c# asp.net pdf viewer : Add blank page to pdf application SDK tool html wpf winforms online sgrfull23-part2015

Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Theories and Models Used in Behavioral and Social Science Research on Physical Activity . . . . 211
Learning Theories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Health Belief Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Transtheoretical Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Relapse Prevention Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Social Learning/Social Cognitive Theory  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Social Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Ecological Approaches  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Behavioral Research on Physical Activity among Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Factors Influencing Physical Activity among Adults  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Modifiable Determinants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Determinants for Population Subgroups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Summary  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Interventions to Promote Physical Activity among Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Individual Approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Interventions in Health Care Settings  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Community Approaches  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Worksite Programs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Communications Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
Special Population Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Racial and Ethnic Minorities  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
People Who Are Overweight  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
C
HAPTER
6
U
NDERSTANDING
AND
P
ROMOTING
P
HYSICAL
A
CTIVITY
Add blank page to pdf - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page to pdf online; add pdf pages together
Add blank page to pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
adding a page to a pdf in reader; add page number pdf file
Contents
continued
Older Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
People with Disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Summary  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Behavioral Research on Physical Activity among Children and Adolescents  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Factors Influencing Physical Activity among Children and Adolescents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Modifiable Determinants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Determinants for Population Subgroups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Summary  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Interventions to Promote Physical Activity among Children and Adolescents . . . . . . . . . . 236
School Programs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
School-Community Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Interventions in Health Care Settings  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Special Population Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Summary  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Promising Approaches, Barriers, and Resources  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Environmental and Policy Approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Community-Based Approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Societal Barriers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
Societal Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Conclusions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Research Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Determinants of Physical Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Physical Activity Interventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references: pageId, The page index of the deleted blank page.
add page number to pdf reader; add pages to pdf online
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
Add and Insert a blank Page to Word File in C#. This C# demo will help you to insert a Word page to a DOCXDocument object at specified position.
add page numbers to pdf in preview; adding page numbers to pdf in reader
C
HAPTER
6
U
NDERSTANDING
AND
P
ROMOTING
P
HYSICAL
A
CTIVITY
Introduction
A
s the benefits of moderate, regular physical
activity have become more widely recognized,
the need has increased for interventions that can
promote this healthful behavior. Because theories
and models of human behavior can guide the
development and refinement of intervention efforts,
this chapter first briefly examines elements of be-
havioral and social science theories and models that
have been used to guide much of the research on
physical activity. First for adults, then for children
and adolescents, the chapter reviews factors influ-
encing physical activity and describes interven-
tions that have sought to improve participation in
regular physical activity among these two age
groups. To put in perspective the problem of
increasing individual participation in physical
activity, the chapter next examines societal barri-
ers to engaging in physical activity and describes
existing resources that can increase opportunities
for activity. The chapter concludes with a sum-
mary of what is known about determinant and
intervention research on physical activity and makes
recommendations for research and practice.
Theories and Models Used in
Behavioral and Social Science
Research on Physical Activity
Numerous theories and models have been used in
behavioral and social science research on physical
activity. These approaches vary in their applicability
to physical activity research. Some models and theo-
ries were designed primarily as guides to under-
standing behavior, not as guides for designing
interventions. Others were specifically constructed
with a view toward developing interventions, and
some of these have been applied extensively in inter-
vention research as well. Because most were devel-
oped to explain the behavior of individuals and to
guide individual and small-group intervention pro-
grams, these models and theories may have only
limited application to understanding the behavior of
populations or designing communitywide interven-
tions. Key elements most frequently used in the
behavioral and social science research on physical
activity are described below and summarized in
Table 6-1.
Learning Theories
Learning theories emphasize that learning a new,
complex pattern of behavior, like changing from a
sedentary to an active lifestyle, normally requires
modifying many of the small behaviors that compose
an overall complex behavior (Skinner 1953). Principles
of behavior modification suggest that a complex-
pattern behavior, such as walking continuously for
30 minutes daily, can be learned by first breaking it
down into smaller segments (e.g., walking for 10
minutes daily). Behaviors that are steps toward a
final goal need to be reinforced and established first,
with rewards given for partial accomplishment if
necessary. Incremental increases, such as adding 5
minutes to the daily walking each week, are then
made as the complex pattern of behaviors is “shaped”
toward the targeted goal. A further complication to
the change process is that new patterns of physical
activity behavior must replace or compete with former
patterns of inactive behaviors that are often satisfy-
ing (e.g., watching television), habitual behaviors
(e.g., parking close to the door), or behaviors cued by
the environment (e.g., the presence of an elevator).
Reinforcement describes the consequences that
motivate individuals either to continue or discon-
tinue a behavior (Skinner 1953; Bandura 1986).
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
Add and Insert a blank Page to PowerPoint File in C#. This C# demo will help you to insert a PowerPoint page to a DOCXDocument object at specified position.
add page numbers pdf files; adding page numbers to pdf documents
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Create a new PDF Document with one Blank Page in C# Project.
adding a page to a pdf in preview; add page to pdf
212
Physical Activity and Health
Table 6-1.  Summary of theories and models used in physical activity research
Theory/model
Level
Key concepts
Classic learning theories
Individual
Reinforcement
Cues
Shaping
Health belief model
Individual
Perceived susceptibility
Perceived severity
Perceived benefits
Perceived barriers
Cues to action
Self-efficacy
Transtheoretical model
Individual
Precontemplation
Contemplation
Preparation
Action
Maintenance
Relapse prevention
Individual
Skills training
Cognitive reframing
Lifestyle rebalancing
Social cognitive theory
Interpersonal
Reciprocal determinism
Behavioral capability
Self-efficacy
Outcome expectations
Observational learning
Reinforcement
Theory of planned behavior
Interpersonal
Attitude toward the behavior
Outcome expectations
Value of outcome expectations
Subjective norm
Beliefs of others
Motive to comply with others
Perceived behavioral control
Social support
Interpersonal
Instrumental support
Informational support
Emotional support
Appraisal support
Ecological perspective
Environmental
Multiple levels of influence
Intrapersonal
Interpersonal
Institutional
Community
Public policy
Source: Adapted from Glanz K and Rimer BK. 
Theory at-a-glance: a guide for health promotion practice
, U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services, 1995.
C# PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. pageIdx, The page index of the deleted blank page. 0
adding page numbers to a pdf document; add and delete pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
with blank page? If so, you will work out this target just by using RasterEdge PDF document creating component within VB web or Windows application. Add
adding page numbers to pdf in; add page number to pdf in preview
213
Understanding and Promoting Physical Activity
Most behaviors, including physical activity, are
learned and maintained under fairly complex sched-
ules of reinforcement and anticipated future re-
wards. Future rewards or incentives may include
physical consequences (e.g., looking better), extrin-
sic rewards (e.g., receiving praise and encourage-
ment from others, receiving a T-shirt), and intrinsic
rewards (e.g., experiencing a feeling of accomplish-
ment or gratification from attaining a personal mile-
stone). It is important to note that although providing
praise, encouragement, and other extrinsic rewards
may help people adopt positive lifestyle behaviors,
such external reinforcement may not be reliable in
sustaining long-term change (Glanz and Rimer 1995).
Health Belief Model
The health belief model stipulates that a person’s
health-related behavior depends on the person’s per-
ception of four critical areas: the severity of a poten-
tial illness, the person’s susceptibility to that illness,
the benefits of taking a preventive action, and the
barriers to taking that action (Hochbaum 1958;
Rosenstock 1960, 1966). The model also incorpo-
rates cues to action (e.g., leaving a written reminder
to oneself to walk) as important elements in eliciting
or maintaining patterns of behavior (Becker 1974).
The construct of self-efficacy, or a person’s confi-
dence in his or her ability to successfully perform an
action (discussed in more detail later in this chap-
ter), has been added to the model (Rosenstock 1990),
perhaps allowing it to better account for habitual
behaviors, such as a physically active lifestyle.
Transtheoretical Model
In this model, behavior change has been conceptual-
ized as a five-stage process or continuum related to
a person’s readiness to change: precontemplation,
contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance
(Prochaska and DiClemente 1982, 1984). People are
thought to progress through these stages at varying
rates, often moving back and forth along the con-
tinuum a number of times before attaining the goal
of maintenance. Therefore, the stages of change are
better described as spiraling or cyclical rather than
linear (Prochaska, DiClemente, Norcross 1992). In
this model, people use different processes of change
as they move from one stage of change to another.
Efficient self-change thus depends on doing the right
thing (processes) at the right time (stages) (Prochaska,
DiClemente, Norcross 1992). According to this
theory, tailoring interventions to match a person’s
readiness or stage of change is essential (Marcus and
Owen 1992). For example, for people who are not
yet contemplating becoming more active, encourag-
ing a step-by-step movement along the continuum of
change may be more effective than encouraging
them to move directly into action (Marcus, Banspach,
et al. 1992).
Relapse Prevention Model
Some researchers have used concepts of relapse
prevention (Marlatt and Gordon 1985) to help new
exercisers anticipate problems with adherence. Fac-
tors that contribute to relapse include negative emo-
tional or physiologic states, limited coping skills,
social pressure, interpersonal conflict, limited social
support, low motivation, high-risk situations, and
stress (Brownell et al. 1986; Marlatt and George
1990). Principles of relapse prevention include iden-
tifying high-risk situations for relapse (e.g., change
in season) and developing appropriate solutions
(e.g., finding a place to walk inside during the
winter). Helping people distinguish between a lapse
(e.g., a few days of not participating in their planned
activity) and a relapse (e.g., an extended period of
not participating) is thought to improve adherence
(Dishman 1991; Marcus and Stanton 1993).
Theory of Reasoned Actionand
Theory of Planned Behavior
The theory of reasoned action (Fishbein and Ajzen
1975; Ajzen and Fishbein 1980) states that indi-
vidual performance of a given behavior is primarily
determined by a person’s intention to perform that
behavior. This intention is determined by two major
factors: the person’s attitude toward the behavior
(i.e., beliefs about the outcomes of the behavior and
the value of these outcomes) and the influence of the
person’s social environment or subjective norm (i.e.,
beliefs about what other people think the person
should do, as well as the person’s motivation to
comply with the opinions of others). The theory of
planned behavior (Ajzen 1985, 1988) adds to the
theory of reasoned action the concept of perceived
control over the opportunities, resources, and skills
necessary to perform a behavior. Ajzen’s concept of
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references: VB.NET: Create a New PDF Document with One Blank Page.
add a page to pdf file; add pdf pages to word
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
page. AddPage: Prior to the currently displayed PDF page to add a blank page. DeletePage: Delete the currently displayed PDF page.
add page number to pdf; add page numbers to a pdf
214
Physical Activity and Health
perceived behavioral control is similar to Bandura’s
(1977a) concept of self-efficacy—a person’s percep-
tion of his or her ability to perform the behavior
(Ajzen 1985, 1988). Perceived behavioral control
over opportunities, resources, and skills necessary to
perform a behavior is believed to be a critical aspect
of behavior change processes.
Social Learning/Social Cognitive Theory
Social learning theory (Bandura 1977b), later re-
named social cognitive theory (Bandura 1986),
proposes that behavior change is affected by environ-
mental influences, personal factors, and attributes of
the behavior itself (Bandura 1977b). Each may affect
or be affected by either of the other two. A central
tenet of social cognitive theory is the concept of self-
efficacy. A person must believe in his or her capability
to perform the behavior (i.e., the person must possess
self-efficacy) and must perceive an incentive to do so
(i.e., the person’s positive expectations from perform-
ing the behavior must outweigh the negative expecta-
tions). Additionally, a person must value the outcomes
or consequences that he or she believes will occur as
a result of performing a specific behavior or action.
Outcomes may be classified as having immediate
benefits (e.g., feeling energized following physical
activity) or long-term benefits (e.g., experiencing
improvements in cardiovascular health as a result of
physical activity). But because these expected out-
comes are filtered through a person’s expectations or
perceptions of being able to perform the behavior in
the first place, self-efficacy is believed to be the single
most important characteristic that determines a
person’s behavior change (Bandura 1986).
Self-efficacy can be increased in several ways,
among them by providing clear instructions, provid-
ing the opportunity for skill development or training,
and modeling the desired behavior. To be effective,
models must evoke trust, admiration, and respect
from the observer; models must not, however, appear
to represent a level of behavior that the observer is
unable to visualize attaining (Bandura 1986).
Social Support
Often associated with health behaviors such as
physical activity, social support is frequently used
in behavioral and social research. There is, how-
ever, considerable variation in how social support
is conceptualized and measured (Israel and Schurman
1990). Social support for physical activity can be
instrumental, as in giving a nondriver a ride to an
exercise class; informational, as in telling someone
about a walking program in the neighborhood; emo-
tional, as in calling to see how someone is faring with
a new walking program; or appraising, as in provid-
ing feedback and reinforcement in learning a new
skill (Israel and Schurman 1990). Sources of support
for physical activity include family members, friends,
neighbors, co-workers, and exercise program lead-
ers and participants.
Ecological Approaches
A criticism of most theories and models of behavior
change is that they emphasize individual behavior
change processes and pay little attention to sociocul-
tural and physical environmental influences on be-
havior (McLeroy et al. 1988). Recently, interest has
developed in ecological approaches to increasing
participation in physical activity (McLeroy et al.
1988; CDC 1988; Stokols 1992). These approaches
place the creation of supportive environments on a
par with the development of personal skills and the
reorientation of health services. Stokols (1992) and
Simons-Morton and colleagues (CDC 1988; Simons-
Morton, Simons-Morton, et al. 1988) have illus-
trated this concept of a health-promoting environment
by describing how physical activity could be pro-
moted by establishing environmental supports, such
as bike paths, parks, and incentives to encourage
walking or bicycling to work.
An underlying theme of ecological perspectives
is that the most effective interventions occur on
multiple levels. McLeroy and colleagues (1988), for
example, have proposed a model that encompasses
several levels of influences on health behaviors:
intrapersonal factors, interpersonal and group fac-
tors, institutional factors, community factors, and
public policy. Similarly,  a model advanced by Simons-
Morton and colleagues (CDC 1988) has three levels
(individual, organizational, and governmental) in
four settings (schools, worksites, health care institu-
tions, and communities). Interventions that simulta-
neously influence these multiple levels and multiple
settings may be expected to lead to greater and
longer-lasting changes and maintenance of existing
health-promoting habits. This is a promising area for
215
Understanding and Promoting Physical Activity
the design of future intervention research to pro-
mote physical activity.
Summary
Some similarities can be noted among the behavioral
and social science theories and models used to un-
derstand and enhance health behaviors such as physi-
cal activity. Many of the theoretical approaches
highlight the role of the perceived outcomes of
behavior, although different terms are used for this
construct, including perceived benefits and barriers
(health belief model) and outcome expectations (so-
cial cognitive theory and theory of planned behav-
ior) (Table 6-1). Several approaches also emphasize
the influence of perceptions of control over behav-
ior; this influence is given labels such as self-efficacy
(health belief model, social cognitive theory) and
perceived behavioral control (theory of planned be-
havior). Other theories and models feature the role
of social influences, as in the concepts of observa-
tional learning (social cognitive theory), perceived
norm (theory of reasoned action and theory of planned
behavior), social support, and interpersonal influ-
ences (ecological perspective). Most of the theories
and models, however, do not address the influence of
the environment on health behavior.
Behavioral Research on Physical
Activity among Adults
Behavioral research in this area includes studies on
both the factors influencing physical activity among
adults (determinants research) and the effectiveness
of strategies and programs to increase this behavior
(interventions research). Although many of the key
concepts presented in the preceding section are
featured in both types of research presented here,
neither area is limited to those concepts only.
Factors Influencing Physical Activity
among Adults
Research on the determinants of physical activity
identifies those factors associated with, or predictive
of, this behavior. This section reviews determinants
studies in which the measured outcome was overall
physical activity, adherence to or continued partici-
pation in structured physical activity programs, or
movement from one stage of change to another (e.g.,
from contemplation to preparation). The section
does not review studies in which the outcome mea-
sured was an intermediate measure of physical activ-
ity (e.g., intentions concerning future participation
in physical activity). Although researchers have stud-
ied a wide array of potential influences on physical
activity among adults, the section focuses on factors
that can be modified, such as self-efficacy and social
support, rather than on factors that cannot be
changed, such as age, sex, and race/ethnicity.
Modifiable Determinants
The modifiable determinants of adult physical activ-
ity include personal, interpersonal, and environ-
mental factors (Table 6-1). Self-efficacy, a construct
from social cognitive theory, has been consistently
and positively associated with adult physical activity
(Courneya and McAuley 1994; Desmond et al. 1993;
Hofstetter et al. 1991; Yordy and Lent 1993), physi-
cal activity stage of change (Marcus, Eaton, et al.
1994; Marcus and Owen 1992; Marcus, Pinto, et al.
1994; Marcus, Selby, et al. 1992), and adherence to
structured physical activity programs (DuCharme
and Brawley 1995; Duncan and McAuley 1993;
McAuley, Lox, Duncan 1993; Poag-DuCharme and
Brawley 1993; Robertson and Keller 1992). The
evidence is less conclusive, however, for the theory
of planned behavior’s construct of perceived behav-
ioral control (Courneya 1995; Courneya and McAuley
1995; Godin et al. 1991, 1995;  Godin, Valois, Lepage
1993; Kimiecik 1992; Yordy and Lent 1993).
Several studies have found no association be-
tween adult physical activity (whether physical ac-
tivity, stage of change, or adherence) and either the
health belief model’s constructs of perceived benefits
(Hofstetter et al. 1991; Mirotznik, Feldman, Stein
1995; Oldridge and Streiner 1990; Taggart and
Connor 1995) and perceived barriers (Desmond et
al. 1993; Godin et al. 1995; Neuberger et al. 1994;
Oldridge and Streiner 1990; Taggart and Connor
1995) or the theory of reasoned action and theory of
planned behavior’s construct of attitude toward the
behavior (Courneya and McAuley 1995; Godin,
Valois, Lepage 1993; Hawkes and Holm 1993). None-
theless, the cumulative body of evidence supports
the conclusion that expectations of both positive
(e.g., benefits) and negative (e.g., barriers) behav-
ioral outcomes are associated with physical activity
among adults. Expectation of positive outcomes or
216
Physical Activity and Health
perceived benefits of physical activity has been con-
sistently and positively associated with adult physical
activity (Ali and Twibell 1995; Neuberger et al. 1994),
physical activity stage of change (Booth et al. 1993;
Calfas et al. 1994; Eaton et al. 1993; Marcus, Eaton, et
al. 1994; Marcus and Owen 1992; Marcus, Pinto, et al.
1994; Marcus, Rakowski, Rossi 1992), and adherence
to structured physical activity programs (Lynch et al.
1992; Robertson and Keller 1992). Conversely, the
construct of perceived barriers to physical activity has
been negatively associated with adult physical activity
(Ali and Twibell 1995; Dishman and Steinhardt 1990;
Godin et al. 1991; Hofstetter et al. 1991; Horne 1994),
physical activity stage of change (Calfas et al. 1994;
Lee 1993; Marcus, Eaton, et al. 1994; Marcus and
Owen 1992; Marcus, Pinto, et al. 1994; Marcus,
Rakowski, Rossi 1992), and adherence to structured
physical activity programs (Howze, Smith, DiGilio
1989; Mirotznik et al. 1995; Robertson and Keller
1992). Additionally, attitude toward the behavior
(outcome expectations and their values) has been
consistently and positively related to physical activity
(Courneya and McAuley 1994; Dishman and
Steinhardt 1990; Godin et al. 1987, 1991; Kimiecik
1992; Yordy and Lent 1993) and stage of change
(Courneya 1995).
Social support from family and friends has been
consistently and positively related to adult physical
activity (Felton and Parsons 1994; Horne 1994; Minor
and Brown 1993; Sallis, Hovell, Hofstetter 1992; Treiber
et al. 1991), stage of change (Lee 1993), and adher-
ence to structured exercise programs (Duncan and
McAuley 1993; Elward, Larson, Wagner 1992). Be-
havioral intention, a construct from the theory of
reasoned action and the theory of planned behavior,
also has consistently been associated with adult physi-
cal activity (Courneya and McAuley 1994; Godin et al.
1987, 1991; Godin, Valois, Lepage 1993; Kimiecik
1992; Yordy and Lent 1993), stage of change (Courneya
1995), and adherence to structured exercise programs
(Courneya and McAuley 1995; DuCharme and Brawley
1995). Conversely, the construct of subjective norm
from these theories has been both positively associ-
ated (Courneya 1995; Godin et al. 1987, 1991; Hawkes
and Holm 1993; Kimiecik 1992; Yordy and Lent
1993) and not associated (Courneya and McAuley
1995; Godin et al. 1995; Hofstetter et al. 1991) with
adult physical activity, stage of change, and adherence
to structured exercise programs.
There is also mixed evidence regarding the posi-
tive relationship between the health belief model’s
construct of perceived severity of diseases and either
physical activity (Godin et al. 1991) or adherence to
structured exercise programs (Lynch et al. 1992;
Mirotznik, Feldman, Stein 1995; Oldridge and
Streiner 1990; Robertson and Keller 1992). Addi-
tionally, that model’s construct of perceived suscep-
tibility to illness has been unrelated to adult adherence
to structured exercise programs (Lynch et al. 1992;
Mirotznik et al. 1995; Oldridge and Streiner 1990).
The cumulative body of determinants research
consistently reveals that exercise enjoyment is a
determinant that has been positively associated with
adult physical activity (Courneya and McAuley 1994;
Horne 1994; McAuley 1991), stage of change (Calfas
et al. 1994), and adherence to structured exercise
programs (Wilson et al. 1994). Conversely, there has
been no relationship between locus of control beliefs
(i.e., perceptions of personal control over health,
fitness, or physical activity) and either adult physical
activity (Ali and Twibell 1995; Burk and Kimiecik
1994; Dishman and Steinhardt 1990; Duffy and
MacDonald 1990) or adherence to structured exer-
cise programs (Lynch et al. 1992; Oldridge and
Streiner 1990). Although previous physical activity
during adulthood has been consistently related to
physical activity among adults (Godin et al. 1987,
1993; Minor and Brown 1993; Sharpe and Connell
1992) and stage of change (Eaton et al. 1993), history
of physical activity during youth has been unrelated
to adult physical activity (Powell and Dysinger 1987;
Sallis, Hovell, Hofstetter 1992).
Determinants for Population Subgroups
Few determinants studies of heterogeneous samples
have examined similar sets of characteristics in sub-
groups. Self-efficacy is the variable with the stron-
gest and most consistent association with physical
activity in different subgroups from the same large
study sample. Self-efficacy has been positively re-
lated to physical activity among men, women, younger
adults, older adults (Sallis et al. 1989), Latinos (Hovell
et al. 1991), overweight persons (Hovell et al. 1990),
and persons with injuries or disabilities (Hofstetter
et al. 1991). The generalizability of the self-efficacy
associations is extended by studies of university
students and alumni (Calfas et al. 1994; Courneya
and McAuley 1994; Yordy and Lent 1993), employed
217
Understanding and Promoting Physical Activity
women (Marcus, Pinto, et al. 1994), participants in
structured exercise programs (Duncan and McAuley
1993; McAuley, Lox, Duncan 1993; Poag-DuCharme
and Brawley 1993), and people with coronary heart
disease (CHD) (Robertson and Keller 1992).
Summary
Ideally, theories and models of behavioral and social
science could be used to guide research concerning
the factors that influence adult physical activity. In
actuality, the application of these approaches to deter-
minants research in physical activity has generally
been limited to individual and interpersonal theories
and models. Social support and some factors from
social cognitive theory, such as confidence in one’s
ability to engage in physical activity (i.e., self-efficacy)
and beliefs about the outcome of physical activity,
have been consistently related to physical activity
among adults. Factors from other theories and mod-
els, however, have received mixed support. Although
perceptions of the benefits of, and barriers to, physical
activity have been consistently related to physical
activity among adults, other constructs from the health
belief model, such as perceptions of susceptibility to,
and the severity of, disease, have not been related to
adult physical activity. Further, constructs from the
theory of reasoned action and the theory of planned
behavior, including intentions and beliefs about the
outcomes of behavior, have been consistently related
to adult physical activity, whereas there has been
equivocal evidence of this relationship for normative
beliefs and perceptions of the difficulty of engaging in
the behavior. Exercise enjoyment, a determinant that
does not derive directly from any of the behavioral
theories and models, has been consistently associated
with adult physical activity.
Few studies have specifically contrasted physi-
cal activity determinants among different sex, age,
racial/ethnic, geographic location, or health status
subgroups. Many studies contain relatively homoge-
neous samples of groups, such as young adults,
elderly persons, white adults, participants in weight
loss groups, members of health clubs, persons with
heart disease, and persons with arthritis. Because the
numbers of participants in the studies that include
these subgroups are small, and because the studies
evaluated different factors, making comparisons be-
tween studies is problematic.
Interventions to Promote
Physical Activity among Adults
This section reviews intervention studies in which
the measured outcome was physical activity, adher-
ence to physical activity, or movement in stage of
change (Table 6-2). It does not include intervention
studies designed to assess the effect of physical
activity on health outcomes or risk factors (see
Chapter 4). Further, this review places special em-
phasis on experimental and quasi-experimental stud-
ies, which are better able to control the influence of
other factors and thus to determine if the outcomes
were due to the intervention itself (Weiss 1972).
Individual Approaches
Individual behavioral management approaches, in-
cluding those derived from learning theories, relapse
prevention, stages of change, and social learning
theory, have been used with mixed success in nu-
merous intervention studies designed to increase
physical activity (Table 6-2). Behavioral manage-
ment approaches that have been applied include self-
monitoring, feedback, reinforcement, contracting,
incentives and contests, goal setting, skills training
to prevent relapse, behavioral counseling, and
prompts or reminders. Applications have been car-
ried out in person, by mail, one-on-one, and in group
settings. Typically, researchers have employed these
in combination with other behavioral management
approaches or with those derived from other theo-
ries, such as social support, making it more difficult
to ascertain their specific effects. In numerous in-
stances, physical activity was only one of several
behaviors addressed in an intervention, which also
makes it difficult to determine the extent that physi-
cal activity was emphasized as an intervention com-
ponent relative to other components.
Self-monitoring of physical activity behavior has
been one of the most frequently employed behavioral
management techniques. Typically, it has involved
individuals keeping written records of their physical
activity, such as number of episodes per week, time
spent per episode, and feelings during exercising. In
one study, women who joined a health club were
randomly assigned to a control condition or one of
two intervention conditions—self-monitoring of at-
tendance or self-monitoring plus extra staff attention
(Weber and Wertheim 1989). Overall, women in the
218
Physical Activity and Health
Table 6-2.  Studies of interventions to increase physical activity among adults
Study
Design
Theoretical approach
Population
Individual approaches
Weber and Wertheim
3 month
Self-monitoring
55 women who joined a
(1989)
experimental
gym; mean age = 27
King, Haskell, et al.
2 year
Behavioral management
269 white adults
(1995)
experimental
aged 50–65 years    
Lombard, Lombard,
24 week
Stages of change
155 university faculty and
Winett (1995)
experimental
staff; mostly women
Cardinal and Sachs
12 week
Stages of change
113 clerical staff at a
(1995)
experimental
university; mean age = 37;
63% black
Belisle (1987)
10 week
Relapse prevention
350 people enrolled in
quasi-experimental
beginning exercise groups
with 3-month follow-up
Gossard et al. (1986)
12 week
Behavioral management
64 overweight healthy
experimental
men aged 40–60 years
King, Carl, et al. (1988)
16 week
Behavioral management
38 blue-collar university
pretest-posttest
employees; mean age = 45
King and Frederiksen
3 month
Relapse prevention,
58 college women
(1984)
experimental
social support,
aged 18–20 years
behavioral management
King, Taylor, et al.
Study 1: 6 month
Relapse prevention,
152 Lockheed employees
(1988)
experimental
behavioral management
aged 42–55 years
Study 2: 6 month
Behavioral management
Lockheed employees from
experimental
Study 1
I = intervention; C = control or comparison group.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested