c# asp.net pdf viewer : Add page to pdf application SDK tool html .net wpf online sgrfull4-part2023

19
Historical Background, Terminology, Evolution of Recommendations, and Measurement
of physiology at the University of London, F.A.
Bainbridge, published a second edition of Physiology
of Muscular Exercise (Park 1981).
In 1923, the year Archibald Hill was appointed
Joddrell Professor of Physiology at University Col-
lege, London, the physiology of exercise acquired
one of its most respected researchers and staunchest
supporters, for Hill had won the Nobel Prize in
Medicine and Physiology the year before. Hill’s 1925
presidential address on “The Physiological Basis of
Athletic Records” to the British Association for the
Advancement of Science appeared in The Lancet
(1925a) and Scientific Monthly (1925b), and in 1926
he published his landmark book Muscular Activity.
The following year, Hill published Living Machinery,
which was based largely on his lectures before audi-
ences at the Lowell Institute in Boston and the Baker
Laboratory of Chemistry in Ithaca, New York.
Several leading physiologists besides Hill were
interested in the human body’s response to exercise
and environmental stressors, especially activities
involving endurance, strength, altitude, heat, and
cold. Consequently, they studied soldiers, athletes,
aviators, and mountain climbers as the best models
for acquiring data. In the United States, such re-
search was centered in the Boston area, first at the
Carnegie Nutrition Laboratory in the 1910s and
later at the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory, which was
established under the leadership of Lawrence
Henderson in 1927 (Chapman and Mitchell 1965;
Dill 1967; Horvath and Horvath 1973). That year,
Henderson and colleagues first demonstrated that
endurance exercise training improved the efficiency
of the cardiovascular system by increasing stroke
volume and decreasing heart rate at rest. Two years
later, Schneider and Ring (1929) published the
results of a 12-week endurance training program on
one person, demonstrating a 24-percent increase in
“crest load of oxygen” (maximal oxygen uptake).
Over the next 15 years, a limited number of exercise
training studies were published that evaluated the
response of maximal oxygen uptake or endurance
performance capacity to exercise training. These
included noteworthy reports by Gemmill and col-
leagues (1931), Robinson and Harmon (1941), and
Knehr, Dill, and Neufeld (1942) on endurance
training responses by male college students. How-
ever, none of those early studies compared the
effects of different types, intensities, durations, or
frequencies of exercise on performance capacity or
health-related outcomes.
Activities surrounding World War II greatly in-
fluenced the research in exercise physiology, and
several laboratories, including the Harvard Fatigue
Laboratory, began directing their efforts toward top-
ics of importance to the military. The other national
concern that created much interest among physiolo-
gists was the fear (discussed earlier in this chapter),
that American children were less fit than their Euro-
pean counterparts. Research was directed toward the
concept of fitness in growth and development, ways
to measure fitness, and the various components of
fitness (Berryman 1995). Major advances were also
made in the 1940s and 1950s in developing the
components of physical fitness (Cureton 1947) and
in determining the effects of endurance and strength
training on measures of performance and physi-
ologic function, especially adaptations of the cardio-
vascular and metabolic systems. Also investigated
were the effects of exercise training on health-related
outcomes, such as cholesterol metabolism (Taylor,
Anderson, Keys 1957; Montoye et al. 1959).
Starting in the late 1950s and continuing through
the 1970s, a rapidly increasing number of published
studies evaluated or compared different components
of endurance-oriented exercise training regimens.
For example, Reindell, Roskamm, and Gerschler
(1962) in Germany, Christensen (1960) in Denmark,
and Yakovlev and colleagues (1961) in Russia
compared—and disagreed—about the relative ben-
efits of interval versus continuous exercise train-
ing in increasing cardiac stroke volume and
endurance capacity. Other investigators began to
evaluate the effects of different modes (Sloan and
Keen 1959) and durations (Sinasalo and Juurtola
1957) of endurance-type training on physiologic
and performance measures.
Karvonen and colleagues’ (1957) landmark paper
that introduced using “percent maximal heart rate
reserve” to calculate or express exercise training in-
tensity was one of the first studies designed to com-
pare the effects of two different exercise intensities on
cardiorespiratory responses during exercise. Over the
next 20 years, numerous investigators documented
the effects of different exercise training regimens on a
variety of health-related outcomes among healthy
Add page to pdf - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page to pdf reader; add page number to pdf preview
Add page to pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add blank page to pdf preview; add page numbers to pdf in preview
20
Physical Activity and Health
men and women and among persons under medical
care (Bouchard, Shephard, Stephens 1994). Many of
these studies evaluated the effects of endurance or
aerobic exercise training on cardiorespiratory capac-
ity and were initially summarized by Pollock (1973).
The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
(1975, 1978) and the American Heart Association
(AHA) (1975) further refined the results of this re-
search (see the section on “Evolution of Physical
Activity Recommendations,” later in this chapter).
Over the past two decades, experts from numer-
ous disciplines have determined that exercise training
substantially enhances physical performance and have
begun to establish the characteristics of the exercise
required to produce specific health benefits (Bouchard,
Shephard, Stephens 1994). Also, behavioral scientists
have begun to evaluate what determines physical
activity habits among different segments of the popu-
lation and are developing strategies to increase physi-
cal activity among sedentary persons (Dishman 1988).
The results of much of this research are cited in the
other chapters of this report and were the focus of the
various conferences, reports, and guidelines summa-
rized later in this chapter.
As the literature of exercise science has matured
and recommendations have evolved, certain widely
agreed-on terms have emerged. Because a number of
these occur throughout the rest of this chapter and
report, they are presented and briefly defined in the
following section.
Terminology of Physical Activity,
Physical Fitness, and Health
This section discusses four broad terms used frequently
in this report: physical activity, exercise (or exercise
training), physical fitness, and health. Also included is
a glossary (Table 2-1) of more specific terms and
concepts crucial to understanding the material pre-
sented in later parts of this chapter and report.
Physical activity. Physical activity is defined as
bodily movement produced by the contraction of
skeletal muscle that increases energy expenditure
above the basal level. Physical activity can be cat-
egorized in various ways, including type, intensity,
and purpose.
Because muscle contraction has both mechani-
cal and metabolic properties, it can be classified by
either property. This situation has caused some
confusion. Typically, mechanical classification
stresses whether the muscle contraction produces
movement of the limb: isometric (same length) or
static exercise if there is no movement of the limb, or
isotonic (same tension) or dynamic exercise if there
is movement of the limb. Metabolic classification
involves the availability of oxygen for the contrac-
tion process and includes aerobic (oxygen available)
or anaerobic (oxygen unavailable) processes.
Whether an activity is aerobic or anaerobic depends
primarily on its intensity. Most activities involve
both static and dynamic contractions and aerobic
and anaerobic metabolism. Thus, activities tend to
be classified according to their dominant features.
The physical activity of a person or group is
frequently categorized by the context in which it
occurs. Common categories include occupational,
household, leisure time, or transportation. Leisure-
time activity can be further subdivided into catego-
ries such as competitive sports, recreational activities
(e.g., hiking, cycling), and exercise training.
Exercise (or exercise training). Exercise and
physical activity have been used synonymously in
the past, but more recently, exercise has been used to
denote a subcategory of physical activity: “physical
activity that is planned, structured, repetitive, and
purposive in the sense that improvement or mainte-
nance of one or more components of physical fitness
is the objective” (Caspersen, Powell, Christensen
1985). Exercise training also has denoted physical
activity performed for the sole purpose of enhancing
physical fitness.
Physical fitness. Physical fitness has been de-
fined in many ways (Park 1989). A generally ac-
cepted approach is to define physical fitness as the
ability to carry out daily tasks with vigor and alert-
ness, without undue fatigue, and with ample energy
to enjoy leisure-time pursuits and to meet unfore-
seen emergencies. Physical fitness thus includes car-
diorespiratory endurance, skeletal muscular
endurance, skeletal muscular strength, skeletal mus-
cular power, speed, flexibility, agility, balance, reac-
tion time, and body composition. Because these
attributes differ in their importance to athletic
performance versus health, a distinction has been
made between performance-related fitness and
health-related fitness (Pate 1983; Caspersen, Powell,
Christensen 1985). Health-related fitness has been
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
adding page numbers to pdf document; add page numbers pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Have a try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file. ' Open a document.
add page numbers to pdf; add document to pdf pages
21
Historical Background, Terminology, Evolution of Recommendations, and Measurement
Table 2-1. . Glossary of terms
*From Wilmore JH, Costill DL. 
Physiology of sport and exercise
. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 1994.
† From Corbin CB, Lindsey R. 
Concepts in physical education with laboratories
. 8th ed. Dubuque, IA:  Times Mirror Higher Education Group, 1994.
Adapted from Corbin CB, Lindsey R, 1994, and Wilmore JH, Costill DL, 1994.
Aerobic training—Training that improves the efficiency of the
aerobic energy-producing systems and that can improve
cardiorespiratory endurance.*
Agility—A skill-related component of physical fitness that relates
to the ability to rapidly change the position of the entire body in
space with speed and accuracy.
Anaerobic training—Training that improves the efficiency of the
anaerobic energy-producing systems and that can increase
muscular strength and tolerance for acid-base imbalances during
high-intensity effort.*
Balance—A skill-related component of physical fitness that
relates to the maintenance of equilibrium while stationary or
moving.
Body composition—A health-related component of physical
fitness that relates to the relative amounts of muscle, fat, bone,
and other vital parts of the body.
Calorimetry—Methods used to calculate the rate and quantity
of energy expenditure when the body is at rest and during
exercise.*
Direct calorimetry—A method that gauges the body’s rate
and quantity of energy production by direct measurement of
the body’s heat production; the method uses a calorimeter,
which is a chamber that measures the heat expended by the
body.*
Indirect calorimetry—A method of estimating energy
expenditure by measuring respiratory gases. Given that the
amount of O
2
and CO
2
exchanged in the lungs normally
equals that used and released by body tissues, caloric
expenditure can be measured by CO
2
production and O
2
consumption.*
Cardiorespiratory endurance (cardiorespiratory fitness)—A
health-related component of physical fitness that relates to the
ability of the circulatory and respiratory systems to supply oxygen
during sustained physical activity.
Coordination—A skill-related component of physical fitness that
relates to the ability to use the senses, such as sight and hearing,
together with body parts in performing motor tasks smoothly
and accurately.
Detraining—Changes the body undergoes in response to a
reduction or cessation of regular physical training.*
Endurance training/endurance activities—Repetitive, aerobic
use of large muscles (e.g., walking, bicycling, swimming).
Exercise (exercise training)—Planned, structured, and repetitive
bodily movement done to improve or maintain one or more
components of physical fitness.
Flexibility—A health-related component of physical fitness that
relates to the range of motion available at a joint.*
Kilocalorie (kcal)—A measurement of energy.  1 kilocalorie = 1
Calorie = 4,184 joules = 4.184 kilojoules.
Kilojoule (kjoule)—A measurement of energy. 4.184 kilojoules=
4,184 joules = 1 Calorie = 1 kilocalorie.
Maximal heart rate reserve—The difference between maximum
heart rate and resting heart rate.*
Maximal oxygen uptake (
˙
VO
2 
max )—The maximal capacity
for oxygen consumption by the body during maximal exertion.
It is also known as aerobic power, maximal oxygen consumption,
and cardiorespiratory endurance capacity.*
Maximal heart rate (HR max)—The highest heart rate value
attainable during an all-out effort to the point of exhaustion.*
Metabolic equivalent (MET)—A unit used to estimate the
metabolic cost (oxygen consumption) of physical activity.  One
MET equals the resting metabolic rate of approximately 3.5 ml
O
2
kg-1
min-1.*
Muscle fiber—An individual muscle cell.*
Muscular endurance—The ability of the muscle to continue to
perform without fatigue.*
Overtraining—The attempt to do more work than can be
physically tolerated.*
Physical activity—Bodily movement that is produced by the
contraction of skeletal muscle and that substantially increases
energy expenditure.
Physical fitness—A set of attributes that people have or achieve
that relates to the ability to perform physical activity.
Power—A skill-related component of physical fitness that relates
to the rate at which one can perform work.
Relative perceived exertion (RPE)—A person’s subjective
assessment of how hard he or she is working. The Borg scale is a
numerical scale for rating perceived exertion.*
Reaction time—A skill-related component of physical fitness that
relates to the time elapsed between stimulation and the beginning
of the reaction to it.
Resistance training—Training designed to increase strength,
power, and muscle endurance.*
Resting heart rate—The heart rate at rest, averaging 60 to 80
beats per minute.*
Retraining—Recovery of conditioning after a period of inactivity.*
Speed—A skill-related component of physical fitness that relates
to the ability to perform a movement within a short period of
time.
Strength—The ability of the muscle to exert force.*
Training heart rate (THR)—A heart rate goal established by using
the heart rate equivalent to a selected training level (percentage
of 
˙
VO
max ).  For example, if a training level of 75 percent 
˙
VO
2
max is desired, the
˙
VO
at 75 percent is determined and the heart
rate corresponding to this
VO
2
is selected as the THR.*
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image
add blank page to pdf; add page to pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via password by using simple VB.NET demo code. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF.
add and remove pages from a pdf; add page numbers pdf files
22
Physical Activity and Health
said to include cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular
strength and endurance, body composition, and flex-
ibility. The relative importance of any one attribute
depends on the particular performance or health goal.
Health. The 1988 International Consensus Con-
ference on Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, and
Health (Bouchard et al. 1990) defined health as “a
human condition with physical, social, and psycho-
logical dimensions, each characterized on a con-
tinuum with positive and negative poles. Positive
health is associated with a capacity to enjoy life and
to withstand challenges; it is not merely the absence
of disease. Negative health is associated with mor-
bidity and, in the extreme, with premature mortal-
ity.” Thus, when considering the role of physical
activity in promoting health, one must acknowledge
the importance of psychological well-being, as well
as physical health.
Evolution of Physical Activity
Recommendations
In the middle of the 20th century, recommendations
for physical activity to achieve fitness and health
benefits were based on systematic comparisons of
effects from different profiles of exercise training
(Cureton 1947; Karvonen, Kentala, Mustala 1957;
Christensen 1960; Yakolav et al. 1961; Reindell,
Roskamm, Gerschler 1962). In the 1960s and 1970s,
expert panels and committees, operating under the
auspices of health- or fitness-oriented organizations,
began to recommend specific physical activity pro-
grams or exercise prescriptions for improving physi-
cal performance capacity or health (President’s
Council on Physical Fitness 1965; AHA 1972, 1975;
ACSM 1975). These recommendations were based
on substantial clinical experience and on scientific
data available at that time.
Pollock’s 1973 review of what type of exercise
was needed to improve aerobic power and body
composition subsequently formed the basis for a
1978 position statement by the ACSM titled “The
Recommended Quantity and Quality of Exercise for
Developing and Maintaining Fitness in Healthy
Adults.” This statement outlined the exercise that
healthy adults would need to develop and maintain
cardiorespiratory fitness and healthy body composi-
tion. These guidelines recommended a frequency of
exercise training of 3–5 days per week, an intensity
of training of 60–90 percent of maximal heart rate
(equivalent to 50–85 percent of maximal oxygen
uptake or heart rate reserve), a duration of 15–60
minutes per training session, and the rhythmical and
aerobic use of large muscle groups through such
activities as running or jogging, walking or hiking,
swimming, skating, bicycling, rowing, cross-country
skiing, rope skipping, and various endurance games
or sports (Table 2-2).
Between 1978 and 1990, most exercise recom-
mendations made to the general public were based
on this 1978 position statement, even though it
addressed only cardiorespiratory fitness and body
composition. By providing clear recommendations,
these guidelines proved invaluable for promoting
cardiorespiratory endurance, although many people
overinterpreted them as guidelines for promoting
overall health. Over time, interest developed in po-
tential health benefits of more moderate forms of
physical activity, and attention began to shift to
alternative physical activity regimens (Haskell 1984;
Blair, Kohl, Gordon 1992; Blair 1993).
In 1990, the ACSM updated its 1978 position
statement by adding the development of muscular
strength and endurance as a major objective (ACSM
1990). The recommended frequency, intensity, and
mode of exercise remained similar, but the duration
was slightly increased from 15–60 minutes to 20–60
minutes per session, and moderate-intensity resis-
tance training (one set of 8–12 repetitions of 8–10
different exercises at least 2 times per week) was
suggested to develop and maintain muscular strength
and endurance (Table 2-2). These 1990 recommen-
dations also recognized that activities of moderate
intensity may have health benefits independent of
cardiorespiratory fitness:
Since the original position statement was pub-
lished in 1978, an important distinction has
been made between physical activity as it
relates to health versus fitness. It has been
pointed out that the quantity and quality of
exercise needed to obtain health-related ben-
efits may differ from what is recommended
for fitness benefits. It is now clear that lower
levels of physical activity than recommended
by this position statement may reduce the
risk for certain chronic degenerative diseases
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings. On this page, we will talk about how to achieve this via Add necessary references
add pages to pdf preview; add contents page to pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add page break to pdf; add page number to pdf reader
23
Historical Background, Terminology, Evolution of Recommendations, and Measurement
and yet may not be of sufficient quantity or
quality to improve [maximal oxygen uptake].
ACSM recognizes the potential health benefits
of regular exercise performed more frequently
and for longer duration, but at lower intensi-
ties than prescribed in this position statement.
In conjunction with a program to certify exercise
professionals at various levels of experience and
competence, the ACSM has published five editions
of Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription
(ACSM 1975, 1980, 1986, 1991, 1995b) that de-
scribe the components of the exercise prescription
and explain how to initiate and complete a proper
exercise training program (Table 2-2). The ACSM
has also published recommendations on the role
of exercise for preventing and managing hyper-
tension (1993) and for patients with coronary
heart disease (1994) and has published a position
stand on osteoporosis (1995a). For the most
part, newer recommendations that focus on spe-
cific health outcomes are consistent with the
ACSM’s 1978 and 1990 position statements, but
they generally expand the range of recommended
activities to include moderate-intensity exercise.
Between the 1960s and 1990s, other U.S. health
and fitness organizations published recommenda-
tions for physical activity. Because these organiza-
tions used the same scientific data as the ACSM, their
position statements and guidelines are similar. A
notable example is Healthy People 2000 (USDHHS
1990), the landmark publication of the U.S. Public
Health Service that lists various health objectives for
the nation. (The objectives for physical activity and
fitness, as revised in 1995 [USDHHS 1995], are
included as Appendix A of this chapter.) Other
recommendations include specific exercise programs
developed for men and women by the President’s
Council on Physical Fitness (1965) and the YMCA
(National Council YMCA 1989). The AHA (1972,
1975, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995) has published for
both health professionals and the public a series of
physical activity recommendations and position state-
ments directed at CHD prevention and cardiac reha-
bilitation. In 1992, the AHA published a statement
identifying physical inactivity as a fourth major risk
factor for CHD, along with smoking, high blood
pressure, and high blood cholesterol (Fletcher et al.
1992). The American Association of Cardiovascular
and Pulmonary Rehabilitation has also published
guidelines for using physical activity for cardiac
(1991, 1995) and pulmonary (1993) rehabilitation.
Some of these recommendations provide substantial
advice to ensure that exercise programs are safe for
people at increased risk for heart disease or for
patients with established disease.
Between the 1970s and the mid-1990s, exercise
training studies conducted on middle-aged and older
persons and on patients with lower functional capac-
ity demonstrated that significant cardiorespiratory
performance and health-related benefits can be ob-
tained at more moderate levels of activity intensity
than previously realized. In addition, population-
based epidemiologic studies demonstrated dose-
response gradients between physical activity and
health outcomes. As a result of these findings, the
most recent CDC-ACSM guidelines recommend that
all adults perform 30 or more minutes of moderate-
intensity physical activity on most, and preferably
all, days—either in a single session or “accumulated”
in multiple bouts, each lasting at least 8–10 minutes
(Pate et al. 1995). This guideline thus significantly
differs from the earlier ones on three points: it
reduces the minimum starting exercise intensity
from 60 percent of maximal oxygen uptake to 50
percent in healthy adults and to 40 percent in pa-
tients or persons with very low fitness; it increases
the frequency of exercise sessions from 3 days per
week to 5–7 days per week, depending on intensity
and session duration; and it includes the option of
accumulating the minimum of 30 minutes per day in
multiple sessions lasting at least 8–10 minutes (Pate
et al. 1995). This modification in advice acknowl-
edges that people who are sedentary and who do not
enjoy, or are otherwise not able to maintain, a regi-
men of regular, vigorous activity can still derive
substantial benefit from more moderate physical
activity as long as it is done regularly.
The NIH Consensus Development Conference
Statement on Physical Activity and Cardiovascular
Health identifies physical inactivity as a major pub-
lic health problem in the United States and issues a
call to action to increase physical activity levels
among persons in all population groups. (See Ap-
pendix B for full text of the recommendations.) The
core recommendations, similar to those jointly made
by the CDC and the ACSM (Pate et al. 1995), call for
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET Project DLLs for Deleting PDF Document Page. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add and delete pages in pdf online; add page to pdf without acrobat
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Add Sticky Note on PDF Page in C#.NET. Add necessary references:
adding pages to a pdf; adding page numbers pdf file
24
Physical Activity and Health
Table 2-2.  Selected physical activity recommendations in the United States (1965–1996)
Source
Objective
Type/mode
PCPF (1965)
Physical fitness
General fitness
AHA Recommendations (1972)
CHD prevention
Endurance
YMCA (1973)
General health and fitness
Endurance, strength, flexibility
ACSM Guidelines (1975)
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Endurance, strength, flexibility
AHA Recommendations (1975)
Secondary prevention in patients
Endurance
with heart disease
ACSM Position Statement (1978)
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Endurance
and body composition
USDHEW–Healthy People (1979)
Disease prevention/
Endurance
health promotion
ACSM Guidelines (1980)
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Endurance, strength, flexibility
ACSM Guidelines (1986)
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Endurance, strength, flexibility
USDHHS–Surgeon General’s Report
Weight control
Endurance
on Nutrition and Health (1988)
USPSTF (1989)
Primary prevention in clinical practice
Not specified, implied endurance
ACSM Position Stand (1990)
Cardiorespiratory and muscular
Endurance, strength
fitness
ACSM Guidelines (1991)
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Endurance, strength, flexibility
USHHS/USDA Dietary
Health promotion/disease prevention,
Not specified
Guidelines (1990)
weight maintenance
AACVPR (1991)
Cardiac rehabilitation
Endurance, strength
DHHS-Healthy People 2000 (1991)*
Disease prevention/health promotion
Endurance, strength, flexibility
AHA Position Statement (1992)
CVD prevention and rehabilitation
Endurance
AHA Standards (1992 and 1995)
CHD prevention and rehabilitation
Endurance, strength
AACVPR (1993)
Pulmonary rehabilitation
Endurance
ACSM Position Statement (1993)
Prevention and treatment
Endurance, strength
of hypertension
25
Historical Background, Terminology, Evolution of Recommendations, and Measurement
Endurance
Resistance training
Intensity
Frequency
Duration
Five levels
5 x week
Approximately 30 minutes
Selected calisthenics
70–85% MHR
3–7 x week
15–20 minutes
Not addressed
80%
˙
VO
max
3 x week
40–45 minutes
Not specified
60–90%
˙
VO
max
3 x week
20–30 minutes
Not specified
60–90% HRR
70–85% MHR
3–4 x week
20–60 minutes
Not addressed
50–85%
˙
VO
max
3–5 x week
15–60 minutes
Not addressed
50–85% HRR
60–90% MHR
Moderate/hard
3 x week
15–30 minutes
Not addressed
50–85%
˙
VO
max/HRR
3–5 x week
15–60 minutes
Not specified
60–90% MHR
50–85%
˙
VO
max/HRR
3–5 x week
15–60 minutes
Not specified
60–90% MHR
Not specified
‡ 3 x week
‡ 20 minutes
Not addressed
At least moderate
Not specified
Not specified
Not addressed
50–85%
˙
VO
max
3–5 x week
20–60 minutes
1 set, 8–12 repetitions
50–85% HRR
8–10 exercises
60–90% MHR
2 days x week
40–85%
˙
VO
max
3–5 x week
15–60 minutes
Not specified
55–90% MHR
RPE = 12–16
Not specified
Not specified
Not specified
Not addressed
Exercise following ACSM
3–5 x week
15–60 minutes
1–3 sets,12–15 repetitions
(1986) and AHA (1983)
major muscle groups
recommendations
2–3 days x week
Light/moderate/vigorous
3–5 x week
20–30 minutes
Not specified
> 50%
˙
VO
max
3–4 x week
30–60 minutes
Not addressed
50–60%
˙
VO
max
‡ 3 x week
‡ 30 minutes
1 set, 10–15 repetitions
50–60%  HR reserve
8–10 exercises,
2–3 days x week
60% HR reserve
3 x week
20–30 minutes
Not addressed
40–70%
˙
VO
max
3–5 x week
20–60 minutes
Not specified
26
Physical Activity and Health
Table 2-2.
Continued
Source
Objective
Type/mode
AHA Position
CVD prevention
Moderate intensity
Statement (1993)
and rehabilitation
(i.e., brisk walking) integrated
into daily routine
ACSM Position Stand (1994)
Secondary prevention in patients
Endurance, strength
with coronary heart disease
AHA Position Statement (1994)
Cardiac rehabilitation
Endurance and strength training
of moderate intensity following
other guidelines
Physical Activity Guidelines
Lifetime health promotion
Endurance
for Adolescents (1994)
for adolescents
AACVPR (1995)
Cardiac rehabilitation
Endurance, strength
ACSM Guidelines (1995)
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Endurance, strength
and muscular fitness
ACSM Position Stand (1995)
Prevention of osteoporosis
Strength, flexibility, coordination,
cardiorespiratory fitness
AHCPR (1995)
Cardiac rehabilitation
Endurance, strength
AMA Guidelines for
Health promotion/
Endurance
Adolescent Preventive
physical fitness
Services (GAPS) (1994)
CDC/ACSM (1995)
Health promotion
Endurance
USHHS/USDA Dietary
Health promotion/disease
Endurance
Guidelines (1995)
prevention, weight maintenance
NHLBI Consensus Conference
CVD prevention for adults and
Endurance
(1996)
children and cardiac rehabilitation
USPSTF (1996)
Primary prevention
Endurance, strength, flexibility
in clinical practice
27
Historical Background, Terminology, Evolution of Recommendations, and Measurement
Endurance
Resistance training
Intensity
Frequency
Duration
Not specified
Not specified
Not specified
Not addressed
40–85%
˙
VO
max
3 x week,
20–40 minutes
Not specified
40–85% HRR
nonconsecutive days
55–90% MHR
Not specified
Not specified
Not specified
Not specified
Moderate/vigorous
3 x  week, vigorous
‡ 20 minutes, vigorous
Not addressed
daily, moderate
not specified, moderate
> 50%
˙
VO
max
3–5 x week
30–45 minutes, 200–300
1 set, 10–15 repetitions,
RPE 12–14
kcal per session or
major muscle groups
1,000–1,500 kcal per week
2–3 days x week
40–85%
˙
VO
max/HRR
3-5 x week
12–15 minutes initially:
1 set, 8–12 repetitions
RPE 12–16
20–30 minutes for
8–10 exercises
conditioning and
2 days x week
maintaining
Not specified
Not specified
Not specified
Not specified
70–85% MHR
3 x week
20–40 minutes
Not specified
Moderate
‡ 3 x week
20–30 minutes
Not addressed
Moderate/hard
All or most days
‡ 30 minutes per day
Not specified
in bouts of at least 8–10
minutes
Moderate
All or most days
‡ 30 minutes per day
Not addressed
Moderate/hard
All or most days
‡ 30 minutes per day
Not addressed
Moderate
Most days
30 minutes
Not specified
*See Appendix B for listing of objectives.
See Sallis and Patrick, 1994. See Pate et al., 1995.
Key to associations:  AACVPR = American Association for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation; ACSM = American College of Sports
Medicine; AHA = American Heart Association; AHCPR = Agency for Health Care Policy and Research; CDC = Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention; NHLBI = National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; PCPF = President’s Council on Physical Fitness; USDA = United States Department
of Agriculture; USDHEW = United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; USDHHS = United States Department of Health and
Human Services; USPSTF = United States Preventive Services Task Force; YMCA = Young Men’s Christian Association.
Key to abbreviations:  CHD = coronary heart disease; CVD = cardiovascular disease; HRR = heart rate reserve; MHR = maximal heart rate;
RPE = rating of perceived exertion;
˙
VO
max  = maximal oxygen uptake.
Not addressed = not included in recommendations. Not specified = recommended but not quantified.
28
Physical Activity and Health
all children and adults to accumulate at least 30
minutes per day of moderate-intensity physical
activity. The recommendations also acknowledge
that persons already achieving this minimum could
experience greater benefits by increasing either the
duration or the intensity of activity. In addition, the
statement recommends more widespread use of car-
diac rehabilitation programs that include physical
activity.
The consensus statement from the 1993 Inter-
national Consensus Conference on Physical Activ-
ity Guidelines for Adolescents (Sallis and Patrick
1994) emphasizes that adolescents should be physi-
cally active every day as part of general lifestyle
activities and that they should engage in 3 or more
20-minute sessions of moderate to vigorous exer-
cise each week. The American Academy of Pediat-
rics has issued several statements encouraging active
play in preschool children, assessment of children’s
activity levels, and evaluation of physical fitness
(1992, 1994). Both the consensus statement and
the American Academy of Pediatrics’ statements
emphasize active play, parental involvement, and
generally active lifestyles rather than specific vigor-
ous exercise training. They also acknowledge the
need for appropriate school physical education
curricula.
Recognizing the important interrelationship of
nutrition and physical activity in achieving a balance
between energy consumed and energy expended, the
1988 Surgeon General’s Report on Nutrition and
Health (USDHHS 1988) recommended physical ac-
tivities such as walking, jogging, and bicycling for at
least 20 minutes, 3 times per week. The 1995 Dietary
Guidelines for Americans greatly expanded physical
activity guidance to maintain and improve weight.
The bulletin recommends that all Americans engage
in 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity
on all, or most, days of the week (USDA/USDHHS
1995).
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
(USPSTF) has recommended that health care pro-
viders counsel all patients on the importance of
incorporating physical activities into their daily
routines to prevent coronary heart disease, hyper-
tension, obesity, and diabetes (Harris et al. 1989;
USPSTF 1989, 1996). Similarly, the American
Medical Association’s Guidelines for Adolescent
Preventive Services (GAPS) (AMA 1994) recom-
mends that physicians provide annual physical ac-
tivity counseling to all adolescents.
Summary of Recent Physical
Activity Recommendations
Sedentary persons can increase their physical activ-
ity in many ways. The traditional, structured ap-
proach originally described by the ACSM and others
involved rather specific recommendations regard-
ing type, frequency, intensity, and duration of ac-
tivity. Recommended activities typically included
fast walking, running, cycling, swimming, or aero-
bics classes. More recently, physical activity recom-
mendations have adopted a lifestyle approach to
increasing activity (Pate et al. 1995). This method
involves common activities, such as brisk walking,
climbing stairs (rather than taking the elevator),
doing more house and yard work, and engaging in
active recreational pursuits. Recent physical activity
recommendations thus acknowledge both the struc-
tured and lifestyle approaches to increasing physical
activity. Either approach can be beneficial for a
sedentary person, and individual interests and op-
portunities should determine which is used. The
most recent recommendations cited agree on sev-
eral points:
• All people over the age of 2 years should
accumulate at least 30 minutes of endurance-
type physical activity, of at least moderate
intensity, on most—preferably all—days of
the week.
• Additional health and functional benefits of
physical activity can be achieved by adding
more time in moderate-intensity activity, or
by substituting more vigorous activity.
• Persons with symptomatic CVD, diabetes, or
other chronic health problems who would like
to increase their physical activity should be
evaluated by a physician and provided an
exercise program appropriate for their clinical
status.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested