c# asp.net pdf viewer : Add page number to pdf reader software control dll windows web page azure web forms sgrfull20-part2012

179
Patterns and Trends in Physical Activity
Figure 5-1.   Percentage of adults aged 18+ years reporting no participation in leisure-time physical activity by 
sex and age
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
75+
65–74
45–64
30–44
18–29
NHANES Women
1988–1991
NHANES Men
1988–1991
NHIS Women
1991
NHIS Men
1991
BRFSS Women
1992
BRFSS Men
1992
Survey–sex group
Percent
Figure 5-2.   Percentage of adults aged 18+ years reporting no participation in leisure-time physical activity  
by month
Monthly trend within survey
Percent
January
December
January
December
0
10
20
30
40
1992 BRFSS
1991 NHIS
Add page number to pdf reader - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add pages to pdf file; add pages to pdf without acrobat
Add page number to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page to existing pdf file; add page pdf
180
Physical Activity and Health
moderate physical activity requiring sustained,
rhythmic muscular movements for at least 30 min-
utes per day (USDHHS 1990). Regular, sustained
activity derived from the NHIS and the BRFSS was
defined as any type or intensity of activity that
occurs 5 times or more per week and 30 minutes or
more per occasion (see Appendix B ). This defini-
tion approximates the activity goal of the Healthy
People 2000 objective but includes vigorous activity
of at least 30 minutes duration as well. Comparable
information was unavailable in the NHANES III.
The percentage of U.S. adults meeting this defini-
tion of regular, sustained activity during leisure
time was about 22 percent in the two surveys
(23.5 in the NHIS and 20.1 in the BRFSS; see
Table 5-4)—8 percentage points lower than the
Healthy People 2000 target.
The prevalence of regular, sustained activity
was somewhat higher among men than women;
male:female ratios were 1.1:1.3. The two surveys
found no consistent association between racial/
ethnic groups and participation in regular, sustained
activity. The prevalence of regular, sustained activity
tended to be higher among 18- through 29-year-olds
than among other age groups, and it was lowest (£ 15
percent) among women aged 75 years and older.
Education and income levels were associated posi-
tively with regular, sustained activity. For example,
adults with a college education had an approxi-
mately 50 percent higher prevalence of regular, sus-
tained activity than those with fewer than 12 years of
Table 5-3. Percentage of adults aged 18+ years reporting participation in no activity; regular, sustained
activity; and regular, vigorous activity, by state,* Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
(BRFSS), 1994, United States
Regular,
Regular,
No activity
sustained activity
vigorous activity
Overall
29.4 (29.0,29.8)
19.7(19.3,20.1)
14.0(13.6,14.4)
Alabama
45.9 (43.2,48.6)
17.1(14.9,19.3)
11.2 (9.4,13.0)
Alaska
22.8 (19.9,25.7)
28.3(24.8,31.8)
15.1(12.4,17.8)
Arizona
23.7 (21.2,26.2)
17.8(15.4,20.2)
17.9(15.4,20.4)
Arkansas
35.1 (32.6,37.6)
17.2(15.0,19.4)
10.7 (9.1,12.3)
California
21.8 (20.2,23.4)
21.9(20.3,23.5)
15.7(14.5,16.9)
Colorado
17.2 (15.0,19.4)
26.5(24.1,28.9)
15.9(14.1,17.7)
Connecticut
22.1 (19.9,24.3)
26.9(24.5,29.3)
16.9(14.9,18.9)
Delaware
36.4 (34.0,38.8)
17.7(15.7,19.7)
14.1(12.5,15.7)
D.C.
48.6 (45.3,51.9)
11.6 (9.4,13.8)
8.7 (6.9,10.5)
Florida
28.0 (26.2,29.8)
23.8(22.2,25.4)
20.0(18.6,21.4)
Georgia
33.0 (30.6,35.4)
18.0(16.0,20.0)
13.5(11.9,15.1)
Hawaii
20.8 (18.6,23.0)
25.5(23.3,27.7)
18.3(16.3,20.3)
Idaho
21.9 (19.7,24.1)
26.3(23.8,28.8)
15.7(13.7,17.7)
Illinois
33.5 (31.1,35.9)
15.7(13.9,17.5)
14.6(12.8,16.4)
Indiana
29.7 (27.7,31.7)
18.8(17.0,20.6)
13.0(11.4,14.6)
Iowa
33.2 (31.2,35.2)
15.9(14.3,17.5)
13.3(11.9,14.7)
Kansas
34.5 (31.8,37.2)
16.8(14.6,19.0)
13.9(11.9,15.9)
Kentucky
45.9 (43.5,48.3)
13.2 (11.6,14.8)
11.3 (9.9,12.7)
Louisiana
33.5 (30.8,36.2)
16.8(14.8,18.8)
11.3 (9.5,13.1)
Maine
40.7 (37.8,43.6)
13.0 (11.0,15.0)
11.3 (9.5,13.1)
Maryland
30.5 (28.9,32.1)
17.6(16.2,19.0)
14.5(13.3,15.7)
Massachusetts
24.0 (21.6,26.4)
23.2(21.0,25.4)
17.4(15.4,19.4)
Michigan
23.1 (21.1,25.1)
21.8(19.8,23.8)
14.5(12.9,16.1)
Minnesota
21.8 (20.4,23.2)
20.1(18.7,21.5)
15.4(14.2,16.6)
Mississippi
38.5 (35.6,41.4)
14.0(12.0,16.0)
9.8 (8.2,11.4)
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
pageIndex, The page index of the PDF page that will be 0
add a page to a pdf; add multi page pdf to word document
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
If your page number is set as 1, then the two output PDF files will contains the first page and the later three pages Add necessary references:
add page to pdf reader; add page numbers to pdf document in preview
181
Patterns and Trends in Physical Activity
education. Among the regions of the United States,
the West tended to have the highest prevalence of
adults participating in regular, sustained activity
(Table 5-4). Regular, sustained activity, which com-
prises many outdoor activities, was most prevalent in
the summer. In the 1994 BRFSS, state-specific
prevalences of regular, sustained activity ranged
from 11.6 to 28.3 (Table 5-3).
Regular, Vigorous Physical Activity during
Leisure Time
People who exercise both regularly and vigorously
would be expected to improve cardiovascular fitness
the most. The NHIS and the BRFSS defined regular,
vigorous physical activity as rhythmic contraction of
large muscle groups, performed at 50 percent or more
of estimated age- and sex-specific maximum cardio-
respiratory capacity, 3 times per week or more for at
least 20 minutes per occasion (see Appendix B). The
prevalence of regular, vigorous leisure-time activ-
ity reported by U.S. adults was about 15 percent
(16.4 percent in the 1991 NHIS and 14.2 percent in
the 1992 BRFSS; see Table 5-5). This prevalence is
lower than the goal stated in Healthy People 2000
objective 1.4, which is to have at least 20 percent of
people aged 18 years and older engage in vigorous
physical activity at 50 percent or more of individual
cardiorespiratory capacity 3 days or more per week
for 20 minutes or more per occasion (USDHHS
1990).
Table 5-3.
Continued
Regular,
Regular,
No activity
sustained activity
vigorous activity
Missouri
32.0 (29.3,34.7)
18.0(15.8,20.2)
10.8 (9.0,12.6)
Montana
21.0 (18.6,23.4)
21.8(19.3,24.3)
15.0(12.6,17.4)
Nebraska
24.3 (22.1,26.5)
16.7(14.7,18.7)
14.7(12.9,16.5)
Nevada
21.7 (19.5,23.9)
25.3(22.9,27.7)
14.1(12.3,15.9)
New Hampshire
25.8 (23.3,28.3)
21.2(19.0,23.4)
17.0(14.8,19.2)
New Jersey
30.9 (28.2,33.6)
20.7(18.3,23.1)
11.6 (9.8,13.4)
New Mexico
19.8 (17.3,22.3)
25.5(22.6,28.4)
18.4(16.0,20.8)
New York
37.1 (34.7,39.5)
14.8(13.2,16.4)
10.6 (9.2,12.0)
North Carolina
42.8 (40.3,45.3)
12.7 (11.1,14.3)
9.3 (7.9,10.7)
North Dakota
32.0 (29.6,34.4)
20.2(18.0,22.4)
13.9(12.1,15.7)
Ohio
38.0 (35.1,40.9)
15.9(13.7,18.1)
12.4(10.4,14.4)
Oklahoma
30.4 (28.0,32.8)
23.0(20.8,25.2)
11.1 (9.5,12.7)
Oregon
20.8 (19.2,22.4)
27.3(25.3,29.3)
18.7(17.1,20.3)
Pennsylvania
26.5 (24.9,28.1)
21.2(19.6,22.8)
14.5(13.3,15.7)
South Carolina
31.4 (29.2,33.6)
15.1(13.3,16.9)
11.9(10.3,13.5)
South Dakota
30.8 (28.4,33.2)
19.4(17.4,21.4)
11.9(10.3,13.5)
Tennessee
39.7 (37.7,41.7)
15.0(13.6,16.4)
12.7(11.3,14.1)
Texas
27.8 (25.1,30.5)
20.7(18.2,23.2)
13.0(11.0,15.0)
Utah
21.0 (18.8,23.2)
21.6(19.4,23.8)
14.3(12.5,16.1)
Vermont
23.3 (21.5,25.1)
25.7(23.7,27.7)
18.4(16.6,20.2)
Virginia
23.0 (20.6,25.4)
24.6(22.2,27.0)
14.6(12.8,16.4)
Washington
18.2 (16.8,19.6)
25.7(24.1,27.3)
16.8(15.4,18.2)
West Virginia
45.3 (43.1,47.5)
14.3(12.7,15.9)
9.8 (8.4,11.2)
Wisconsin
25.9 (23.2,28.6)
22.7(20.2,25.2)
12.7(10.7,14.7)
Wyoming
20.9 (18.4,23.4)
27.9(24.8,31.0)
16.3(13.9,18.7)
Source:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, BRFSS, 1994.
*Includes 49 states and the District of Columbia. Data for Rhode Island were unavailable.
95% confidence intervals.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages Add necessary references
add page number to pdf in preview; add page number pdf file
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Add necessary references: Description: Search specified string from all the PDF pages. eg: The first page is 0. 0
add page to a pdf; add pages to pdf acrobat
182
Physical Activity and Health
Table 5-4. . Percentage of adults aged 18+ years reporting participation in regular, sustained physical activity
(5+ times per week for 30+ minutes per occasion), by various demographic characteristics,
National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS),
United States
Demographic group
1991 NHIS*
1992 BRFSS*
Overall
23.5 (22.9, 24.1)
20.1 (19.7, 20.5)
Sex
Males
26.6 (25.7, 27.5)
21.5 (20.9, 22.1)
Females
20.7 (19.9, 21.5)
18.9 (18.4, 19.3)
Race/Ethnicity
White, non-Hispanic
24.0 (23.2, 24.7)
20.8 (20.4, 21.2)
Males
26.7 (25.7, 27.6)
21.9 (21.3, 22.5)
Females
21.5 (20.6, 22.4)
19.8 (19.2, 20.4)
Black, non-Hispanic
22.9 (21.4, 24.4)
15.2 (14.0, 16.4)
Males
28.9 (26.6, 31.3)
18.5 (16.5, 20.5)
Females
18.0 (16.2, 19.8)
12.6 (11.4, 13.8)
Hispanic
20.0 (18.1, 21.9)
20.1 (18.5, 21.7)
Males
23.7 (20.6, 26.7)
21.4 (18.9, 23.9)
Females
16.5 (14.3, 18.7)
18.9 (16.7, 21.1)
Other
23.4 (20.5, 26.2)
17.3 (15.1, 19.5)
Males
25.5 (21.0, 30.0)
19.7 (16.6, 22.8)
Females
21.1 (17.7, 24.6)
14.5 (12.0, 17.0)
Age (years)
Males
18–29
32.0 (30.2, 33.7)
26.8 (25.4, 28.2)
30–44
24.1 (22.8, 25.3)
17.4 (16.6, 18.2)
45–64
24.2 (22.8, 25.6)
18.9 (17.7, 20.1)
65–74
29.2 (27.0, 31.4)
26.8 (24.8, 28.8)
75+
24.6 (21.8, 27.4)
23.2 (20.5, 25.9)
Females
18–29
23.2 (21.6, 24.8)
19.9 (18.7, 21.1)
30–44
20.4 (19.4, 21.4)
18.5 (17.7, 19.3)
45–64
20.6 (19.4, 21.8)
19.4 (18.4, 20.4)
65–74
21.3 (19.5, 23.0)
19.0 (17.6, 20.4)
75+
13.8 (12.2, 15.4)
15.0 (13.4, 16.6)
Education
< 12 yrs
18.1 (17.0, 19.2)
15.6 (14.6, 16.6)
12 yrs
21.9 (21.0, 22.7)
17.8 (17.2, 18.4)
Some college (13–15 yrs)
26.8 (25.7, 28.0)
22.7 (21.9, 23.5)
College (16+ yrs)
28.5 (27.3, 29.6)
23.5 (22.7, 24.3)
Income§
< $10,000
23.6 (21.8, 25.5)
17.6 (16.6, 18.6)
$10,000–19,999
20.4 (19.3, 21.4)
18.7 (17.9, 19.5)
$20,000–34,999
23.2 (22.2, 24.2)
20.3 (19.5, 21.1)
$35,000–49,999
23.9 (22.7, 25.1)
20.9 (19.9, 21.9)
$50,000+
28.0 (26.8, 29.2)
23.5 (22.5, 24.5)
Geographic region
Northeast
23.9 (22.8, 25.0)
20.2 (19.2, 21.2)
North Central
24.2 (22.7, 25.6)
18.2 (17.4, 19.0)
South
21.1 (19.9, 22.2)
19.0 (18.4, 19.6)
West
26.1 (24.6, 27.5)
24.0 (23.0, 25.0)
Sources:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, NHIS, public use data tapes, 1991; Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, BRFSS, 1992.
*Based on data from 48 states and the District of Columbia.
NHIS asked about the prior 2 weeks; BRFSS asked about the prior month.
95% confidence intervals.
§Annual income per family (NHIS) or household (BRFSS).
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
200F); annot.EndPoint = new PointF(300F, 400F); // add annotation to The string wil be highlighted from PDF file, 0
add page numbers to a pdf document; adding page to pdf in preview
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. matchString, The string wil be deleted from PDF file, -. 0
add pages to an existing pdf; adding page numbers in pdf file
183
Patterns and Trends in Physical Activity
Table 5-5. . Percentage of adults aged 18+ years participating in regular, vigorous physical activity (3+ times
per week for 20+ minutes per occasion at 50+ percent of estimated age- and sex-specific maximum
cardiorespiratory capacity), by various demographic characteristics, National Health Interview
Survey (NHIS) and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), United States
Demographic group
1991 NHIS*
1992 BRFSS*
Overall
16.4 (15.9, 16.9)
14.4 (14.0, 14.8)
Sex
Males
18.1 (17.4, 18.8)
12.9  (12.5, , 13.3)
Females
14.9 (14.3, 15.5)
15.8 (15.4, 16.2)
Race/Ethnicity
White, non-Hispanic
17.2 (16.6, 17.7)
15.3 (14.9, 15.7)
Males
18.6 (17.9, 19.3)
13.3 (12.7, 13.9)
Females
15.9 (15.2, 16.6)
17.1 (16.5, 17.7)
Black, non-Hispanic
12.9 (11.7, 14.0)
9.4
(8.6, 10.2)
Males
16.0 (13.9, 18.0)
9.5
(8.1, 10.9)
Females
10.4
(9.0, 11.7)
9.4
(8.4, 10.4)
Hispanic
13.6 (11.9, 15.2)
11.9 (10.5, 13.3)
Males
15.6 (12.9, 18.3)
12.4 (10.2, 14.6)
Females
11.7
(9.9, 13.4)
11.4
(9.8, 13.0)
Other
16.8 (14.5, 19.1)
11.8 (10.0, 13.6)
Males
18.8 (15.2, 22.3)
11.5
(9.0, 14.0)
Females
14.8 (11.9, 17.8)
12.2 (10.0, 14.4)
Age (years)
Males
18–29
19.7 (18.3, 21.1)
8.0
(7.2, 8.8)
30–44
13.7 (12.8, 14.6)
11.1 (10.3, 11.9)
45–64
14.9 (13.7, 16.1)
16.3 (15.3, 17.3)
65–74
27.3 (25.2, 29.5)
20.6 (18.8, 22.4)
75+
38.3 (35.2, 41.5)
20.6 (18.1, 23.1)
Females
18–29
16.0 (14.7, 17.3)
11.4 (10.6, 12.2)
30–44
13.3 (12.4, 14.1)
18.0 (17.2, 18.8)
45–64
12.1 (11.1, 13.0)
17.7 (16.7, 18.7)
65–74
18.5 (16.9, 20.1)
16.5 (15.1, 17.9)
75+
22.6 (20.5, 24.7)
12.8 (11.4, 14.2)
Education
< 12 yrs
11.9 (11.1, 12.8)
8.2
(7.4, 9.0)
12 yrs
13.6 (13.0, 14.3)
11.5 (10.9, 12.1)
Some college (13–15 yrs)
18.9 (17.9, 19.9)
14.9 (14.3, 15.5)
College (16+ yrs)
23.5 (22.4, 24.6)
21.9 (21.1, 22.7)
Income§
< $10,000
15.5 (14.1, 17.0)
9.0
(8.2 , , 9.8)
$10,000–19,999
14.4 (13.5, 15.4)
10.8 (10.2, 11.4)
$20,000–34,999
15.5 (14.6, 16.4)
14.2 (13.6, 14.8)
$35,000–49,999
16.0 (14.9, 17.0)
16.3 (15.5, 17.1)
$50,000+
21.5 (20.4, 22.6)
20.5 (19.5, 21.5)
Geographic region
Northeast
16.1 (15.2, 16.9)
13.8 (13.0, 14.6)
North Central
16.5 (15.5, 17.5)
13.7 (13.1, 14.3)
South
14.7 (13.9, 15.5)
13.8 (13.2, 14.4)
West
19.2 (17.9, 20.5)
16.8 (16.0, 17.6)
Sources:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, NHIS, 1991; Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, BRFSS, 1992.
*NHIS asked about the prior 2 weeks; BRFSS asked about the prior month.
Based on data from 48 states and the District of Columbia.
95% confidence intervals.
§Annual income per family (NHIS) or household (BRFSS).
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Please note that, PDF page number starts from
add blank page to pdf preview; adding page numbers to pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. 0
add page numbers pdf file; add page numbers to a pdf file
184
Physical Activity and Health
The proportion performing regular, vigorous ac-
tivity was 3 percentage points higher among men than
women in the NHIS, but it was 3 percentage points
higher among women than men in the BRFSS. This
difference between sexes in the surveys may be related
to the BRFSS’s use of a correction procedure (based on
speeds of activities like walking, jogging, and swim-
ming) to create intensity coding (Appendix B;
Caspersen and Powell [unpublished technical mono-
graph] 1986; Caspersen and Merritt 1995). Regular,
vigorous activity tended to be more prevalent among
whites than among blacks and Hispanics (Table 5-5).
These racial and ethnic patterns were somewhat more
striking among women than among men.
The relationship between regular, vigorous physi-
cal activity and age varied somewhat between the
two surveys. In the NHIS, the prevalence of regular,
vigorous activity was higher for men and women
aged 18–29 years than for those aged 30–64 years,
but it was highest among men and women aged 65
years and older. Among men participating in the
BRFSS, regular, vigorous activity increased with age
from those 18–29 years old to those ‡ 65 years old.
Among women participating in the BRFSS, the preva-
lence of regular, vigorous activity was higher for
those aged 30–74 years than for those aged 18–29
years and ‡ 75 years.
The finding of generally lower prevalences of
regular, vigorous activity among younger than older
adults (Table 5-5) may seem unexpected. It is ex-
plained partly by both the greater leisure time of
older adults and the use of an age-related relative
intensity classification (Caspersen, Pollard, Pratt
1987; Stephens and Caspersen 1994; Caspersen and
Merritt 1995). Because cardiorespiratory capacity
declines with age, activities that would be moder-
ately intense for young adults, such as walking,
become more vigorous for older people. If the two
surveys had instead used an absolute intensity clas-
sification, the estimated prevalence of people engag-
ing in regular, vigorous physical activity would have
fallen dramatically with age. (This age-related drop
in activities of high absolute intensity is shown in
Table 5-6 and described in the next section.) Like-
wise, the male:female ratio of vigorous activity preva-
lence in Table 5-5 would rise if an absolute intensity
classification were used, because women have a
lower average cardiorespiratory capacity than men.
In both surveys, the proportion of adults report-
ing regular, vigorous activity was higher in each
successive educational category (Table 5-5). Adults
who had college degrees reported regular, vigorous
activity approximately two to three times more often
than those who had not completed high school. In
the NHIS, a similar positive association was seen
between income and regular, vigorous physical ac-
tivity. In the BRFSS, the prevalence of regular, vigor-
ous physical activity was highest at the highest
income level. The prevalence of regular, vigorous
physical activity was not consistently related to em-
ployment status or marital status in the two surveys.
It was higher in the West than in other regions of the
United States and in warmer than in colder months.
In the 1994 BRFSS, state-specific prevalences of
regular, vigorous activity ranged from 6.7 to 16.9
(Table 5-3).
Participation in Specific Physical Activities
NHIS participants reported specific activities in the
previous 2 weeks (Table 5-6). By far, walking was the
most commonly reported leisure-time physical ac-
tivity, followed by gardening or yard work, stretch-
ing exercises, bicycling, strengthening exercises, stair
climbing, jogging or running, aerobics or aerobic
dancing, and swimming. Because these percentages
are based on all participants in the year-round NHIS,
they underestimate the overall prevalence of partici-
pation in seasonal activities, such as skiing.
Substantial differences exist between the sexes
for many activities. Gardening or yard work, strength-
ening exercises, jogging or running, and vigorous or
contact sports were more commonly reported by
men than women. Women reported walking and
aerobics or aerobic dancing more often than men and
reported participation in stretching exercises, bicy-
cling, stair climbing, and swimming about as often as
men. Participation in most activities, especially weight
lifting and vigorous or contact sports, declined sub-
stantially with age (Table 5-6). The prevalence of
walking, gardening or yard work, and golf tended to
remain stable or increase with age. Among adults
aged 65 years and older, walking (> 40 percent
prevalence) and gardening or yard work (> 20 per-
cent prevalence) were by far the most popular
activities.
185
Patterns and Trends in Physical Activity
Table 5-6. . Percentage of adults aged 18+ years reporting participation in selected common physical activities in
the prior 2 weeks, by sex and age, National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), United States, 1991
Males
Females
Activity category
18–29 30–44 45–64 65–74
75+
All
18–29 30–44 4 45–64 4 65–74
75+
All
Walking for exercise
32.8
37.6
43.3
50.1
47.1
39.4
47.4
49.1
49.4
50.1
40.5
48.3
44.1
Gardening or
yard work
22.2
36.0
39.8
42.6
38.4
34.2
15.4
28.6
29.6
28.2
21.5
25.1
29.4
Stretching exercises
32.1
27.2
20.0
15.5
15.7
25.0
32.5
27.7
21.4
21.9
17.9
26.0
25.5
Weight lifting or
other exercise
to increase
muscle strength
33.6
21.2
12.2
6.4
4.7
20.0
14.5
10.6
5.1
2.8
1.1
8.8
14.1
Jogging or running
22.6
14.1
7.7
1.4
0.5
12.8
11.6
6.5
2.5
0.8
0.4
5.7
9.1
Aerobics or aerobic
dance
3.4
3.3
2.1
1.6
1.0
2.8
19.3
12.3
6.6
4.2
1.6
11.1
7.1
Riding a bicycle or
exercise bike
18.7
18.5
14.0
10.8
8.4
16.2
17.4
16.9
12.6
11.4
6.0
14.6
15.4
Stair climbing
10.5
11.4
9.6
6.0
4.0
9.9
14.6
12.8
10.3
7.3
5.6
11.6
10.8
Swimming for
exercise
10.1
7.6
5.3
3.1
1.4
6.9
8.0
7.5
4.6
4.2
1.5
6.2
6.5
Tennis
5.7
3.3
2.9
1.1
0.4
3.5
3.1
2.4
1.3
0.6
0.1
2.0
2.7
Bowling
7.0
5.2
3.0
2.8
1.6
4.7
4.8
4.2
2.8
2.5
1.1
3.6
4.1
Golf
7.9
8.6
7.9
9.7
4.9
8.2
1.4
1.7
2.2
3.3
0.7
1.8
4.9
Baseball or softball
11.0
6.9
1.8
0.4
5.8
3.2
1.7
0.3
0.2
1.4
3.5
Handball, racquet-
ball, or squash
5.2
2.8
1.5
0.3
2.7
1.0
0.4
0.4
0.1
0.5
1.6
Skiing
1.5
1.0
0.4
0.1
0.9
0.9
0.6
0.3
0.0
0.5
0.7
Cross country skiing
0.1
0.5
0.5
0.2
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.4
0.6
0.2
0.2
0.4
0.4
Water skiing
1.5
0.7
0.3
0.7
0.7
0.5
0.1
0.0
0.4
0.5
Basketball
24.2
10.5
2.4
0.1
0.1
10.5
3.1
1.7
0.4
0.2
1.5
5.8
Volleyball
6.8
3.0
1.1
0.2
0.2
3.1
4.4
1.9
0.5
0.0
0.1
1.8
2.5
Soccer
3.3
1.4
0.3
0.1
1.4
0.9
0.4
0.1
0.4
0.9
Football
7.6
1.8
0.4
0.2
2.7
0.7
0.4
0.0
0.3
1.5
Other sports
8.6
7.9
6.0
6.2
5.2
7.3
4.5
4.5
3.6
4.3
2.8
4.1
5.7
Note:  0.0 = quantity less than 0.05 but greater than zero; —  = quantity is equal to zero.
Source:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, NHIS, 1991.
All
ages
and
sexes
186
Physical Activity and Health
Healthy People 2000 objective 1.6 recommends
that at least 40 percent of people aged 6 years and
older should regularly perform physical activities
that enhance and maintain muscular strength, mus-
cular endurance, and flexibility (USDHHS 1990).
National surveys have not quantified all these activi-
ties but have inquired about specific sentinel activi-
ties, such as weight lifting and stretching. In the 1991
NHIS, 14.1 percent of adults reported “weight lifting
and other exercises to increase muscle strength” in
the previous 2 weeks (Table 5-7). Participation in
strengthening activities was more than twice as preva-
lent among men than women. Black men tended to
have the highest participation (26.2 percent) and
black women the lowest (6.9 percent). Participation
was much higher among younger than older adults,
among the more affluent than the less affluent, and
in the West than in other regions of the United States.
Of special concern, given the promising evi-
dence that strengthening exercises provide substan-
tial benefit to the elderly (see Chapter 4), is the low
prevalence of strengthening activities among those
aged 65 or older (£ 6.4 percent in men and £ 2.8
percent in women; see Table 5-7).
Adult participation in stretching activity over
the previous 2 weeks was 25.5 percent in the NHIS
(Table 5-7). Stretching participation declined with
age and tended to be associated positively with levels
of education and income and to be lower in the South
than in other regions of the United States.
Leisure-Time Physical Activity among
Adults with Disabilities
Although little information is available on physical
activity patterns among people with disabilities, one
recent analysis was based on the special NHIS Health
Promotion and Disease Prevention Supplement from
1991. Heath and colleagues (1995) compared physi-
cal activity patterns among people with disabilities
(i.e., activity limitations due to a chronic health
problem or impairment) to those among people
without disabilities. People with disabilities were
less likely to report engaging in regular moderate
physical activity (27.2 percent) than were people
without disabilities (37.4 percent). People with dis-
abilities were also less likely to report engaging in
regular vigorous physical activity (9.6 percent vs. 14.2
percent). Correspondingly, people with disabilities
were more likely to report being inactive (32 percent
vs. 27 percent).
Trends in Leisure-Time Physical Activity
Until the 20th century, people performed most
physical activity as part of their occupations or
in subsistence activities. In Western populations,
occupation-related physical demands have declined,
and the availability of leisure time has grown. It is
generally believed that over the past 30 years, as
both the popularity of sports and public awareness
of the role of physical activity in maintaining health
have increased, physical activity performed during
leisure time has increased (Stephens 1987; Jacobs
et al. 1991). Stephens concluded that the increase
was greater among women than men and among
older than younger adults and that the rate of
increase probably was more pronounced in the
1970s than between 1980 and 1985 (Stephens 1987).
However, no systematic data were collected on
physical activity among U.S. adults until the 1980s.
Even now, few national data are available on
consistently measured trends in physical activity.
The NHIS has data from 1985, 1990, and 1991, and
the BRFSS has consistent data from the same 25
states and the District of Columbia for each year
between 1986 and 1992 and for 1994. According to
the NHIS, participation in leisure-time physical ac-
tivity among adults changed very little between the
mid-1980s and the early 1990s (Table 5-8 and Figure
5-3). Similarly, in the BRFSS (Table 5-8 and Figure
5-4), little improvement was evident from 1986
through 1994.
Physical Activity among Adolescents
and Young Adults in the United States
The most recent U.S. data on the prevalence of
physical activity among young people are from the
1992 household-based NHIS-YRBS, which sampled
all young people aged 12–21 years, and the 1995
school-based YRBS, which included students in
grades 9–12. Variations in estimates between the
NHIS-YRBS and the YRBS may be due not only to the
distinct populations represented in each survey but
also to the time of year each survey was conducted,
the mode of administration, the specific wording of
187
Patterns and Trends in Physical Activity
Table 5-7. . Percentage of adults aged 18+ years reporting participation in any strengthening activities* or
stretching exercises in the prior 2 weeks, by various demographic characteristics, National Health
Interview Survey (NHIS), United States, 1991
Demographic group
Strengthening activities
Stretching exercises
Overall
14.1 (13.6, 14.6)
25.5 (24.7, 26.4)
Sex
Males
20.0 (19.2, 20.7)
25.0 (24.0, 26.1)
Females
8.8
(8.3, 9.2)
26.0 (25.1, 27.0)
Race/Ethnicity
White, non-Hispanic
13.7 (13.2, 14.2)
25.9 (24.9, 26.8)
Males
18.8 (18.0, 19.6)
24.9 (23.8, 26.0)
Females
9.0
(8.5, 9.6)
26.7 (25.7, 27.8)
Black, non-Hispanic
15.5 (14.2, 16.9)
24.2 (22.5, 26.0)
Males
26.2 (23.7, 28.7)
24.7 (22.1, 27.3)
Females
6.9
(5.8, 8.0)
23.9 (21.7, 26.0)
Hispanic
15.8 (13.9, 17.6)
22.4 (19.9, 24.9)
Males
23.4 (20.3, 26.5)
23.6 (20.4, 26.7)
Females
8.6
(7.0, 10.3)
21.3 (18.3, 24.3)
Other
14.9 (12.3, 17.5)
30.0 (26.2, 33.8)
Males
20.3 (16.0, 24.7)
31.4 (26.0, 36.8)
Females
9.2
(6.6, 11.7)
28.5 (24.3, 32.7)
Age (years)
Males
18–29
33.6 (31.7, 35.5)
32.1 (30.1, 34.2)
30–44
21.2 (20.1, 22.3)
27.2 (25.8, 28.6)
45–64
12.2 (11.1, 13.4)
20.0 (18.6, 21.5)
65–74
6.4  (5.1, , 7.7)
15.5 (13.4, 17.6)
75+
4.7
(3.1, 6.3)
15.7 (13.2, 18.3)
Females
18–29
14.5 (13.3, 15.6)
32.5 (30.7, 34.2)
30–44
10.6
(9.9, 11.4)
27.7 (26.3, 29.0)
45–64
5.1
(4.5, 5.8)
21.4 (20.1, 22.8)
65–74
2.8
(2.0, 3.7)
21.9 (20.0, 23.8)
75+
1.1
(0.7, 1.6)
17.9 (16.0, 19.9)
Education
< 12 yrs
7.4
(6.6, 8.1)
14.7 (13.5, 15.8)
12 yrs
12.3 (11.7, 13.0)
22.6 (21.7, 23.6)
Some college (13–15 yrs)
18.3 (17.3, 19.2)
31.3 (29.9, 32.7)
College (16+ yrs)
19.6 (18.6, 20.6)
35.4 (34.0, 36.9)
Income
< $10,000
12.9 (11.4, 14.4)
23.4 (21.7, 25.1)
$10,000–$19,999
10.7
(9.8, 11.6)
21.0 (19.7, 22.3)
$20,000–$34,999
14.3 (13.4, 15.1)
25.6 (24.4, 26.9)
$35,000–$49,999
15.3 (14.3, 16.3)
28.9 (27.4, 30.4)
$50,000+
19.1 (18.1, 20.2)
33.5 (32.1, 34.9)
Geographic region
Northeast
13.8 (12.9, 14.8)
24.9 (23.6, 26.2)
North Central
14.5 (13.6, 15.3)
28.5 (26.5, 30.6)
South
12.4 (11.6, 13.3)
20.8 (19.2, 22.4)
West
16.5 (15.4, 17.7)
29.9 (28.1, 31.7)
Source:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, NHIS, 1991.
*Strengthening activities include weight lifting and other exercises to increase muscle strength.
95% confidence intervals.
Annual income per family.
188
Physical Activity and Health
questions, and the age of respondents. Trends over
time can be monitored only with the YRBS, which
was conducted in 1991 and 1993 as well as in 1995.
An assessment of the test-retest reliability of the
YRBS indicated that the four physical activity items
included in the study had a kappa value (an indicator
of reliability) in the “substantial” (i.e., 61–80) or “al-
most perfect” (i.e., 81–100) range (Brener et al. 1995).
Table 5-8. . Trends in the percentage of adults aged 18+ years reporting participation in no activity; regular,
sustained activity; and regular, vigorous activity, by sex, National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), United States, from 1985–1994
1985, 1990, 1991 NHIS
1986–1994 BRFSS
*
Males
Females
Total
Males
Females
Total
No activity
1985
19.9 (18.8, 20.9)
26.3 (25.3, 27.3)
23.2 (22.3, 24.1)
1986
31.2 (30.0,32.4)
34.3 (33.3,35.3)
32.8 (32.0,33.6)
1987
29.6 (28.4,30.8)
33.9 (32.9,34.9)
31.8 (31.0,32.6)
1988
27.5 (26.5,28.5)
31.5 (30.5,32.5)
29.6 (28.8,30.4)
1989
28.8 (27.8,29.8)
33.6 (32.6,34.6)
31.3 (30.5,32.1)
1990
24.9 (23.9, 25.9)
32.4 (31.4, 33.4)
28.3 (28.0, 29.7) 28.6 (27.6,29.6)
32.3 (31.3,33.3)
30.5 (29.7, 31.3)
1991
21.4 (20.2, 22.6)
26.9 (25.8, 28.0)
24.3 (23.2, 25.3) 29.0 (28.0,30.0)
32.8 (32.0,33.6)
31.0 (30.4, 31.6)
1992
26.7 (25.9,27.5)
31.4 (30.6,32.2)
29.2 (28.6,29.8)
1993
1994
28.7 (27.9,29.5)
33.0 (32.2,33.8)
30.9(30.3,31.5)
Regular, sustained activity
1985
27.5 (26.6, 28.4)
22.5 (21.7, 23.3)
24.9 (24.2, 25.5)
1986
19.5(18.5,20.5)
18.1(17.3,18.9)
18.8(18.2,19.4)
1987
20.0(18.8,21.2)
17.6(16.8,18.4)
18.8(18.2,19.4)
1988
20.5(19.5,21.5)
19.6(18.8,20.4)
20.0(19.4,20.6)
1989
20.0(19.0,21.0)
18.0(17.2,18.8)
19.0(18.4,19.6)
1990
29.0(28.1, 29.9)
22.7(22.0, 23.4)
25.7(25.1, 26.3) 20.5(19.5,21.5)
18.5(17.7,19.3)
19.4(18.8, 20.0)
1991
26.6(25.7, 27.5)
20.7(19.9, 21.5)
23.5(22.9, 24.1) 19.5(18.7,20.3)
18.3(17.5,19.1)
18.9(18.3, 19.5)
1992
21.0(20.2,21.8)
18.4(17.8,19.0)
19.7(19.1,20.3)
1993
1994
19.3(18.5,20.1)
18.1(17.5,18.7)
18.7(18.1,19.3)
Regular, vigorous activity
1985  17.2 (16.1, 18.3)
15.1 (14.3, 15.8)
16.1 (15.3, 16.8)
1986
11.2 (10.4,12.0)
10.3 (9.7,10.9)
10.7(10.1,11.3)
1987
10.7 (9.9,11.5)
10.6(10.0,11.2)
10.7(10.1,11.3)
1988
11.1 (10.3,11.9)
12.3 (11.5,13.1)
11.7 (11.1,12.3)
1989
11.3 (10.5,12.1)
11.9 (11.3,12.5)
11.6 (11.2,12.0)
1990
18.9(18.1, 19.7)
15.9(15.3, 16.4)
17.3(16.8, 17.8) 11.0 (10.2,11.8)
12.9(12.3,13.5)
12.0 (11.6, 12.4)
1991
18.1(17.4, 18.8)
14.9(14.3, 15.5)
16.4(15.9, 16.9) 11.2 (10.6,11.8)
12.6(12.0,13.2)
11.9 (11.5, 12.3)
1992
11.8 (11.2,12.4)
12.2 (11.6,12.8)
12.0 (11.6,12.4)
1993
1994
11.4 (10.8,12.0)
11.4 (10.8,12.0)
11.4 (11.0,11.8)
Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics,  NHIS, 1985, 1990, 1991; Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, BRFSS, 1986–1992 and 1994.
*25 states and the District of Columbia
95% confidence intervals.
Physical Inactivity
Healthy People 2000 objective 1.5 calls for reducing
to no more than 15 percent the proportion of people
aged 6 years and older who are inactive (USDHHS
1990). For this report, inactivity was defined as
performing no vigorous activity (exercise or sports
participation that made the respondent “sweat or
breathe hard” for at least 20 minutes) and performing
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested