c# asp.net pdf viewer : Add page number to pdf file Library SDK class asp.net .net winforms ajax sgrfull6-part2025

39
Historical Background, Terminology, Evolution of Recommendations, and Measurement
1.4
Increase to at least 20 percent the proportion of people aged 18 and older and to at least 75 percent the
proportion of children and adolescents aged 6–17 who engage in vigorous physical activity that
promotes the development and maintenance of cardiorespiratory fitness 3 or more days per week for
20 or more minutes per occasion.
Special Population Targets
Vigorous Physical Activity
2000 Target
1.4a
Lower-income people aged 18 and older
12%
(annual family income <$20,000)
1.4b
Blacks aged 18 years and older
17%
1.4c
Hispanics aged 18 years and older
17%
Note: Vigorous physical activities are rhythmic, repetitive physical activities that use large muscle groups at 60 percent or more of maximum heart rate for age.
An exercise rate of 60 percent of maximum heart rate for age is about 50 percent of maximal cardiorespiratory capacity and is sufficient for cardiorespiratory
conditioning.  Maximum heart rate equals roughly 220 beats per minute minus age.
1.5
Reduce to no more than 15 percent the proportion of people aged 6 and older who engage in no leisure-
time physical activity.
Special Population Targets
No Leisure-Time Physical Activity
2000 Target
1.5a
People aged 65 and older
22%
1.5b
People with disabilities
20%
1.5c
Lower-income people (annual family
17%
income <$20,000)
1.5d
Blacks aged 18 and older
20%
1.5e
Hispanics aged 18 and older
25%
1.5f
American Indians/Alaska Natives aged 18 and older
21%
Note:  For this objective, people with disabilities are people who report any limitation in activity due to chronic conditions.
1.6
Increase to at least 40 percent the proportion of people aged 6 and older who regularly perform physical
activities that enhance and maintain muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility.
1.7*
Increase to at least 50 percent the proportion of overweight people aged 12 and older who have adopted
sound dietary practices combined with regular physical activity to attain an appropriate body weight.
Special Population Targets
Adoption of Weight-Loss Practices
2000 Target
1.7a
Overweight Hispanic males
24%
aged 18 and older
1.7b
Overweight Hispanic females
22%
aged 18 and older
Services and Protection Objectives
1.8
Increase to at least 50 percent the proportion of children and adolescents in 1st–12th grade who
participate in daily school physical education.
1.9
Increase to at least 50 percent the proportion of school physical education class time that students spend
being physically active, preferably engaged in lifetime physical activities.
Add page number to pdf file - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page to a pdf; adding a page to a pdf file
Add page number to pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page number pdf; add page numbers to pdf files
40
Physical Activity and Health
Note:  Lifetime activities are activities that may be readily carried into adulthood because they generally need only one or two people.  Examples include swimming,
bicycling, jogging, and racquet sports.  Also counted as lifetime activities are vigorous social activities such as dancing.  Competitive group sports and activities
typically played only by young children such as group games are excluded.
1.10
Increase the proportion of worksites offering employer-sponsored physical activity and fitness
programs as follows:
Worksite Size
2000 Target
50–99 employees
20%
100–249 employees
35%
250–749 employees
50%
>750 employees
80%
1.11
Increase community availability and accessibility of physical activity and fitness facilities as follows:
Facility
2000 Target
Hiking, biking, and fitness trail miles
1 per 10,000 people
Public swimming pools
1 per 25,000 people
Acres of park and recreation open space
4 per 1,000 people
(250 people per managed acre)
1.12
Increase to at least 50 percent the proportion of primary care providers who routinely assess and counsel
their patients regarding the frequency, duration, type, and intensity of each patient’s physical activity
practices.
Health Status Objective
1.13* Reduce to no more than 90 per 1,000 people the proportion of all people aged 65 and older who have
difficulty in performing two or more personal care activities thereby preserving independence.
Special Population Targets
Difficulty Performing
Self Care (per 1,000)
2000 Target
1.13a People aged 85 and older
325
1.13b Blacks aged 65 and older
98
Note:  Personal care activities are bathing, dressing, using the toilet, getting in and out of bed or chair, and eating.
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
If your page number is set as 1, then the two output PDF files will contains the first page and the later three pages Add necessary references:
adding page numbers to pdf in preview; add page numbers to pdf document in preview
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages Add necessary references
adding page numbers to a pdf in preview; add page number pdf file
41
Historical Background, Terminology, Evolution of Recommendations, and Measurement
Appendix B:  NIH Consensus
Conference Statement
In Press (3/18/96)
National Institutes of Health
Consensus Development Conference Statement
Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health
December 18–20, 1995
NIH Consensus Statements are prepared by a
nonadvocate, non-Federal panel of experts, based on
(1) presentations by investigators working in areas
relevant to the consensus questions during a 2-day
public session; (2) questions and statements from
conference attendees during open discussion peri-
ods that are part of the public session; and (3) closed
deliberations by the panel during the remainder of
the second day and morning of the third. This
statement is an independent report of the panel and
is not a policy statement of the NIH or the Federal
Government.
Abstract
Objective. To provide physicians and the general
public with a responsible assessment of the relation-
ship between physical activity and cardiovascular
health.
Participants. A non-Federal, nonadvocate, 13-
member panel representing the fields of cardiology,
psychology, exercise physiology, nutrition, pediat-
rics, public health, and epidemiology. In addition, 27
experts in cardiology, psychology, epidemiology,
exercise physiology, geriatrics, nutrition, pediatrics,
public health, and sports medicine presented data to
the panel and a conference audience of 600.
Evidence. The literature was searched through
Medline and an extensive bibliography of references
was provided to the panel and the conference audi-
ence. Experts prepared abstracts with relevant cita-
tions from the literature. Scientific evidence was
given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience.
Consensus Process. The panel, answering pre-
defined questions, developed their conclusions
based on the scientific evidence presented in open
forum and the scientific literature. The panel com-
posed a draft statement that was read in its entirety
and circulated to the experts and the audience for
comment. Thereafter, the panel resolved conflict-
ing recommendations and released a revised state-
ment at the end of the conference. The panel
finalized the revisions within a few weeks after the
conference.
Conclusions. All Americans should engage in
regular physical activity at a level appropriate to
their capacity, needs, and interest. Children and
adults alike should set a goal of accumulating at
least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical
activity on most, and preferably, all days of the
week. Most Americans have little or no physical
activity in their daily lives, and accumulating evi-
dence indicates that physical inactivity is a major
risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However,
moderate levels of physical activity confer signifi-
cant health benefits. Even those who currently
meet these daily standards may derive additional
health and fitness benefits by becoming more physi-
cally active or including more vigorous activity. For
those with known cardiovascular disease, cardiac
rehabilitation programs that combine physical ac-
tivity with reduction in other risk factors should be
more widely used.
Introduction
Over the past 25 years, the United States has experi-
enced a steady decline in the age- adjusted death toll
from cardiovascular disease (CVD), primarily in
mortality caused by coronary heart disease and stroke.
Despite this decline, coronary heart disease remains
the leading cause of death and stroke the third
leading cause of death. Lifestyle improvements by
the American public and better control of the risk
factors for heart disease and stroke have been major
factors in this decline.
Coronary heart disease and stroke have many
causes. Modifiable risk factors include smoking,
high blood pressure, blood lipid levels, obesity, dia-
betes, and physical inactivity. In contrast to the
positive national trends observed with cigarette smok-
ing, high blood pressure, and high blood cholesterol,
obesity and physical inactivity in the United States
have not improved. Indeed automation and other
technologies have contributed greatly to lessening
physical activity at work and home.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
pageIndex, The page index of the PDF page that will be 0
add a page to pdf file; add a page to a pdf in acrobat
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF users to do multiple manipulations on PDF file and page Please note that, PDF page number starts from
add page to pdf online; add page number to pdf hyperlink
42
Physical Activity and Health
The purpose of this conference was to examine
the accumulating evidence on the role of physical
activity in the prevention and treatment of CVD and
its risk factors.
Physical activity in this statement is defined as
“bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles
that requires energy expenditure” and produces
healthy benefits. Exercise, a type of physical activity,
is defined as “a planned, structured, and repetitive
bodily movement done to improve or maintain one
or more components of physical fitness.” Physical
inactivity denotes a level of activity less than that
needed to maintain good health.
Physical inactivity characterizes most Ameri-
cans. Exertion has been systematically engineered
out of most occupations and lifestyles. In 1991, 54
percent of adults reported little or no regular leisure
physical activity. Data from the 1990 Youth Risk
Behavior Survey show that most teenagers in grades
9-12 are not performing regular vigorous activity.
About 50 percent of high school students reported
they are not enrolled in physical education classes.
Physical activity protects against the develop-
ment of CVD and also favorably modifies other CVD
risk factors, including high blood pressure, blood
lipid levels, insulin resistance, and obesity. The type,
frequency, and intensity of physical activity that are
needed to accomplish these goals remain poorly
defined and controversial.
Physical activity is also important in the treat-
ment of patients with CVD or those who are at
increased risk for developing CVD, including pa-
tients who have hypertension, stable angina, or pe-
ripheral vascular disease, or who have had a prior
myocardial infarction or heart failure. Physical activ-
ity is an important component of cardiac rehabilita-
tion, and people with CVD can benefit from
participation. However, some questions remain re-
garding benefits, risks, and costs associated with
becoming physically active.
Many factors influence adopting and maintaining
a physically active lifestyle, such as socioeconomic
status, cultural influences, age, and health status.
Understanding is needed on how such variables in-
fluence the adoption of this behavior at the individual
level. Intervention strategies for encouraging indi-
viduals from different backgrounds to adopt and
adhere to a physically active lifestyle need to be
developed and tested. Different environments such
as schools, worksites, health care settings, and the
home can play a role in promoting physical activity.
These community-level factors also need to be better
understood.
To address these and related issues, the NIH’s
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Office
of Medical Applications of Research convened a
Consensus Development Conference on Physical
Activity and Cardiovascular Health. The conference
was cosponsored by the NIH’s National Institute of
Child Health and Human Development, National
Institute on Aging, National Institute of Arthritis and
Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Insti-
tute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases,
National Institute of Nursing Research, Office of
Research on Women’s Health, and Office of Disease
Prevention, as well as the Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention and the President’s Council on
Physical Fitness and Sports.
The conference brought together specialists in
medicine, exercise physiology, health behavior, epi-
demiology, nutrition, physical therapy, and nursing
as well as representatives from the public. After a day
and a half of presentations and audience discussion,
an independent, non-Federal consensus panel
weighed the scientific evidence and developed a
draft statement that addressed the following five
questions.
• What is the health burden of a sedentary lifetyle
on the population?
• What type, what intensity, and what quantity of
physical activity are important to prevent car-
diovascular disease?
• What are the benefits and risks of different
types of physical activity for people with car-
diovascular disease?
• What are the successful approaches to adopting
and maintaining a physically active lifestyle?
• What are the important questions for future
research?
1. What Is the Health Burden of a Sedentary
Lifestyle on the Population?
Physical inactivity among the U.S. population is now
widespread. National surveillance programs have
documented that about one in four adults (more
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Add necessary references: Description: Search specified string from all the PDF pages. eg: The first page is 0. 0
adding page numbers pdf; add a blank page to a pdf
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. matchString, The string wil be deleted from PDF file, -. 0
add and delete pages from pdf; add page to pdf acrobat
43
Historical Background, Terminology, Evolution of Recommendations, and Measurement
women than men) currently have sedentary lifestyles
with no leisure time physical activity. An additional
one-third of adults are insufficiently active to achieve
health benefits. The prevalence of inactivity varies by
gender, age, ethnicity, health status, and geographic
region but is common to all demographic groups.
Change in physical exertion associated with occupa-
tion has declined markedly in this century.
Girls become less active than do boys as they grow
older. Children become far less active as they move
through adolescence. Obesity is increasing among
children, at least in part related to physical inactivity.
Data indicate that obese children and adolescents
have a high risk of becoming obese adults, and obesity
in adulthood is related to coronary artery disease,
hypertension, and diabetes. Thus, the prevention of
childhood obesity has the potential of preventing
CVD in adults. At age 12, 70 percent of children report
participation in vigorous physical activity; by age 21
this activity falls to 42 percent for men and 30 percent
for women. Furthermore, as adults age, their physical
activity levels continue to decline.
Although knowledge about physical inactivity as
a risk factor for CVD has come mainly from investiga-
tions of middle-aged, white men, more limited evi-
dence from studies in women minority groups and the
elderly suggests that the findings are similar in these
groups. On the basis of current knowledge, we must
note that physical inactivity occurs disproportion-
ately among Americans who are not well educated and
who are socially or economically disadvantaged.
Physical activity is directly related to physical
fitness. Although the means of measuring physical
activity have varied between studies (i.e., there is no
standardization of measures), evidence indicates that
physical inactivity and lack of physical fitness are
directly associated with increased mortality from
CVD. The increase in mortality is not entirely ex-
plained by the association with elevated blood pres-
sure, smoking, and blood lipid levels.
There is an inverse relationship between mea-
sures of physical activity and indices of obesity in
most U.S. population studies. Only a few studies
have examined the relationship between physical
activity and body fat distribution, and these suggest
an inverse relationship between levels of physical
activity and visceral fat. There is evidence that in-
creased physical activity facilitates weight loss and
that the addition of physical activity to dietary en-
ergy restriction can increase and help to maintain
loss of body weight and body fat mass.
Middle-aged and older men and women who
engage in regular physical activity have significantly
higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol
levels than do those who are sedentary. When exercise
training has extended to at least 12 weeks, beneficial
HDL cholesterol level changes have been reported.
Most studies of endurance exercise training of
individuals with normal blood pressure and those
with hypertension have shown decreases in systolic
and diastolic blood pressure. Insulin sensitivity is
also improved with endurance exercise.
A number of factors that affect thrombotic
function—including hematocrit, fibrinogen, plate-
let function, and fibrinolysis—are related to the risk
of CVD. Regular endurance exercise lowers the risk
related to these factors.
The burden of CVD rests most heavily on the
least active. In addition to its powerful impact on the
cardiovascular system, physical inactivity is also
associated with other adverse health effects, includ-
ing osteoporosis, diabetes, and some cancers.
2. What Type, What Intensity, and What
Quantity of Physical Activity Are Important
to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease?
Activity that reduces CVD risk factors and confers
many other health benefits does not require a struc-
tured or vigorous exercise program. The majority of
benefits of physical activity can be gained by per-
forming moderate-intensity activities. The amount
or type of physical activity needed for health benefits
or optimal health is a concern due to limited time and
competing activities for most Americans. The amount
and types of physical activity that are needed to
prevent disease and promote health must, therefore,
be clearly communicated, and effective strategies
must be developed to promote physical activity to
the public.
The quantitative relationship between level of
activity or fitness and magnitude of cardiovascular
benefit may extend across the full range of activity. A
moderate level of physical activity confers health
benefits. However, physical activity must be per-
formed regularly to maintain these effects.
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
200F); annot.EndPoint = new PointF(300F, 400F); // add annotation to The string wil be highlighted from PDF file, 0
add pages to pdf without acrobat; add pages to pdf acrobat
C# Word - Split Word Document in C#.NET
your page number is set as 1, then the two output Word files will contains the first page and the later three pages respectively. C# DLLs: Split Word File. Add
add page number to pdf preview; add page to existing pdf file
44
Physical Activity and Health
Moderate=intensity activity performed by previously
sedentary individuals results in significant improve-
ment in many health-related outcomes. These mod-
erate intensity activities are more likely to be
continued than are high-intensity activities.
We recommend that all people in the United
States increase their regular physical activity to a
level appropriate to their capacities, needs, and inter-
est. We recommend that all children and adults
should set a long-term goal to accumulate at least 30
minutes or more of moderate-intensity physical ac-
tivity on most, or preferably all, days of the week.
Intermittent or shorter bouts of activity (at least 10
minutes), including occupational, nonoccupational,
or tasks of daily living, also have similar cardiovascu-
lar and health benefits if performed at a level of
moderate intensity (such as brisk walking, cycling,
swimming, home repair, and yardwork) with an
accumulated duration of at least 30 minutes per day.
People who currently meet the recommended mini-
mal standards may derive additional health and
fitness benefits from becoming more physically ac-
tive or including more vigorous activity.
Some evidence suggests lowered mortality with
more vigorous activity, but further research is needed
to more specifically define safe and effective levels.
The most active individuals have lower cardiovascu-
lar morbidity and mortality rates than do those who
are least active; however, much of the benefit appears
to be accounted for by comparing the least active
individuals to those who are moderately active. Fur-
ther increases in the intensity or amount of activity
produce further benefits in some, but not all, param-
eters of risk. High-intensity activity is also associated
with an increased risk of injury, discontinuation of
activity, or acute cardiac events during the activity.
Current low rates of regular activity in Americans
may be partially due to the mis-perception of many
that vigorous, continuous exercise is necessary to
reap health benefits.  Many people, for example, fail
to appreciate walking as “exercise” or to recognize
the substantial benefits of short bouts (at least 10
minutes) of moderate-level activity.
The frequency, intensity, and duration of activ-
ity are interrelated. The number of episodes of
activity recommended for health depends on the
intensity and/or duration of the activity: higher
intensity or longer duration activity could be per-
formed approximately three times weekly and
achieve cardiovascular benefits, but low-intensity
or shorter duration activities should be performed
more often to achieve cardiovascular benefits.
The appropriate type of activity is best deter-
mined by the individual’s preferences and what will
be sustained. Exercise, or a structured program of
activity, is a subset of activity that may encourage
interest and allow for more vigorous activity. People
who perform more formal exercise (i.e., structured
or planned exercise programs) can accumulate this
daily total through a variety of recreational or sports
activities. People who are currently sedentary or
minimally active should gradually build up to the
recommended goal of 30 minutes of moderate activ-
ity daily by adding a few minutes each day until
reaching their personal goal to reduce the risk asso-
ciated with suddenly increasing the amount or inten-
sity of exercise. (The defined levels of effort depend
on individual characteristics such as baseline fitness
and health status.)
Developing muscular strength and joint flexibil-
ity is also important for an overall activity program to
improve one’s ability to perform tasks and to reduce
the potential for injury. Upper extremity and resis-
tance (or strength) training can improve muscular
function, and evidence suggests that there may be
cardiovascular benefits, especially in older patients
or those with underlying CVD, but further research
and guidelines are needed. Older people or those
who have been deconditioned from recent inactivity
or illness may particularly benefit from resistance
training due to improved ability in accomplishing
tasks of daily living. Resistance training may contrib-
ute to better balance, coordination, and agility that
may help prevent falls in the elderly.
Physical activity carries risks as well as benefits.
The most common adverse effects of activity relate to
musculoskeletal injury and are usually mild and self-
limited. The risk of injury increases with increased
intensity, frequency, and duration of activity and
also depends on the type of activity. Exercise-related
injuries can be reduced by moderating these param-
eters. A more serious but rare complication of activ-
ity is myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death.
Although persons who engage in vigorous physical
45
Historical Background, Terminology, Evolution of Recommendations, and Measurement
activity have a slight increase in risk of sudden
cardiac death during activity, the health benefits
outweigh this risk because of the large overall risk
reduction.
In children and young adults, exertion-related
deaths are uncommon and are generally related to
congenital heart defects (e.g., hypertrophic cardi-
omyopathy, Marfan’s syndrome, severe aortic valve
stenosis, prolonged QT syndromes, cardiac conduc-
tion abnormalities) or to acquired myocarditis. It is
recommended that patients with those conditions
remain active but not participate in vigorous or
competitive athletics.
Because the risks of physical activity are very low
compared with the health benefits, most adults do
not need medical consultation or pretesting before
starting a moderate-intensity physical activity pro-
gram. However, those with known CVD and men
over age 40 and women over age 50 with multiple
cardiovascular risk factors who contemplate a pro-
gram of vigorous activity should have a medical
evaluation prior to initiating such a program.
3. What Are the Benefits and Risks of
Different Types of Physical Activity for
People with Cardiovascular Disease?
More than 10 million Americans are afflicted with
clinically significant CVD, including myocardial in-
farction, angina pectoris, peripheral vascular dis-
ease, and congestive heart failure. In addition, more
than 300,000 patients per year are currently sub-
jected to coronary artery bypass surgery and a similar
number to percutaneous transluminal coronary
angioplasty. Increased physical activity appears to
benefit each of these groups. Benefits include reduc-
tion in cardiovascular mortality, reduction of symp-
toms, improvement in exercise tolerance and
functional capacity, and improvement in psycho-
logical well-being and quality of life.
Several studies have shown that exercise training
programs significantly reduce overall mortality, as
well as death caused by myocardial infarction. The
reported reductions in mortality have been highest—
approximately 25 percent—in cardiac rehabilitation
programs that have included control of other cardio-
vascular risk factors. Rehabilitation programs using
both moderate and vigorous physical activity have
been associated with reductions in fatal cardiac events,
although the minimal or optimal level and duration
of exercise required to achieve beneficial effects
remains uncertain. Data are inadequate to determine
whether stroke incidence is affected by physical
activity or exercise training.
The risk of death during medically supervised
cardiac exercise training programs is very low. How-
ever, those who exercise infrequently and have poor
functional capacity at baseline may be at somewhat
higher risk during exercise training. All patients
with CVD should have a medical evaluation prior to
participation in a vigorous exercise program.
Appropriately prescribed and conducted exer-
cise training programs improve exercise tolerance
and physical fitness in patients with coronary heart
disease. Moderate as well as vigorous exercise train-
ing regimens are of value. Patients with low basal
levels of exercise capacity experience the most func-
tional benefits, even at relatively modest levels of
physical activity. Patients with angina pectoris typi-
cally experience improvement in angina in associa-
tion with a reduction in effort-induced myocardial
ischemia, presumably as a result of decreased myo-
cardial oxygen demand and increased work capacity.
Patients with congestive heart failure also appear
to show improvement in symptoms, exercise capac-
ity, and functional well-being in response to exercise
training, even though left ventricular systolic func-
tion appears to be unaffected. The exercise program
should be tailored to the needs of these patients and
supervised closely in view of the marked predisposi-
tion of these patients to ischemic events and
arrhythmias.
Cardiac rehabilitation exercise training often
improves skeletal muscle strength and oxidative
capacity and, when combined with appropriate nu-
tritional changes, may result in weight loss. In addi-
tion, such training generally results in improvement
in measures of psychological status, social adjust-
ment, and functional capacity. However, cardiac
rehabilitation exercise training has less influence on
rates of return to work than many nonexercise vari-
ables, including employer attitudes, prior employ-
ment status, and economic incentives. Multifactorial
intervention programs, including nutritional changes
and medication plus exercise, are needed to improve
health status and reduce cardiovascular disease risk.
46
Physical Activity and Health
Cardiac rehabilitation programs have tradition-
ally been institutional-based and group-centered (e.g.,
hospitals, clinics, community centers). Referral and
enrollment rates have been relatively low, generally
ranging from 10 to 25 percent of patients with CHD.
Referral rates are lower for women than for men and
lower for non-whites than for whites. Home-based
programs have the potential to provide rehabilitative
services to a wider population. Home-based pro-
grams incorporating limited hospital visits with regu-
lar mail or telephone followup by a nurse case
manager have demonstrated significant increases in
functional capacity, smoking cessation, and improve-
ment in blood lipid levels. A range of options exists
in cardiac rehabilitation including site, number of
visits, monitoring, and other services.
There are clear medical and economic reasons
for carrying out cardiac rehabilitation programs.
Optimal outcomes are achieved when exercise train-
ing is combined with educational messages and
feedback about changing lifestyle. Patients who par-
ticipate in cardiac rehabilitation programs show a
lower incidence of rehospitalization and lower
charges per hospitalization. Cardiac rehabilitation is
a cost-efficient therapeutic modality that should be
used more frequently.
4. What Are the Successful Approaches to
Adopting and Maintaining a Physically
Active Lifestyle?
The cardiovascular benefits from and physiological
reactions to physical activity appear to be similar
among diverse population subgroups defined by age,
sex, income, region of residence, ethnic background,
and health status. However, the behavioral and atti-
tudinal factors that influence the motivation for and
ability to sustain physical activity are strongly deter-
mined by social experiences, cultural background,
and physical disability and health status. For ex-
ample, perceptions of appropriate physical activity
differ by gender, age, weight, marital status, family
roles and responsibilities, disability, and social class.
Thus, the following general guidelines will need to
be further refined when one is planning with or
prescribing for specific individuals and population
groups, but generally physical activity is more likely
to be initiated and maintained if the individual
• Perceives a net benefit.
• Chooses an enjoyable activity.
• Feels competent doing the activity.
• Feels safe doing the activity.
• Can easily access the activity on a regular basis.
• Can fit the activity into the daily schedule.
• Feels that the activity does not generate financial
or social costs that he or she is unwilling to bear.
• Experiences a minimum of negative conse-
quences such as injury, loss of time, negative
peer pressure, and problems with self-identity.
• Is able to successfully address issues of compet-
ing time demands.
• Recognizes the need to balance the use of labor-
saving devices (e.g., power lawn mowers, golf
carts, automobiles) and sedentary activities (e.g.,
watching television, use of computers) with
activities that involve a higher level of physical
exertion.
Other people in the individual’s social environ-
ment can influence the adoption and maintenance of
physical activity.  Health care providers have a key
role in promoting smoking cessation and other risk-
reduction behaviors. Preliminary evidence suggests
that this also applies to physical activity. It is highly
probable that people will be more likely to increase
their physical activity if their health care provider
counsels them to do so. Providers can do this effec-
tively by learning to recognize stages of behavior
change, to communicate the need for increased ac-
tivity, to assist the patient in initiating activity, and
by following up appropriately.
Family and friends can also be important sources
of support for behavior change. For example, spouses
or friends can serve as “buddies,” joining in the
physical activity; or a spouse could offer to take on a
household task, giving his or her mate time to engage
in physical activity. Parents can support their
children’s activity by providing transportation, praise,
and encouragement, and by participating in activi-
ties with their children.
Worksites have the potential to encourage in-
creased physical activity by offering opportunities,
reminders, and rewards for doing so. For example,
an appropriate indoor area can be set aside to enable
walking during lunch hours. Signs placed near
47
Historical Background, Terminology, Evolution of Recommendations, and Measurement
elevators can encourage the use of the stairs instead.
Discounts on parking fees can be offered to employ-
ees who elect to park in remote lots and walk.
Schools are a major community resource for
increasing physical activity, particularly given the
urgent need to develop strategies that affect children
and adolescents. As noted previously, there is now
clear evidence that U.S. children and adolescents
have become more obese. There is also evidence that
obese children and adolescents exercise less than
their leaner peers. All schools should provide oppor-
tunities for physical activities that
• Are appropriate and enjoyable for children of
all skill levels and are not limited to competitive
sports or physical education classes.
• Appeal to girls as well as to boys, and to children
from diverse backgrounds.
• Can serve as a foundation for activities through-
out life.
• Are offered on a daily basis.
Successful approaches may involve mass educa-
tion strategies or changes in institutional policies or
community variables. In some environments (e.g.,
schools, worksites, community centers), policy-level
interventions may be necessary to enable people to
achieve and maintain an adequate level of activity.
Policy changes that increase opportunities for physi-
cal activity can facilitate activity maintenance for
motivated individuals and increase readiness to
change among the less motivated. As in other areas
of health promotion, mass communication strate-
gies should be used to promote physical activity.
These strategies should include a variety of main-
stream channels and techniques to reach diverse
audiences that acquire information through differ-
ent media (e.g., TV, newspaper, radio, Internet).
5. What Are the Important Considerations
for Future Research?
While much has been learned about the role of
physical activity in cardiovascular health, there are
many unanswered questions.
• Maintain surveillance of physical activity levels
in the U.S. population by age, sex, geographic,
and socioeconomic measures.
• Develop better methods for analysis and quan-
tification of activity. These methods should be
applicable to both work and leisure time mea-
surements and provide direct quantitative esti-
mates of activity.
• Conduct physiologic, biochemical, and genetic
research necessary to define the mechanisms
by which activity affects CVD including changes
in metabolism as well as cardiac and vascular
effects. This will provide new insights into
cardiovascular biology that may have broader
implications than for other clinical outcomes.
• Examine the effects of physical activity and
cardiac rehabilitation programs on morbidity
and mortality in elderly individuals.
• Conduct research on the social and psychologi-
cal factors that influence adoption of a more
active lifestyle and the maintenance of that
behavior change throughout life.
• Carry out controlled randomized clinical trials
among children and adolescents to test the
effects of increased physical activity on CVD
risk factor levels including obesity. The effects
of intensity, frequency, and duration of in-
creased physical activity should be examined in
such studies.
Conclusions
Accumulating scientific evidence indicates that physi-
cal inactivity is a major risk factor for CVD. Moderate
levels of regular physical activity confer significant
health benefits. Unfortunately, most Americans have
little or no physical activity in their daily lives.
All Americans should engage in regular physical
activity at a level appropriate to their capacities,
needs, and interests. All children and adults should
set and reach a goal of accumulating at least 30
minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on
most, and preferably all, days of the week. Those who
currently meet these standards may derive additional
health and fitness benefits by becoming more physi-
cally active or including more vigorous activity.
Cardiac rehabilitation programs that combine
physical activity with reduction in other risk factors
should be more widely applied to those with known
CVD. Well-designed rehabilitation programs have
48
Physical Activity and Health
benefits that are lost because of these programs’
limited use.
Individuals with CVD and men over 40 or women
over 50 years of age with multiple cardiovascular risk
factors should have a medical evaluation prior to
embarking on a vigorous exercise program.
Recognizing the importance of individual and
societal factors in initiating and sustaining regular
physical activity, the panel recommends the following:
• Development of programs for health care pro-
viders to communicate to patients the impor-
tance of regular physical activity.
• Community support of regular physical activ-
ity with environmental and policy changes at
schools, worksites, community centers, and
other sites.
• Initiation of a coordinated national campaign
involving a consortium of collaborating health
organizations to encourage regular physical
activity.
• The implementation of the recommendations
in this statement has considerable potential to
improve the health and well-being of American
citizens.
About the NIH Consensus
Development Program
NIH Consensus Development Conferences are con-
vened to evaluate available scientific information
and resolve safety and efficacy issues related to a
biomedical technology. The resultant NIH Consen-
sus Statements are intended to advance understand-
ing of the technology or issue in question and to be
useful to health professionals and the public.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested