c# asp.net pdf viewer : Adding page to pdf application control utility azure web page asp.net visual studio sgrfull14-part2005

119
The Effects of Physical Activity on Health and Disease
Dose
Adjustment for confounders
Main findings
response
and other comments
Nonathletes vs. athletes:
NA
Adjusted for age, family history of cancer,
RR = 1.86 (95% CI, 1.0–3.47)
age at menarche, number of pregnancies,
oral contraceptive use, smoking,
use of estrogen, leanness
Sports play of 
> 5 relative to < 5 hours/week
NA
Adjusted for age
RR = 0.96 (p value = 0.92)
Sedentary relative to most active: RR = 1.1
No
Adjusted for age; adjustment for confounders
(95% CI, 0.6–2.0) for nonrecreational;
had little effect on results; suggestive of variable
RR = 1.0 (95% CI, 0.6–1.6) for recreational
effects by menopausal status
For activity from age 30–39, high activity
Yes
Adjusted for age, menopausal status, and
quartile vs. low activity quartile, postmeno-
(opposite
potential confounders
pausal OR = 2.3 (95% CI, 1.03–5.04); pre-
direction)
menopausal OR = 2.8 (95% CI, 0.98–5.18)
> 3.8 hours/week relative to 0 hours
Yes
Adjusted for age, race, neighborhood, age at
of leisure-time activity, RR = 0.42
menarche, age at first full-term pregnancy,
(95% CI, 0.27–0.64)
number of full-term pregnancies, oral
contraceptive use, lactation, family history of
breast cancer, Quetelet index; population-based
High activity quartile relative to low activity
Yes
Adjusted for age, menopausal status, age at
quartile: RR = 1.6 (95% CI, 0.9–2.9)
(opposite
first pregnancy, parity, education, occupation,
direction)
and alcohol
> 4,000 kcal/week in physical activity
Yes
Adjusted for BMI and energy intake;
relative to none: RR = 0.73
effects observed for premenopausal and
(95% CI, 0.51–1.05)
postmenopausal cancer and for light and
vigorous activity; population-based
> daily strenuous activity relative
Yes
Adjusted for age, parity, age at first birth, family
to none: RR = 0.5 (95% CI, 0.4–0.7)
history, BMI, prior breast disease, age at
menopause, menopausal status, alcohol use,
and menopausal status x BMI; population-based
> 1,750 kcal/week relative to none:
No
Adjusted for age, education, BMI, age at
RR = 1.1 (95% CI, 0.5–2.6)
menarche, and prior pregnancy; hospital-based
Most active relative to least active:
Yes
Adjusted for age, smoking, education, live births,
RR = 1.97 (95% CI, 1.22–3.19)
(opposite
hysterectomy, and family history
direction)
Adding page to pdf - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add pages to pdf; add pages to pdf reader
Adding page to pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add pdf pages to word; adding a page to a pdf file
120
Physical Activity and Health
and young adulthood may be protective against later
development of breast cancer.
Other Hormone-Dependent Cancers in Women
Too little information is available to evaluate the
possible effect of physical activity on risk of ovarian
cancer. Zheng and colleagues (1993) found no sig-
nificant associations between occupational physical
activity and risk of ovarian cancer. On the other
hand, data from the Iowa Women’s Health Study
showed that risk of ovarian cancer among women
who were most active was twice the risk among
sedentary women (Mink et al. 1996).
Findings are limited for uterine corpus cancers as
well. Zheng et al. (1993) found no relationship
between physical activity and risk of cancer of the
uterine corpus. Among the endometrial cancer stud-
ies, one (Levi et al. 1993) found a decreased risk
associated with nonoccupational activity, and one
(Sturgeon et al. 1993) found combined recreational
and nonrecreational activity to be protective. An-
other study (Shu et al. 1993) found no protective
effect of nonoccupational activity in any age group
and a possible protective effect of occupational activ-
ity among younger women but not among older
women.
In Frisch and colleagues’ (1985) study of the
combined prevalence of cancers of the ovary, uterus,
cervix, and vagina, nonathletes were 2.5 times more
likely than former college athletes to have these
forms of cancer at follow-up. Because these cancers
have different etiologies, however, the import of this
finding is difficult to determine.
Thus the data are either too limited or too
inconsistent to firmly establish relationships be-
tween physical activity and hormone-dependent can-
cers in women. The suggestive finding that physical
activity in adolescence and early adulthood may
protect against later development of breast cancer
deserves further study.
Table 4-6.
Continued
Definition of
Definition of
Study
Population
physical activity
cancer
Endometrial cancers
Levi et al.
Switzerland/Northern
Categories of leisure-time and
Endometrial cancer
(1993)
Italy; 274 cases and 572
occupational activity
incidence
controls aged 31–75
Shu et al.
Women in Shanghai,
Occupational and nonoccupa-
Endometrial cancer
(1993)
China aged 18–74
tional physical activity index
incidence
years, 268 cases
and 268 controls
Sturgeon et al.
US women aged
Recreational and nonrecreational
Endometrial cancer
(1993)
20–74 years;
activity categories
incidence
405 cases
and 297 controls
Combined set
Frisch et al.
Cohort of former US
Athletic status during college
Cervix, uterus, ovary,
(1985 and 1987)
college athletes and
vagina cancer prevalence
nonathletes; 5,398
(n = 37)
women aged 21–80
years
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Perform annotation capabilities to mark, draw, and visualize objects on PDF document page. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program
add a page to a pdf in acrobat; add and delete pages in pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF document file page.
adding page numbers in pdf file; add page numbers to a pdf in preview
121
The Effects of Physical Activity on Health and Disease
Cancers in Men
Prostate Cancer
Among epidemiologic studies of physical activity
and cancer, prostate cancer is the second most com-
monly studied, after colorectal cancer. Results of
these studies are inconsistent. Seven studies have
investigated the association between occupational
physical activity and prostate cancer risk or mortal-
ity.  Two described significant inverse dose-response
relationships (Vena et al. 1987; Brownson et al.
1991). Two showed a nonsignificant decreased risk
with heavy occupational activity (Dosemeci et al.
1993; Thune and Lund 1994). In one publication
that presented data from two cohorts, there was no
effect in either (Paffenbarger, Hyde, Wing 1987).
The remaining study (Le Marchand, Kolonel,
Yoshizawa 1991) reported inconsistent findings by
age: increasing risk with increasing activity among
men aged 70 years or older and no relationship
among men younger than age 70.
The 10 studies of leisure-time physical activity,
or total physical activity, or cardiorespiratory fitness
and risk of prostate cancer have also produced
inconsistent results (Table 4-7). Two of the studies
described significant inverse relationships (Lee,
Paffenbarger, Hsieh 1992; Oliveria et al. 1996),
although one of these (Lee, Paffenbarger, Hsieh
1992) observed this relationship only among men
aged 70 years or older. Four studies found inverse
relationships (Albanes, Blair, Taylor 1989; Severson
et al. 1989; Yu, Harris, Wynder 1988; Thune and
Dose
Adjustment for confounders
Main findings
response
and other comments
Sedentary relative to active for total activity:
Yes
Adjusted for age, education, parity,
RR = 2.4 (95% CI, 1.0–5.8) to RR = 8.6
menopausal status, oral contraceptive use,
(95% CI, 3.0–25.3) for different ages
estrogen replacement, BMI, and caloric intake;
hospital-based
Low average adult activity quartile relative
No
Adjusted for age, number of pregnancies,
to high quartile: occupational age £ 55 years
BMI, and caloric intake; possible modification
RR = 2.5 (95% CI, 0.9–6.3), age > 55 years
of occupational activity by age;
RR = 0.6 (no CI given); nonoccupational
population-based
RR = 0.8 (95% CI, 0.5–1.3)
Sustained (lifetime) activity, inactive
No
Adjusted for age, study area, education, parity,
relative to active: recreational RR = 1.5
oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement
(95% CI, 0.7–3.2) nonrecreational RR = 1.6
use, cigarette smoking, BMI, and other type of
(95% CI, 0.7–3.3)
activity; recent activity also protective;
population-based
Nonathletes vs. athletes:
N/A
Adjusted for age, family history of cancer,
RR = 2.53 (95% CI, 1.17–5.47)
age at menarche, number of pregnancies,
oral contraceptive use, smoking, use of
estrogen, leanness
Abbreviations: BMI = body mass index (wt [kg]/ht [m]
2
); CI = confidence interval; HMO = health maintenance organization;
NHANES = National Health and Examination Survey; OR = odds ratio; RR = relative risk.
*
Excludes studies where only occupational physical activity was measured.
A dose-response relationship requires more than 2 levels of comparison. In this column, “NA” means that there were only 2 levels of
comparison; “No” means that there were more than 2 levels but no dose-response gradient was found; “Yes” means that there were
more than 2 levels and a dose-response gradient was found.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page modifying page, you will find detailed guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting
add multi page pdf to word document; adding page numbers to pdf in
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages to a PDF from a supported file format, with customized options.
adding a page to a pdf in preview; add page number pdf file
122
Physical Activity and Health
Table 4-7. . Epidemiologic studies of leisure-time or total physical activity or cardiorespiratory fitness and
prostate cancer
Definition of physical activity
Definition of
Study
Population
or cardiorespiratory fitness
cancer
Physical activity
Polednak (1976)
Cohort of 8,393 former
College athletic status, major,
Prostate cancer incidence
US college men
minor, and nonathletes
(n = 124)
Paffenbarger,
Cohort of 51,977
Sports play
Prostate cancer incidence
Hyde, Wing
US male former
and mortality (n = 154 )
(1987)
college students
16,936 US male alumni
Physical activity index
Prostate cancer mortality
aged 35–74 years
(n = 36)
Yu, Harris,
US men, all ages,
Categories of leisure-time
Prostate cancer incidence
Wynder
1,162 cases and
aerobic exercise
(1988)
3,124 controls
Albanes, Blair,
NHANES cohort of
Categories of recreational and
Prostate cancer incidence
Taylor (1989)
5,141 US men aged
nonrecreational activity
25–74 years
Severson et al.
Cohort of 7,925
Physical activity index from
Prostate cancer incidence
(1989)
Japanese men
Framingham study and heart rate
in Hawaii aged
46–65 years
West et al. (1991)
Utah men aged 45–74
Categories of energy expended
Prostate cancer incidence
years, 358 cases
and 679 controls
Lee, Paffenbarger,
Cohort of US college
Physical activity index based on
Prostate cancer incidence
Hsieh (1992)
alumni, 17,719 men
stair climbing, walking, playing
(n = 221)
aged 30–79 years
sports
Thune and Lund
Cohort of Norwegian
Recreational and occupational
Prostate cancer incidence
(1994)
43,685 men
activity based on questionnaire;
(n = 220)
categories of occupational and
leisure-time activity
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
Oliveria et al.
Cohort of 12,975
Maximal exercise test
Prostate cancer incidence
(1996)
Texas men
or mortality (n = 94)
aged 20–80 years
Cohort of 7,570
Categories of weekly energy
Prostate cancer incidence
Texas men
expenditure in leisure time
or mortality (n = 44)
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
add page numbers pdf files; add a page to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
VB.NET PDF - Insert Text to PDF Document in VB.NET. Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program.
adding pages to a pdf; adding page numbers to pdf
123
The Effects of Physical Activity on Health and Disease
Dose
Adjustment for confounders
Main findings
response*
and other comments
Major athletes relative to nonathletes,
No
None
RR = 1.64 (p < 0.05)
Sports play ‡ 5 relative to < 5 hours/week,
NA
Adjusted for age (2 levels of activity)
RR = 1.66; (p < 0.05)
Comparing ‡ 2,000 with < 500 kcal/week,
No
Adjusted for age, BMI, and smoking
RR = 0.57; p = 0.33
Most sedentary relative to most active
Yes
Adjusted for age; in multivariate analysis,
menduring leisure time,
findings no longer significant for whites;
RR = 1.3 (95% CI, 1.0–1.6) for whites,
hospital based
RR = 1.4 (95% CI, 0.8–2.6) for blacks
Least active relative to most
Adjusted for age; further adjustment for
active individuals,
confounders said to not affect results
RR = 1.3 (95% CI, 0.7–2.4);
No
for nonrecreational
RR = 1.8 (95% CI, 1.0–3.3);
Yes
for recreational
RR = 1.8 (95% CI, 1.0–3.3)
No
Most active relative to least active men,
Adjusted for age, BMI
RR = 1.05 (95% CI, 0.73–1.51);
NA
for occupation,
RR = 0.77 (95% CI, 0.58–1.01);
No
high heart rate relative to low,
RR = 0.97 (95% CI, 0.69–1.36)
NA
Overall no association found
For agressive tumors, physical activity was
associated with increased risk, but this was
not statistically significant
Men aged ‡ 70 years: comparing > 4,000
No
Adjusted for age; no effect of activity at
with < 1,000 kcal/week; RR = 0.53
2,500 kcal, the level found protective
(95% CI, 0.29–0.95); men aged < 70 years,
for colon cancer
RR = 1.21 (95% CI, 0.8–0.18)
Heavy occupational activity relative to
No
Adjusted for age, BMI, and geographic region
sedentary, RR = 0.81 (95% CI, 0.50–1.30);
regular training in leisure time relative to
sedentary, RR = 0.87 (95% CI, 0.57–1.34)
Among men < 60 years, most fit relative to
Yes
Adjusted for age, BMI, and smoking
least fit, RR =  0.26 (95% CI, 0.10–0.63);
among men > 60 years, no effect, RR not given
No
Adjusted for age, BMI, and smoking
‡ 3,000 kcal/week relative to < 1,000
No
Adjusted for age, BMI, and smoking
kcal/week, RR = 0.37 (95% CI, 0.14–0.98)
Abbreviations: BMI = body mass index (wt [kg]/ht [m]
2
); CI = confidence interval; RR = relative risk.
*A dose-response relationship requires more than 2 levels of comparison. In this column, “NA” means that there were only 2 levels of
comparison; “No” means that there were more than 2 levels but no dose-response gradient was found; “Yes” means that there were more
than 2 levels and a dose-response gradient was found.
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
text comments on PDF page using C# demo code in Visual Stuodio .NET class. C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide users with examples for adding text box
adding page numbers to a pdf document; add page numbers to pdf files
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# program. Perform annotation capabilities to mark, draw, and visualize objects on PDF document page.
add page numbers to pdf reader; add page numbers to pdf document in preview
124
Physical Activity and Health
Lund 1994), but these were not statistically signifi-
cant, and one of the four (Thune and Lund 1994)
showed this relationship only for those aged 60 years
or older. Two studies found that men who had been
athletically active in college had significantly in-
creased risks of later developing prostate cancer
(Polednak 1976; Paffenbarger, Hyde, Wing 1987).
One study found no overall association between
physical activity and prostate cancer risk but found
a higher risk (although not statistically significant)
of more aggressive prostate cancer (West et al. 1991).
The two studies of the association of cardiorespi-
ratory fitness with prostate cancer incidence were
also inconsistent. Severson and colleagues (1989)
found no association between resting pulse rate and
subsequent risk of prostate cancer. Oliveria and col-
leagues (1996) found a strong inverse dose-response
relationship between fitness assessed by time on a
treadmill and subsequent risk of prostate cancer.
Thus the body of research conducted to date
shows no consistent relationship between prostate
cancer and physical activity.
Testicular Cancer
Two studies investigated physical activity and risk of
developing testicular cancer; again, results are in-
consistent. A case-control study in England found
that men who spent at least 15 hours per week in
recreational physical activity had approximately half
the risk of sedentary men, and a significant trend was
reported over six categories of total time spent exer-
cising (United Kingdom Testicular Cancer Study
Group 1994). A cohort study in Norway (Thune and
Lund 1994) was limited by few cases. It showed no
association between leisure-time physical activity
and risk of testicular cancer, but heavy manual
occupational activity was associated with an ap-
proximately twofold increase in risk, although this
result was not statistically significant. Thus no mean-
ingful conclusions about a relationship between
physical activity and testicular cancer can be drawn.
Other Site-Specific Cancers
Few epidemiologic studies have examined the asso-
ciation of physical activity with other site-specific
cancers (Lee 1994). The totality of evidence provides
little basis for a suggestion of a relationship.
Biologic Plausibility
Because the data presented in this section demon-
strate a clear association only between physical ac-
tivity and colon cancer, the biologic plausibility of
this relationship is the focus of this section. The
alteration of local prostaglandin synthesis may serve
as a mechanism through which physical activity may
confer protection against colon cancer (Shephard et
al. 1991; Lee 1994; Cordain, Latin, Beanke 1986).
Strenuous physical activity increases prostaglandin
F
2
alpha, which strongly increases intestinal motil-
ity, and may suppress prostaglandin E
2
, which re-
duces intestinal motility and, released in greater
quantities by colon tumor cells than normal cells,
accelerates the rate of colon cell proliferation (Thor
et al. 1985; Tutton and Barkla 1980). It has been
hypothesized that physical activity decreases gas-
trointestinal transit time, which in turn decreases
the length of contact between the colon mucosa and
potential carcinogens, cocarcinogens, or promoters
contained in the fecal stream (Shephard 1993; Lee
1994). This hypothesis could partly explain why
physical activity has been associated with reduced
cancer risk in the colon but not in the rectum.
Physical activity may shorten transit time within
segments of the colon without affecting transit time
in the rectum. Further, the rectum is only intermit-
tently filled with fecal material before evacuation.
Despite these hypothetical mechanisms, studies on
the effects of physical activity on gastrointestinal
transit time in humans have yielded inconsistent
results (Shephard 1993; Lee 1994).
Conclusions
The relative consistency of findings in epidemio-
logic studies indicates that physical activity is asso-
ciated with a reduced risk of colon cancer, and
biologically plausible mechanisms underlying this
association have been described. The data consis-
tently show no association between physical activ-
ity and rectal cancer. Data regarding a relationship
between physical activity and breast, endometrial,
ovarian, prostate, and testicular cancers are too
limited or too inconsistent to support any firm
conclusions. The suggestion that physical activity
in adolescence and early adulthood may protect
against later development of breast cancer clearly
deserves further study.
125
The Effects of Physical Activity on Health and Disease
Non–Insulin-Dependent
Diabetes Mellitus
An estimated 8 million Americans (about 3 percent of
the U.S. population) have been diagnosed with diabe-
tes mellitus, and it is estimated that twice that many
have diabetes but do not know it (Harris 1995).  More
than 169,000 deaths per year are attributed to diabetes
as the underlying cause, making it the seventh leading
cause of mortality in the United States (NCHS 1994).
This figure, however, underestimates the actual death
toll: in 1993, more than twice this number of deaths
occurred among persons for whom diabetes was listed
as a secondary diagnosis on the death certificate.
Many of these deaths were the result of complications
of diabetes, particularly CVDs, including CHD, stroke,
peripheral vascular disease, and congestive heart fail-
ure. Diabetes accounts for at least 10 percent of all
acute hospital days and in 1992 accounted for an
estimated $92 billion in direct and indirect medical
costs (Rubin et al. 1993). In addition, by age 65 years,
about 40 percent of the general population has im-
paired glucose tolerance, which increases the risk of
CVD (Harris et al. 1987).
Diabetes is a heterogeneous group of metabolic
disorders that have in common elevated blood glucose
and associated metabolic derangements. Insulin-
dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM, or type I) is
characterized by an absolute deficiency of circulat-
ing insulin caused by destruction of pancreatic beta
islet cells, thought to have occurred by an auto-
immune process. Non–insulin-dependent diabetes
mellitus (NIDDM, or type II) is characterized either
by elevated insulin levels that are ineffective in
normalizing blood glucose levels because of insulin
resistance (decreased sensitivity to insulin), largely
in skeletal muscle, or by impaired insulin secretion.
More than 90 percent of persons with diabetes have
NIDDM (Krall and Beaser 1989).
Nonmodifiable biologic factors implicated in the
etiology of NIDDM include a strong genetic influence
and advanced age, but the development of insulin
resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose intoler-
ance are related to a modifiable factor: weight gain in
adults, particularly in those persons in whom fat
accumulates around the waist, abdomen, and upper
body and within the abdominal cavity (this is also
called the android or central distribution pattern)
(Harris et al. 1987).
Physical Activity and NIDDM
Considerable evidence supports a relationship be-
tween physical inactivity and NIDDM (Kriska, Blair,
Pereira 1994; Zimmet 1992; King and Kriska 1992;
Kriska and Bennett 1992). Early suggestions of a
relationship emerged from the observation that soci-
eties that had discontinued their traditional lifestyles
(which presumably included large amounts of regu-
lar physical activity) experienced major increases in
the prevalence of NIDDM (West 1978). Additional
evidence for the importance of lifestyle was provided
by comparison studies demonstrating that groups of
people who migrated to a more technologically ad-
vanced environment had higher prevalences of
NIDDM than their ethnic counterparts who remained
in their native land (Hara et al. 1983; Kawate et al.
1979; Ravussin et al. 1994) and that rural dwellers
had a lower prevalence of diabetes than their urban
counterparts (Cruz-Vidal et al. 1979; Zimmet 1981;
Taylor et al. 1983; King, Taylor, Zimmet, et al. 1984).
Many cross-sectional studies have found physi-
cal inactivity to be significantly associated with
NIDDM (Taylor et al. 1983; Taylor et al. 1984; King,
Taylor, Zimmet, et al. 1984; Dowse et al. 1991;
Ramaiya et al. 1991; Kriska, Gregg, et al. 1993; Chen
and Lowenstein 1986; Frish et al. 1986; Holbrook,
Barrett-Connor, Wingard 1989). Cross-sectional
studies that have examined the relationship between
physical activity and glucose intolerance in persons
without diabetes have generally found that after a
meal, glucose levels (Lindgärde and Saltin 1981;
Cederholm and Wibell 1985; Wang et al. 1989;
Schranz et al. 1991; Dowse et al. 1991; Kriska,
LaPorte, et al. 1993) and insulin values (Lindgärde
and Saltin 1981; Wang et al. 1989; McKeigue et al.
1992; Feskens, Loeber, Kromhout 1994; Regensteiner
et al. 1995) were significantly higher in less active
than in more active persons. However, some cross-
sectional studies did not find that physical inactivity
was consistently associated with NIDDM in either
the entire population or in all subgroups (King,
Taylor, Zimmet, et al. 1984; Dowse et al. 1991;
Kriska, Gregg, et al. 1993; Montoye et al. 1977;
Taylor et al. 1983; Fisch et al. 1987; Jarrett, Shipley,
Hunt 1986; Levitt et al. 1993; Harris 1991). For
example, the Second National Health and Nutrition
Examination Survey and the Hispanic Health and
Nutrition Examination Survey found that higher
126
Physical Activity and Health
levels of occupational physical activity among
Mexican Americans were associated with less NIDDM
(Harris 1991). However, in contrast to findings from
the First National Health and Nutrition Examination
Survey (Chen and Lewenstein 1986), this associa-
tion was not found for either occupational or leisure-
time physical activity among blacks or whites.
Two case-control studies have found physical
inactivity to be significantly associated with NIDDM
(Kaye et al. 1991; Uusitupa et al. 1985). One was a
population-based nested case-control study, in which
women aged 55–69 years who had high levels of
physical activity were found to be half as likely to
develop NIDDM as were same-aged women with low
levels of physical activity (age-adjusted OR = 0.5;
95% CI, 0.4–0.7) (Kaye et al. 1991). Moderately
active women had an intermediate risk (OR = 0.7;
95% CI, 0.5–0.9).
Prospective cohort studies of college alumni,
female registered nurses, and male physicians have
demonstrated that physical activity protects against
the development of NIDDM (Table 4-8). A study of
male university alumni (Helmrich et al. 1991) dem-
onstrated that physical activity was inversely related
to the incidence of NIDDM, a relationship that was
particularly evident in men at high risk for develop-
ing diabetes (defined as those with a high BMI, a
history of high blood pressure, or a parental history
of diabetes). Each 500 kilocalories of additional
leisure-time physical activity per week was associ-
ated with a 6 percent decrease in risk (adjusted for
age, BMI, history of high blood pressure, and paren-
tal history of diabetes) of developing NIDDM. This
study showed a more pronounced benefit from vig-
orous sports than from stair climbing or walking. In
a study of female registered nurses aged 34–59 years,
women who reported engaging in vigorous physical
activity at least once a week had a 16 percent lower
adjusted relative risk of self-reported NIDDM during
the 8 years of follow-up than women who reported
no vigorous physical activity (Manson et al. 1991).
Similar findings were observed between physical
activity and incidence of NIDDM in a 5-year pro-
spective study of male physicians 40–84 years of age
Table 4-8. . Cohort studies of association of physical activity with non–insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
(NIDDM)
Definition of
Definition of
Study
Population
physical activity
NIDDM
Helmrich et al.
Male college alumni
Leisure-time physical activity
Self-reported physician-
(1991)
(walking, stair climbing, and
diagnosed diabetes
sports)
Manson et al.
Female nurses
Single questions regarding number
Self-reported diagnosed
(1991)
of times per week of vigorous
diabetes, confirmed by
activity
classic symptoms plus
fasting plasma glucose
‡ 140 mg/dl; two elevated
plasma glucose levels on
two different occasions;
hypoglycemic medication
use
Manson et al.
Male physicians
Single questions regarding number
Self-reported physician-
(1992)
of times per week of vigorous
diagnosed diabetes
activity
127
The Effects of Physical Activity on Health and Disease
(Manson et al. 1992). Although the incidence of
diabetes was self-reported in these cohorts, concerns
about accuracy are somewhat mitigated by the fact
that these were studies of health professionals and
college-educated persons. In these three cohort stud-
ies, two found an inverse dose-response gradient of
physical activity and the development of NIDDM
(Helmrich et al. 1991; Manson et al. 1992).
In a feasibility study in Malmo, Sweden, physical
activity was included as part of an intervention
strategy to prevent diabetes among persons with
impaired glucose tolerance (Eriksson and Lindgärde
1991). At the end of 5 years of follow-up, twice as
many in the control group as in the intervention
group had developed diabetes. The lack of random
assignment of participants, however, limits the
generalizability of this finding. A study conducted in
Daqing, China, also included physical activity as an
intervention to prevent diabetes among persons with
impaired glucose tolerance (Pan, Li,  Hu 1995). After
6 years of follow-up, 8.3 cases per 100 person-years
occurred in the exercise intervention group and 15.7
cases per 100 person-years in the control group.
It has been recommended that an appropriate
exercise program may be added to diet or drug
therapy to improve blood glucose control and re-
duce certain cardiovascular risk factors among per-
sons with diabetes (American Diabetes Association
1990). Diet and exercise have been found to be most
effective for controlling NIDDM in persons who
have mild disease and are not taking medications
(Barnard, Jung, Inkeles 1994). However, excessive
physical activity can sometimes cause persons with
diabetes (particularly those who take insulin for
blood glucose control) to experience detrimental
effects, such as worsening of hyperglycemia and keto-
sis from poorly controlled diabetes, hypoglycemia
(insulin-reaction) either during vigorous physical
activity or—more commonly—several hours after
prolonged physical activity, complications from pro-
liferative retinopathy (e.g., detached retina), compli-
cations from superficial foot injuries, and a risk of
myocardial infarction and sudden death, particularly
among older people with NIDDM and advanced, but
silent, coronary atherosclerosis. These risks can be
minimized by a preexercise medical evaluation and
by taking proper precautions (Leon 1989, 1992). To
Dose
Adjustment for confounder
Main findings
response*
and other comments
0.94 (95% CI, 0.90–0.98) or 6% decrease in
Yes
Adjusted for age, BMI, hypertension
NIDDM for each 500 kcal increment
history, parental history of diabetes
0.84 (95% CI, 0.75–0.94) for ‡ 1 time
No
Adjusted for age, BMI, family history
per week vs. < 1 time per week
of diabetes, smoking, alcohol consumption,
vigorous activity
hypertension history, cholesterol history,
family of history coronary heart disease
0.71 (95% CI, 0.54–0.94) for ‡ 1 time per
Yes
Adjusted for age, BMI, smoking, alcohol
week vs. < 1 time per week vigorous
consumption, reported blood pressure,
activity
hypertension history, cholesterol history,
parental history of myocardial infarction
Abbreviations: BMI = body mass index (wt [kg]/ht [m]2 ); CI = confidence interval.
*A dose-response relationship requires more than 2 levels of comparison. In this column, “NA” means that there were only 2 levels of
comparison; “No” means that there were more than 2 levels but no dose-response gradient was found; “Yes” means that there were
more than 2 levels and a dose-response gradient was found.
128
Physical Activity and Health
reduce risk of hypoglycemic episodes, persons with
diabetes who take insulin or oral hypoglycemic drugs
must closely monitor their blood glucose levels and
make appropriate adjustments in insulin or oral hy-
poglycemic drug dosage, food intake, and timing of
physical activity sessions.
Biologic Plausibility
Numerous reviews of the short- and long-term
effects of physical activity on carbohydrate metabo-
lism and glucose tolerance describe the physiologi-
cal basis for a relationship (Björntorp and Krotkiewski
1985; Koivisto, Yki-Järvinen, DeFronzo 1986;
Lampman and Schteingart 1991; Horton 1991;
Wallberg-Henriksson 1992; Leon 1992; Richter,
Ruderman, Schneider 1981; Harris et al. 1987).
During a single prolonged session of physical activ-
ity, contracting skeletal muscle appears to have a
synergistic effect with insulin in enhancing glucose
uptake into the cells. This effect appears to be related
to both increased blood flow in the muscle and
enhanced glucose transport into the muscle cell.
This enhancement persists for 24 hours or more as
glycogen levels in the muscle are being replenished.
Such observations suggest that many of the effects of
regular physical activity are due to the overlapping
effects of individual physical activity sessions and
are thus independent of long-term adaptations to
exercise training or changes in body composition
(Harris et al. 1987).
In general, studies of exercise training have
suggested that physical activity helps prevent NIDDM
by increasing sensitivity to insulin (Saltin et al. 1979;
Lindgärde, Malmquist, Balke 1983; Krotkiewski
1983; Trovati et al. 1984; Schneider et al. 1984;
Rönnemaa et al. 1986). These studies suggest that
physical activity is more likely to improve abnormal
glucose tolerance when the abnormality is primarily
caused by insulin resistance than when it is caused
by deficient amounts of circulating insulin (Holloszy
et al. 1986). Thus, physical activity is likely to be
most beneficial in preventing the progression of
NIDDM during the earlier stages of the disease
process, before insulin therapy is required. Evidence
supporting this theory includes intervention pro-
grams that promote physical activity together with a
low-fat diet high in complex carbohydrates (Barnard,
Jung, Inkeles 1994) or programs that promote diet
alone (Nagulesparan et al. 1981). These studies have
shown that diet and physical activity interventions
are much less beneficial for persons with NIDDM
who require insulin therapy than for those who do
not yet take any medication or those who take only
oral medications for blood glucose control.
Cross-sectional studies also show that, com-
pared with their sedentary counterparts, endurance
athletes and exercise-trained animals have greater
insulin sensitivity, as evidenced by a lower plasma
insulin concentration at a similar plasma glucose
concentration, and increased 
I21
I-insulin binding to
white blood cells and adipocytes (Koivisto et al.
1979).  Insulin sensitivity and rate of glucose dis-
posal are related to cardiorespiratory fitness even in
older persons (Hollenbeck et al. 1984). Resistance or
strength-training exercise has also been reported to
have beneficial effects on glucose-insulin dynamics
in some, but not all, studies involving persons who
do not have diabetes (Goldberg 1989; Kokkinos et
al. 1988). Much of the effect of physical activity
appears to be due to the metabolic adaptation of
skeletal muscle. However, exercise training may
contribute to improved glucose disposal and glucose-
insulin dynamics in both adipose tissue and the
working skeletal muscles (Leon 1989, 1992; Gudat,
Berger, Lefèbvre 1994; Horton 1991).
In addition, exercise training may reduce other
risk factors for atherosclerosis (e.g., blood lipid
abnormalities and elevated blood pressure levels), as
discussed previously in this chapter, and thereby
decrease the risk of macrovascular or atherosclerotic
complications of diabetes (Leon 1991a).
Lastly, physical activity may prevent or delay the
onset of NIDDM by reducing total body fat or specifi-
cally intra-abdominal fat, a known risk factor for
insulin resistance. As discussed later in this chapter,
physical activity is inversely associated with obesity
and intra-abdominal fat distribution, and recent
studies have demonstrated that physical training can
reduce these body fat stores (Björntorp, Sjöström,
Sullivan 1979; Brownell and Stunkard 1980; Després
et al. 1988; Krotkiewski 1988).
Conclusions
The epidemiologic literature strongly supports a
protective effect of physical activity on the likeli-
hood of developing NIDDM in the populations
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested