of the country to other controlling agencies with possibly disastrous 
results. Similarly, in an uncontrolled economy, prices, wages, and 
so on are free to change as functions of variables which are not 
arranged by a governmental agency; but they are not free in any 
other sense.
To refuse to accept control, and thus to leave control to other 
sources, often has the effect of diversifying control. Diversification 
is another possible solution to our problem.
Diversifying control. A rather obvious solution is to distribute 
the control of human behavior among many agencies which have so 
little in common that they are not likely to join together in a 
despotic unit. In general this is the argument for democracy against 
totalitarianism. In a totalitarian state all agencies are brought 
together under a single superagency. A state religion conforms to 
governmental principles. Through state ownership the superagency 
acquires complete economic control. Schools are used to support 
governmental practices and to train men and women according to 
the needs of the state, while education which might oppose the 
governmental program is prevented through control of speech and 
the press. Even psychotherapy may become a function of the state, 
as in Nazi Germany, where, because there were no opposing 
agencies, extreme measures were adopted.
A unified agency is often said to be more efficient, but it makes 
a solution to the problem of control very difficult. It is the 
inefficiency of diversified agencies which offers some guarantee 
against the despotic use of power. A simple example of the 
beneficial effect of diversification is provided by American 
advertising. Large sums of money are spent annually to induce 
people to purchase particular
THE  PROBLEM OF CONTROL
441
brands of goods. A large part of the control attempted by each 
company is counteracted by the control attempted by others. 
Insofar as advertising is directed toward the choice of brand only, 
the net effect is probably slight. If all the money used to promote 
particular brands of cigarettes, for example, were devoted to 
increasing the number of cigarettes smoked per day regardless of 
brand, the effect might well be more marked. This fact is 
recognized by industries which pool their advertising funds to 
promote a type of product rather than individual brands.
In a democracy there is a similar, but much more important, 
canceling out of the effects of control: economic control is often 
opposed by education and by governmental restrictions; 
governmental and religious control is often opposed by 
psychotherapy; there is often some opposition between 
government and religion; and so on. So long as the opposing forces 
remain in some sort of balance, excessive exploitation by any one 
agency is avoided. This does not mean that control is never 
misused. Proceeds from control tend to be less conspicuous when 
thus divided, and no one agency increases its power to the point at 
which the members of the group take alarm. It does not follow, 
however, that diversified control does more than diversify the 
proceeds.
The great advantage of diversification is not closely related to 
the problem of control. Diversification permits a safer and more 
flexible experimentation in the design of culture. The totalitarian 
state is weak because if it makes a mistake, the whole culture may 
be destroyed. Under diversification, new techniques of control 
may be tested locally without a serious threat to the whole 
structure.
Those who accept diversification as a solution to the problem of 
control find it possible to adopt several appropriate measures. One 
controlling agency is explicitly opposed to another. Legislation 
against monopolistic practices, for example, prevents the 
development of the unlimited economic power of a single agency. 
It often has the effect of setting up two or three powerful agencies 
among which a given sort of economic control is distributed. In 
education an explicit diversification is implied in any opposition to 
standardized practices. By maintaining many different kinds of 
educational institutions,
442     
THE CONTROL OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR
working in different ways and achieving different results, we gain 
the advantages of safe experimentation and avoid excessive 
emphasis on any one program. In America diversification in 
government is exemplified by the coexistence of federal, state, and 
local governments, while religious control is distributed among 
many sects.
To those who fear the misuse of a science of human behavior 
this solution dictates an obvious step. By distributing scientific 
knowledge as widely as possible, we gain some assurance that it 
will not be impounded by any one agency for its own 
aggrandizement.
Controlling control. In another attempt to solve the problem of 
control a governmental agency is given the power to limit the 
extent to which control is exercised by individuals or by other 
agencies. The possibility of controlling men through force, for 
example, is all too evident. One strong man governing through 
force alone is a small totalitarian state. When the force is 
distributed among many men, the advantages of diversification 
ensue: there is some cancellation of effect, exploitation is less 
conspicuous, and the strength of the group does not depend so 
critically upon the continuing strength of one man. But an advance 
over the mere diversification of force is achieved by a government 
which functions to "keep the peace"—to prevent any sort of 
control through the use of force. Such a government may be 
extended to other forms of control. In modern democracies, for 
example, the man in possession of great wealth is not permitted to 
control behavior in all the ways which would otherwise be open to 
him. The educator is not permitted to use the controls at his 
disposal to establish certain kinds of behavior. Religion and 
psychotherapy are not permitted to encourage or condone illegal 
behavior. Personal control is restricted by giving the individual 
redress against "undue influence."
In this solution to the problem there is no doubt where the 
ultimate control rests. But if such a government is to operate 
efficiently, it must be assigned superior power, and the problem of 
preventing its misuse remains. The problem has apparently been 
solved with respect to control through force whenever a government 
has successfully kept the peace without otherwise interfering in the 
lives of its citizens. But this result is not inevitable. Governments 
which are assigned
THE  PROBLEM OF CONTROL
443
force in order to keep the peace may use it to control citizens in 
other ways and to fight other governments. Other sorts of control 
may also be misused. A government which is able to restrict the 
control exercised by a particular agency may coerce that agency 
into supporting its own program of expansion. The totalitarian 
state begins perhaps by merely restricting the control of the 
agencies under it, but it can eventually usurp their functions. This 
has happened in the past. Does a science of behavior necessarily 
make it less likely to happen again?
A POSSIBLE SAFEGUARD 
AGAINST DESPOTISM
The ultimate strength of a controller depends upon the strength 
of those whom he controls. The wealth of a rich man depends upon 
the productivity of those whom he controls through wealth; slavery 
as a technique in the control of labor eventually proves 
nonproductive and too costly to survive. The strength of a 
government depends upon the inventiveness and productivity of its 
citizens; coercive controls which lead to inefficient or neurotic 
behavior defeat their own purpose. An agency which employs the 
stupefying practices of propaganda suffers from the ignorance and 
the restricted repertoires of those whom it controls. A culture 
which is content with the status quo—which claims to know what 
controlling practices are best and therefore does not experiment—
may achieve a temporary stability but only at the price of eventual 
extinction.
By showing how governmental practices shape the behavior of 
those governed, science may lead us more rapidly to the design of 
a government, in the broadest possible sense, which will 
necessarily promote the well-being of those who are governed. The 
maximal strength of the manpower born to a group usually requires 
conditions which are described roughly with such terms as 
freedom, security, happiness, and knowledge. In the exceptional 
case in which it does not, the criterion of survival also works in the 
interests of the governed as well as those of the government. It may 
not be purely wishful thinking to predict that this kind of strength 
will eventually take first place in the considerations of those who 
engage in the design of culture. Such an achievement would 
simply represent a special case
444     
THE CONTROL OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR
of self-control in the sense of Chapter XV. It is easy for a ruler, or 
the designer of a culture, to use any available power to achieve 
certain immediate effects. It is much more difficult to use power to 
achieve certain ultimate consequences. But every scientific 
advance which points up such consequences makes some measure 
of self-control in the design of culture more probable.
Government for the benefit of the governed is easily classified as 
an ethical or moral issue. This need not mean that governmental 
design is based upon any absolute principles of right and wrong 
but rather, as we have just seen, that it is under the control of long-
term consequences. All the examples of self-control described in 
Chapter XV could also be classified as ethical or moral problems. 
We deal with the ethics of governmental design and control as we 
deal with the ethics of any other sort of human behavior. For 
obvious reasons we call someone bad when he strikes us. Later, 
and for as obvious reasons, we call him bad when he strikes others. 
Eventually we object in more general terms to the use of physical 
force. Countermeasures become part of the ethical practices of our 
group, and religious agencies support these measures by branding 
the use of physical force immoral or sinful. All these measures 
which oppose the use of physical force are thus explained in terms 
of the immediate aversive consequences. In the design of 
government, we can, however, evaluate the use of physical force by 
considering the ultimate effect upon the group. Why should a 
particular government not slaughter the entire population of a 
captured city or country? It is part of our cultural heritage to call 
such behavior wrong and to react, perhaps in a violently emotional 
way, to the suggestion. The fact that the members of a group do 
react in this way could probably be shown to contribute ultimately 
to the strength of the group. But quite apart from such a reaction 
we may also condemn such a practice because it would eventually 
weaken the government. As we have seen, it would lead to much 
more violent resistance in other wars, to organized counterattack 
by countries afraid of meeting the same fate, and to very serious 
problems in the control of the government's own citizens. In the 
same way, although we may object to slavery because aversive 
control of one individual is also aversive to others, because
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested