c# asp.net pdf viewer : Add page number pdf software control dll windows web page wpf web forms sgrfull9-part2028

69
Physiologic Responses and Long-Term Adaptations to Exercise
intensity aerobic activity primarily recruits these
fibers (Abernethy, Thayer, Taylor 1990). Prolonged
endurance training (i.e., months to years) can lead to
a transition of FT
b
fibers to FT
a
fibers, which have a
higher oxidative capacity (Abernethy, Thayer, Taylor
1990). No substantive evidence indicates that fast-
twitch fibers will convert to slow-twitch fibers under
normal training conditions (Jolesz and Sreter 1981).
Endurance training also increases the number of
capillaries in trained skeletal muscle, thereby allow-
ing a greater capacity for blood flow in the active
muscle (Terjung 1995).
Resistance-trained skeletal muscle exerts con-
siderably more force because of both increased muscle
size (hypertrophy) and increased muscle fiber re-
cruitment. Fiber hypertrophy is the result of in-
creases in both the size and number of myofibrils in
both fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscle fibers
(Kannus et al. 1992). Hyperplasia, or increased fiber
number, has been reported in animal studies, where
the number of individual muscle fibers can be counted
(Gonyea et al. 1986), and has been indirectly demon-
strated during autopsies on humans by using direct
fiber counts to compare dominant and nondominant
paired muscles (Sjöström et al. 1991).
During both aerobic and resistance exercise,
active muscles can undergo changes that lead to
muscle soreness. Some soreness is felt immediately
after exercise, and some can even occur during exer-
cise. This muscle soreness is generally not physically
limiting and dissipates rapidly. A more limiting sore-
ness, however, may occur 24 to 48 hours following
exercise. This delayed-onset muscle soreness is pri-
marily associated with eccentric-type muscle action,
during which the muscle exerts force while lengthen-
ing, as can happen when a person runs down a steep
hill or lowers a weight from a fully flexed to a fully
extended position (e.g., the two-arm curl). Delayed-
onset muscle soreness is the result of structural dam-
age to the muscle; in its most severe form, this damage
may include rupture of the cell membrane and disrup-
tion of the contractile elements of individual muscle
fibers (Armstrong, Warren, Warren 1991). Such dam-
age appears to result in an inflammatory response
(MacIntyre, Reid, McKenzie 1995).
Total inactivity results in muscle atrophy and
loss of bone mineral and mass. Persons who are
sedentary generally have less bone mass than those
who exercise, but the increases in bone mineral and
mass that result from either endurance or resistance
training are relatively small (Chesnut 1993). The
role of resistance training in increasing or maintain-
ing bone mass is not well characterized. Endurance
training has little demonstrated positive effect on
bone mineral and mass. Nonetheless, even small
increases in bone mass gained from endurance or
resistance training can help prevent or delay the
process of osteoporosis (Drinkwater 1994). (See
Chapter 4 for further information on the effects of
exercise on bone.)
The musculoskeletal system cannot function with-
out connective tissue linking bones to bones (liga-
ments) and muscles to bones (tendons). Extensive
animal studies indicate that ligaments and tendons
become stronger with prolonged and high-intensity
exercise. This effect is the result of an increase in the
strength of insertion sites between ligaments, ten-
dons, and bones, as well as an increase in the cross-
sectional areas of ligaments and tendons. These
structures also become weaker and smaller with sev-
eral weeks of immobilization (Tipton and Vailas 1990),
which can have important implications for muscu-
loskeletal performance and risk of injury.
Metabolic Adaptations
Significant metabolic adaptations occur in skeletal
muscle in response to endurance training. First, both
the size and number of mitochondria increase sub-
stantially, as does the activity of oxidative enzymes.
Myoglobin content in the muscle can also be aug-
mented, increasing the amount of oxygen stored in
individual muscle fibers (Hickson 1981), but this
effect is variable (Svedenhag, Henriksson, Sylvén
1983). Such adaptations, combined with the increase
in capillaries and muscle blood flow in the trained
muscles (noted in a previous section), greatly enhance
the oxidative capacity of the endurance-trained muscle.
Endurance training also increases the capacity of
skeletal muscle to store glycogen (Kiens et al. 1993).
The ability of trained muscles to use fat as an energy
source is also improved, and this greater reliance on
fat spares glycogen stores (Kiens et al. 1993). The
increased capacity to use fat following endurance
training results from an enhanced ability to mobilize
free-fatty acids from fat depots and an improved
capacity to oxidize fat consequent to the increase in
the muscle enzymes responsible for fat oxidation
(Wilmore and Costill 1994).
Add page number pdf - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page numbers to a pdf in preview; add remove pages from pdf
Add page number pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page numbers to a pdf file; add document to pdf pages
70
Physical Activity and Health
These changes in muscle and in cardiorespi-
ratory function are responsible for increases in
both  
˙
VO
2
max and lactate threshold. The endurance-
trained person can thus perform at considerably higher
rates of work than the untrained person. Increases in
˙
VO
2
max generally range from 15 to 20 percent follow-
ing a 6-month training period (Wilmore and Costill
1994). However, individual variations in this response
are considerable. In one study of 60- to 71-year-old
men and women who endurance trained for 9 to 12
months, the improvement in  
˙
VO
2
max varied from 0
to 43 percent; the mean increase was 24 percent
(Kohrt et al. 1991). This variation in response may
be due in part to genetic factors and to initial levels
of fitness. To illustrate the changes that can be
expected with endurance training, a hypothetical
sedentary man’s pretraining values have been com-
pared with his values after a 6-month period of
endurance training and with the values of a typical
elite endurance runner (Table 3-2).
Responses to endurance training are similar for
men and women. At all ages, women and men show
similar gains in strength from resistance training
(Rogers and Evans 1993; Holloway and Baechle 1990)
Table 3-2.
A hypothetical example of alterations in selected physiological variables consequent to a 6-month
endurance training program in a previously sedentary man compared with those of a typical elite
endurance runner
Sedentary man
Variable
Pretraining
Posttraining
Runner
Cardiovascular
HR at rest (beats•min
-1
)
71
59
36
HR max (beats•min
-1
)
185
183
174
SV rest (ml)
65
80
125
SV max (ml)
120
140
200
˙
Q rest (L•min
-1
)
4.6
4.7
4.5
˙
Q max (L•min
-1
)
22.2
25.6
32.5
Heart volume (ml)
750
820
1,200
Blood volume (L)
4.7
5.1
6.0
Systolic BP rest (mmHg)
135
130
120
Systolic BP max (mmHg)
210
205
210
Diastolic BP rest (mmHg)
78
76
65
Diastolic BP max (mmHg)
82
80
65
Respiratory
˙
V
E
rest (L•min
-1
)
7
6
6
˙
V
E
rest (L•min
-1
)
110
135
195
TV rest (L)
0.5
0.5
0.5
TV max (L)
2.75
3.0
3.9
RR rest (breaths•min
-1
)
14
12
12
RR max (breaths•min
-1
)
40
45
50
Metabolic
A-
-
vO
2
diff rest (ml•100 ml
-1
)
6.0
6.0
6.0
A-
-
vO
2
diff max (ml•100 ml
-1
)
14.5
15.0
16.0
˙
VO
2
rest (ml•kg
-1
•min
-1
)
3.5
3.5
3.5
˙
VO
2
max (ml•kg
-1
•min
-1
)
40.5
49.8
76.5
Blood lactate rest (mmol•L
-1
)
1.0
1.0
1.0
Blood lactate max (mmol•L
-1
)
7.5
8.5
9.0
Adapted from Wilmore JH, Costill DL. 
Physiology of sport and exercise
. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 1994, p. 230.
HR = heart rate; max = maximal; SV = stroke volume;  
˙
Q = cardiac output; BP = blood pressure; 
˙
V
E
= ventilatory volume; TV = tidal volume;
RR = respiration rate; A-
-
vO
2
diff = arterial-mixed venous oxygen difference; 
˙
VO
2
= oxygen consumption.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
pageIndex, The page index of the PDF page that will be 0
add page to pdf acrobat; add page numbers to pdf online
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
If your page number is set as 1, then the two output PDF files will contains the first page and the later three pages Add necessary references:
adding a page to a pdf; add page numbers pdf files
71
Physiologic Responses and Long-Term Adaptations to Exercise
and similar gains in  
˙
VO
2
max from aerobic endurance
training (Kohrt et al. 1991; Mitchell et al. 1992).
Cardiovascular and Respiratory Adaptations
Endurance training leads to significant cardiovascu-
lar and respiratory changes at rest and during steady-
state exercise at both submaximal and maximal rates
of work. The magnitude of these adaptations largely
depends on the person’s initial fitness level; on mode,
intensity, duration, and frequency of exercise; and
on the length of training (e.g., weeks, months, years).
Long-Term Cardiovascular Adaptations
Cardiac output at rest and during submaximal exer-
cise is essentially unchanged following an endur-
ance training program. At or near maximal rates of
work, however, cardiac output is increased sub-
stantially, up to 30 percent or more (Saltin and
Rowell 1980). There are important differences in
the responses of stroke volume and heart rate to
training. After training, stroke volume is increased
at rest, during submaximal exercise, and during
maximal exercise; conversely, posttraining heart
rate is decreased at rest and during submaximal
exercise and is usually unchanged at maximal rates
of work. The increase in stroke volume appears to
be the dominant change and explains most of the
changes observed in cardiac output.
Several factors contribute to the increase in
stroke volume from endurance training. Endurance
training increases plasma volume by approximately
the same percentage that it increases stroke volume
(Green, Jones, Painter 1990). An increased plasma
volume increases the volume of blood available to
return to the right heart and, subsequently, to the
left ventricle. There is also an increase in the end-
diastolic volume (the volume of blood in the heart
at the end of the diastolic filling period) because of
increased amount of blood and increased return of
blood to the ventricle during exercise (Seals et al.
1994). This acute increase in the left ventricle’s
end-diastolic volume stretches its walls, resulting
in a more elastic recoil.
Endurance training also results in long-term
changes in the structure of the heart that augment
stroke volume. Short-term adaptive responses in-
clude ventricular dilatation; this increase in the vol-
ume of the ventricles allows end-diastolic volume to
increase without excessive stress on the ventricular
walls. Long-term adaptive responses include hyper-
trophy of the cardiac muscle fibers (i.e., increases in
the size of each fiber). This hypertrophy increases
the muscle mass of the ventricles, permitting greater
force to be exerted with each beat of the heart.
Increases in the thickness of the posterior and septal
walls of the left ventricle can lead to a more forceful
contraction of the left ventricle, thus emptying more
of the blood from the left ventricle (George, Wolfe,
Burggraf 1991).
Endurance training increases the number of cap-
illaries in trained skeletal muscle, thereby allowing a
greater capacity for blood flow in the active muscle
(Terjung 1995). This enhanced capacity for blood
flow is associated with a reduction in total peripheral
resistance; thus, the left ventricle can exert a more
forceful contraction against a lower resistance to
flow out of the ventricle (Blomqvist and Saltin 1983).
Arterial blood pressure at rest, blood pressure
during submaximal exercise, and peak blood pres-
sure all show a slight decline as a result of endurance
training in normotensive individuals (Fagard and
Tipton 1994). However, decreases are greater in
persons with high blood pressure. After endurance
training, resting blood pressure (systolic/diastolic)
will decrease on average -3/-3 mmHg in persons with
normal blood pressure; in borderline hypertensive
persons, the decrease will be -6/-7 mmHg; and in
hypertensive persons, the decrease will be -10/-8
mmHg (Fagard and Tipton 1994). (See Chapter 4 for
further information.)
Respiratory Adaptations
The major changes in the respiratory system from en-
durance training are an increase in the maximal rate of
pulmonary ventilation, which is the result of increases
in both tidal volume and respiration rate, and an
increase in pulmonary diffusion at maximal rates of
work, primarily due to increases in pulmonary blood
flow, particularly to the upper regions of the lung.
Maintenance, Detraining, and
Prolonged Inactivity
Most adaptations that result from both endurance
and resistance training will be reversed if a person
stops or reduces training. The greatest deterioration
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages Add necessary references
add pages to an existing pdf; add a page to a pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Add necessary references: Description: Search specified string from all the PDF pages. eg: The first page is 0. 0
adding page numbers to pdf files; add page to a pdf
72
Physical Activity and Health
in physiologic function occurs during prolonged bed
rest and immobilization by casts. A basic mainte-
nance training program is necessary to prevent these
losses in function.
Maintaining Fitness and Muscular Strength
Muscle strength and cardiorespiratory capacity are
dependent on separate aspects of exercise. After a per-
son has obtained gains in 
˙
VO
2
max by performing
cardiorespiratory exercise six times per week, two
to four times per week is the optimal frequency of
training to maintain those gains (Hickson and
Rosenkoetter 1981). Further, a substantial part of
the gain can be retained when the duration of each
session is reduced by as much as two-thirds, but
only if the intensity during these abbreviated ses-
sions is maintained at ‡70 percent of
˙
VO
2
max
(Hickson et al. 1985). If training intensity is reduced
by as little as one-third, however, a substantial
reduction in 
˙
VO
2
max can be expected over the next
15 weeks (Hickson et al. 1985).
In previously untrained persons, gains in mus-
cular strength can be sustained by as little as a single
session per week of resistance training, but only if
the intensity is not reduced (Graves et al. 1988).
Detraining
With complete cessation of exercise training, a sig-
nificant reduction in 
˙
VO
2
max and a decrease in
plasma volume occur within 2 weeks; all prior func-
tional gains are dissipated within 2 to 8 months, even
if routine low- to moderate-intensity physical activ-
ity has taken the place of training (Shephard 1994).
Muscular strength and power are reduced at a much
slower rate than 
˙
VO
2
max, particularly during the
first few months after an athlete discontinues resis-
tance training (Fleck and Kraemer 1987). In fact, no
decrement in either strength or power may occur for
the first 4 to 6 weeks after training ends (Neufer et al.
1987). After 12 months, almost half of the strength
gained might still be retained if the athlete remains
moderately active (Wilmore and Costill 1994).
Prolonged Inactivity
The effects of prolonged inactivity have been studied
by placing healthy young male athletes and sedentary
volunteers in bed for up to 3 weeks after a control
period during which baseline measurements were
made. The resulting detrimental changes in physi-
ologic function and performance are similar to those
resulting from reduced gravitational forces during
space flight and are more dramatic than those result-
ing from detraining studies in which routine daily
activities in the upright position (e.g., walking, stair
climbing, lifting, and carrying) are not restricted.
Results of bed rest studies show numerous physi-
ologic changes, such as profound decrements in
cardiorespiratory function proportional to the dura-
tion of bed rest (Shephard 1994; Saltin et al. 1968).
Metabolic disturbances evident within a few days of
bed rest include reversible glucose intolerance and
hyperinsulinemia in response to a standard glucose
load, reflecting cell insulin resistance (Lipman et al.
1972); reduced total energy expenditure; negative
nitrogen balance, reflecting loss of muscle protein;
and negative calcium balance, reflecting loss of bone
mass (Bloomfield and Coyle 1993). There is also a
substantial decrease in plasma volume, which affects
aerobic power.
From one study, a decline in  
˙
VO
2
max of 15 per-
cent was evident within 10 days of bed rest and
progressed to 27 percent in 3 weeks; the rate of loss was
approximately 0.8 percent per day of bed rest
(Bloomfield and Coyle 1993). The decrement in  
˙
VO
2
max
from bed rest and reduced activity results from a
decrease in maximal cardiac output, consequent to a
reduced stroke volume. This, in turn, reflects the
decrease in end-diastolic volume resulting from a
reduction in total blood and plasma volume, and
probably also from a decrease in myocardial contrac-
tility (Bloomfield and Coyle 1993). Maximal heart
rate and A-
-
vO
2
difference remain unchanged
(Bloomfield and Coyle 1993). Resting heart rate
remains essentially unchanged or is slightly in-
creased, whereas resting stroke volume and cardiac
output remain unchanged or are slightly decreased.
However, the heart rate for submaximal exertion is
generally increased to compensate for the sizable
reduction in stroke volume.
Physical inactivity associated with bed rest or
prolonged weightlessness also results in a progres-
sive decrement in skeletal muscle mass (disuse
atrophy) and strength, as well as an associated
reduction in bone mineral density that is approxi-
mately proportional to the duration of immobiliza-
tion or weightlessness (Bloomfield and Coyle 1993).
The loss of muscle mass is not as great as that which
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. matchString, The string wil be deleted from PDF file, -. 0
add pages to pdf document; add page numbers pdf
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
200F); annot.EndPoint = new PointF(300F, 400F); // add annotation to The string wil be highlighted from PDF file, 0
add pages to pdf without acrobat; adding page numbers in pdf
73
Physiologic Responses and Long-Term Adaptations to Exercise
occurs with immobilization of a limb by a plaster
cast, but it exceeds that associated with cessation of
resistance exercise training. The muscle groups
most affected by prolonged immobilization are the
antigravity postural muscles of the lower extremi-
ties (Bloomfield and Coyle 1993). The loss of nor-
mal mechanical strain patterns from contraction of
these muscles results in a corresponding loss of
density in the bones of the lower extremity, particu-
larly the heel and the spine (Bloomfield and Coyle
1993). Muscles atrophy faster than bones lose their
density. For example, 1 month of bed rest by healthy
young men resulted in a 10 to 20 percent decrease
in muscle fiber cross-sectional area and a 21 percent
reduction in peak isokinetic torque of knee exten-
sors (Bloomfield and Coyle 1993), whereas a simi-
lar period of bed rest resulted in a reduction in bone
mineral density of only 0.3 to 3 percent for the
lumbar spine and 1.5 percent for the heel.
Quantitative histologic examination of muscle
biopsies of the vastus lateralis of the leg following
immobilization shows reduced cross-sectional area
for both slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibers, actual
necrotic changes in affected fibers, loss of capillary
density, and a decline in aerobic enzyme activity,
creatinine phosphate, and glycogen stores (Bloomfield
and Coyle 1993). On resuming normal activity,
reversibility of these decrements in cardiorespiratory,
metabolic, and muscle function is fairly rapid (within
days to weeks) (Bloomfield and Coyle 1993). By
contrast, the reversal of the decrement of bone min-
eral density requires weeks to months.
Special Considerations
The physiologic responses to exercise and physi-
ologic adaptations to training and detraining, re-
viewed in the preceding sections, can be influenced
by a number of factors, including physical disability,
environmental conditions, age, and sex.
Disability
Although there is a paucity of information about
physiologic responses to exercise among persons
with disabilities, existing information supports the
notion that the capacity of these persons to adapt to
increased levels of physical activity is similar to that
of persons without disabilities. Many of the acute
effects of physical activity on the cardiovascular,
respiratory, endocrine, and musculoskeletal systems
have been demonstrated to be similar among persons
with disabilities, depending on the specific nature of
the disability. For example, physiologic responses to
exercise have been studied among persons with
paraplegia (Davis 1993), quadriplegia (Figoni 1993),
mental retardation (Fernhall 1993), multiple sclero-
sis (Ponichtera-Mulcare 1993), and postpolio syn-
drome (Birk 1993).
Environmental Conditions
The basic physiologic responses to an episode of
exercise vary considerably with changes in environ-
mental conditions. As environmental temperature
and humidity increase, the body is challenged to
maintain its core temperature. Generally, as the
body’s core temperature increases during exercise,
blood vessels in the skin begin to dilate, diverting
more blood to the body’s surface, where body heat
can be passed on to the environment (unless envi-
ronmental temperature exceeds body temperature).
Evaporation of water from the skin’s surface signifi-
cantly aids in heat loss; however, as humidity in-
creases, evaporation becomes limited.
These methods for cooling can compromise car-
diovascular function during exercise. Increasing
blood flow to the skin creates competition with the
active muscles for a large percentage of the cardiac
output. When a person is exercising for prolonged
periods in the heat, stroke volume will generally
decline over time consequent to dehydration and
increased blood flow in the skin (Rowell 1993;
Montain and Coyle 1992). Heart rate increases sub-
stantially to try to maintain cardiac output to com-
pensate for the reduced stroke volume.
High air temperature is not the only factor that
stresses the body’s ability to cool itself in the heat.
High humidity, low air velocity, and the radiant heat
from the sun and reflective surfaces also contribute
to the total effect. For example, exercising under
conditions of 32
˚
C (90
˚
F) air temperature, 20 per-
cent relative humidity, 3.0 kilometers per hour (4.8
miles per hour) air velocity, and cloud cover is much
more comfortable and less stressful to the body than
the same exercise under conditions of 24
˚
C (75
˚
F)
air temperature, 90 percent relative humidity, no air
movement, and direct exposure to the sun.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with Other SDKs. Please note that, PDF page number starts from 0.
adding page numbers pdf; add page to pdf online
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. 0
add pages to pdf acrobat; adding page numbers in pdf file
74
Physical Activity and Health
Children respond differently to heat than adults
do. Children have a higher body surface area to body
mass ratio (surface area/mass), which facilitates heat
loss when environmental temperatures are below
skin temperature. When environmental tempera-
ture exceeds skin temperature, children are at an
even greater disadvantage because these mecha-
nisms then become avenues of heat gain. Children
also have a lower rate of sweat production; even
though they have more heat-activated sweat glands,
each gland produces considerably less sweat than
that of an adult (Bar-Or 1983).
The inability to maintain core temperature can
lead to heat-related injuries. Heat cramps, character-
ized by severe cramping of the active skeletal muscles,
is the least severe of three primary heat disorders.
Heat exhaustion results when the demand for blood
exceeds what is available, leading to competition for
the body’s limited blood supply. Heat exhaustion is
accompanied by symptoms including extreme fa-
tigue, breathlessness, dizziness, vomiting, fainting,
cold and clammy or hot and dry skin, hypotension,
and a weak, rapid pulse (Wilmore and Costill 1994).
Heatstroke, the most extreme of the three heat disor-
ders, is characterized by a core temperature of 40
˚
C
(104
˚
F) or higher, cessation of sweating, hot and dry
skin, rapid pulse and respiration, hypertension, and
confusion or unconsciousness. If left untreated, heat-
stroke can lead to coma, then death. People experi-
encing symptoms of heat-related injury should be
taken to a shady area, cooled with by whatever means
available, and if conscious given nonalcoholic bever-
ages to drink. Medical assistance should be sought.
To reduce the risk of developing heat disorders, a
person should drink enough fluid to try to match
that which is lost through sweating, avoid extreme
heat, and reduce the intensity of activity in hot
weather. Because children are less resistant to the
adverse effects of heat during exercise, special atten-
tion should be given to protect them when they
exercise in the heat and to provide them with extra
fluids to drink.
Stresses associated with exercising in the ex-
treme cold are generally less severe. For most situa-
tions, the problems associated with cold stress can be
eliminated by adequate clothing. Still, cold stress can
induce a number of changes in the physiologic re-
sponse to exercise (Doubt 1991; Jacobs, Martineau,
Vallerand 1994; Shephard 1993). These include the
increased generation of body heat by vigorous activ-
ity and shivering, increased production of catechola-
mines, vasoconstriction in both the cutaneous and
nonactive skeletal muscle beds to provide insulation
for the body’s core, increased lactate production, and
a higher oxygen uptake for the same work (Doubt
1991). For the same absolute temperature, exposure
to cold water is substantially more stressful than
exposure to cold air because the heat transfer in
water is about 25 times greater than in air (Toner and
McArdle 1988). Because the ratio of surface area to
mass is higher in children than in adults, children
lose heat at a faster rate when exposed to the same
cold stress. The elderly tend to have a reduced
response of generating body heat and are thus more
susceptible to cold stress.
Altitude also affects the body’s physiologic re-
sponses to exercise. As altitude increases, barometric
pressure decreases, and the partial pressure of inhaled
oxygen is decreased proportionally. A decreased par-
tial pressure of oxygen reduces the driving force to
unload oxygen from the air to the blood and from the
blood to the muscle, thereby compromising oxygen
delivery (Fulco and Cymerman 1988). 
˙
VO
2
max is
significantly reduced at altitudes greater than 1,500
meters. This effect impairs the performance of endur-
ance activities. The body makes both short-term and
long-term adaptations to altitude exposure that en-
able it to at least partially adapt to this imposed stress.
Because oxygen delivery is the primary concern, the
initial adaptation that occurs within the first 24 hours
of exposure to altitude is an increased cardiac output
both at rest and during submaximal exercise. Ventila-
tory volumes are also increased. An ensuing reduction
in plasma volume increases the concentration of red
blood cells (hemoconcentration), thus providing more
oxygen molecules per unit of blood (Grover, Weil,
Reeves 1986). Over several weeks, the red blood cell
mass is increased through stimulation of the bone
marrow by the hormone erythropoietin.
Exercising vigorously outdoors when air qual-
ity is poor can also produce adverse physiologic
responses. In addition to decreased tolerance for
exercise, direct respiratory effects include increased
airway reactivity and potential exposure to harmful
vapors and airborne dusts, toxins, and pollens
(Wilmore and Costill 1994).
75
Physiologic Responses and Long-Term Adaptations to Exercise
Effects of Age
When absolute values are scaled to account for
differences in body size, most differences in physi-
ologic function between children and adults dis-
appear. The exceptions are notable. For the same
absolute rate of work on a cycle ergometer, chil-
dren will have approximately the same metabolic
cost, or 
˙
VO
2
demands, but they meet those demands
differently. Because children have smaller hearts,
their stroke volume is lower than that for adults for
the same rate of work. Heart rate is increased to
compensate for the lower stroke volume; but be-
cause this increase is generally inadequate, cardiac
output is slightly lower (Bar-Or 1983). The A-
-
vO
2
difference is therefore increased to compensate for
the lower cardiac output to achieve the same
˙
VO
2
.
The
˙
VO
2
max, expressed in liters per minute, in-
creases during the ages of 6–18 years for boys and
6–14 years for girls (Figure 3-4) before it reaches a
plateau (Krahenbuhl, Skinner, Kohrt 1985). When
expressed relative to body weight (milliliters per
kilogram per minute), 
˙
VO
2
max remains fairly stable
for boys from 6–18 years of age but decreases
steadily for girls during those years (Figure 3-4)
(Krahenbuhl, Skinner, Kohrt 1985). Most likely,
different patterns of physical activity contribute to
this variation because the difference in aerobic
capacity between elite female endurance athletes
and elite male endurance athletes is substantially
less than the difference between boys and girls in
general (e.g., 10 percent vs. 25 percent) (Wilmore
and Costill 1994).
The deterioration of physiologic function with
aging is almost identical to the change in function
that generally accompanies inactivity. Maximal heart
rate and maximal stroke volume are decreased in
older adults; maximal cardiac output is thus de-
creased, which results in a  
˙
VO
2
max lower than that
of a young adult (Raven and Mitchell 1980). The
decline in 
˙
VO
2
max approximates 0.40 to 0.50 milli-
liters per kilogram per minute per year in men,
according to data from cross-sectional studies; this
rate of decline is less in women (Buskirk and
Hodgson 1987). Through training, both older men
and women can increase their 
˙
VO
2
max values by
approximately the same percentage as those seen
Data were taken from Krahenbuhl GS, Skinner JS, Kohrt WM  1985 and Bar-Or O 1983.
*
Values are expressed in both liters per minute and
relative to body weight (milliliters per kilogram per minute).
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
Maximal oxygen uptake (liters/min)
Maximal oxygen uptake (ml/kg/min)
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Boys, L/min
Boys, ml/kg
Girls, ml/kg
Girls, L/min
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Age (years)
13
14
15
16
17
18
Figure 3-4.  Changes in VO
max with increasing age from 6 to 18 years of age in boys and girls*
.
.
76
Physical Activity and Health
in younger adults (Kohrt et al. 1991). The inter-
relationships of age, 
˙
VO
2
max, and training status
are evident when the loss in
˙
VO
2
max with age is
compared for active and sedentary individuals
(Figure 3-5).
When the cardiorespiratory responses of an older
adult are compared with those of a young or middle-
aged adult at the same absolute submaximal rate of
work, stroke volume for an older person is generally
lower and heart rate is higher from the attempt to
maintain cardiac output. Because this attempt is
generally insufficient, the A-
-
vO
2
difference must
increase to provide the same submaximal oxygen
uptake (Raven and Mitchell 1980; Thompson and
Dorsey 1986). Some researchers have shown, how-
ever, that cardiac output can be maintained at both
submaximal and maximal rates of work through a
higher stroke volume in older adults (Rodeheffer et
al. 1984).
The deterioration in physiological function nor-
mally associated with aging is, in fact, caused by a
combination of reduced physical activity and the
aging process itself. By maintaining an active
lifestyle, or by increasing levels of physical activ-
ity if previously sedentary, older persons can
maintain relatively high levels of cardiovascular
and metabolic function, including 
˙
VO
2
max (Kohrt
et al. 1991), and of skeletal muscle function (Rogers
and Evans 1993). For example, Fiatarone and col-
leagues (1994) found an increase of 113 percent in
the strength of elderly men and women (mean age of
87.1 years) following a 10-week training program of
progressive resistance exercise. Cross-sectional thigh
muscle area was increased, as was stair-climbing
power, gait velocity, and level of spontaneous activ-
ity. Increasing endurance and strength in the elderly
contributes to their ability to live independently.
Differences by Sex
For the most part, women and men who participate
in exercise training have similar responses in car-
diovascular, respiratory, and metabolic function
(providing that size and activity level are normal-
ized). Relative increases in 
˙
VO
2
max are equivalent
Figure 3-5.   Changes in VO
max with aging, comparing an active population and sedentary population (the 
figure also illustrates the expected increase in VO
max when a previously sedentary person begins 
an exercise program) 
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
20
30
40
50
Age (years)
60
70
80
-VO2 
Active adults 
Reduction in activity
plus “aging”
Sedentary adults
Expected increase in VO
max
resulting from an exercise intervention
Reduction in 
activity plus 
weight gain
.
.
.
.
Adapted, by permission, from Buskirk ER, Hodgson JL. 
Federation Proceedings
1987.
.
77
Physiologic Responses and Long-Term Adaptations to Exercise
for women and men (Kohrt et al. 1991; Mitchell et
al. 1992). Some evidence suggests that older women
accomplish this increase in  
˙
VO
2
max mainly through
an increase in the A-
-
vO
2
difference, whereas younger
women and men have substantial increases in stroke
volume, which increases maximal cardiac output
(Spina et al. 1993). With resistance training, women
experience equivalent increases in strength (Rogers
and Evans 1993; Holloway and Baechle 1990),
although they gain less fat-free mass due to less
muscle hypertrophy.
Several sex differences have been noted in the
acute response to exercise. At the same absolute
rate of exercise, women have a higher heart rate
response than men, primarily because of a lower
stroke volume. This lower stroke volume is a func-
tion of smaller heart size and smaller blood volume.
In addition, women have less potential to increase
the A-
-
vO
2
difference because of lower hemoglobin
content. Those differences, in addition to greater
fat mass, result in a lower  
˙
VO
2
max in women, even
when normalized for size and level of training
(Lewis, Kamon, Hodgson 1986).
Conclusions
1. Physical activity has numerous beneficial physi-
ologic effects. Most widely appreciated are its
effects on the cardiovascular and musculo-
skeletal systems, but benefits on the functioning
of metabolic, endocrine, and immune systems
are also considerable.
2. Many of the beneficial effects of exercise train-
ing—from both endurance and resistance ac-
tivities—diminish within 2 weeks if physical
activity is substantially reduced, and effects
disappear within 2 to 8 months if physical
activity is not resumed.
3.People of all ages, both male and female, undergo
beneficial physiologic adaptations to physical
activity.
Research Needs
1. Explore individual variations in response to
exercise.
2. Better characterize mechanisms through which
the musculoskeletal system responds differen-
tially to endurance and resistance exercise.
3. Better characterize the mechanisms by which
physical activity reduces the risk of cardiovascular
disease, hypertension, and non–insulin-
dependent diabetes mellitus.
4. Determine the minimal and optimal amount of
exercise for disease prevention.
5. Better characterize beneficial activity profiles for
people with disabilities.
References
Abernethy PJ, Thayer R, Taylor AW. Acute and chronic
responses of skeletal muscle to endurance and sprint
exercise: a review. Sports Medicine 1990;10:365–389.
American College of Sports Medicine. Position stand:
physical activity, physical fitness, and hypertension.
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 1993;25:i–x.
Armstrong RB, Warren GL, Warren JA. Mechanisms of
exercise-induced muscle fibre injury. Sports Medicine
1991;12:184–207.
Bar-Or O. Pediatric sports medicine for the practitioner:
from physiologic principles to clinical applications. New
York: Springer-Verlag, 1983.
Birk TJ. Poliomyelitis and the post-polio syndrome: exer-
cise capacities and adaptations—current research, fu-
ture directions, and widespread applicability. Medicine
and Science in Sports and Exercise 1993;25:466–472.
Blomqvist CG, Saltin B. Cardiovascular adaptations to
physical training. Annual Review of Physiology
1983;45:169–189.
Bloomfield SA, Coyle EF. Bed rest, detraining, and reten-
tion of training-induced adaptation. In: Durstine JL,
King AC, Painter PL, Roitman JL, Zwiren LD, editors.
ACSM’s resource manual for guidelines for exercise test-
ing and prescription. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: Lea and
Febiger, 1993:115–128.
Buskirk ER, Hodgson JL. Age and aerobic power: the rate
of change in men and women. Federation Proceedings
1987;46:1824–1829.
Chesnut CH III. Bone mass and exercise. American Journal
of Medicine 1993;95(5A Suppl):34S–36S.
78
Physical Activity and Health
Coyle EF. Cardiovascular function during exercise: neural
control factors. Sports Science Exchange 1991;4:1–6.
Davis GM. Exercise capacity of individuals with para-
plegia. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
1993;25:423–432.
Doubt TJ. Physiology of exercise in the cold. Sports
Medicine 1991;11:367–381.
Drinkwater BL. Physical activity, fitness, and osteoporosis.
In: Bouchard C, Shephard RJ, Stephens T, editors.
Physical activity, fitness, and health: international proceed-
ings and consensus statement. Champaign, IL: Human
Kinetics, 1994:724–736.
Fagard RH, Tipton CM. Physical activity, fitness, and
hypertension. In: Bouchard C, Shephard RJ, Stephens T,
editors. Physical activity, fitness, and health: international
proceedings and consensus statement. Champaign, IL:
Human Kinetics, 1994:633–655.
Farrell PA, Wilmore JH, Coyle EF, Billing JE, Costill DL.
Plasma lactate accumulation and distance running
performance. Medicine and Science in Sports 1979;11:
338–344.
Fernhall B. Physical fitness and exercise training of indi-
viduals with mental retardation. Medicine and Science
in Sports and Exercise 1993;25:442–450.
Fiatarone MA, O’Neill EF, Ryan ND, Clements KM, Solares
GR, Nelson ME, et al. Exercise training and nutritional
supplementation for physical frailty in very elderly
people. New England Journal of Medicine 1994;
330:1769–1775.
Figoni SF. Exercise responses and quadriplegia. Medicine
and Science in Sports and Exercise 1993;25:433–441.
Fleck SJ, Kraemer WJ. Designing resistance training pro-
grams. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 1987:264.
Fulco CS, Cymerman A. Human performance and acute
hypoxia. In: Pandolf KB, Sawka MN, Gonzalez RR,
editors. Human performance physiology and environ-
mental medicine at terrestrial extremes. Indianapolis:
Benchmark Press, 1988:467–495.
George KP, Wolfe LA, Burggraf GW. The “athletic heart
syndrome”: a critical review. Sports Medicine
1991;11:300–331.
Gledhill N, Cox D, Jamnik R. Endurance athletes’ stroke
volume does not plateau: major advantage is diastolic
function. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
1994;26:1116–1121.
Gonyea WJ, Sale DG, Gonyea FB, Mikesky A. Exercise-
induced increases in muscle fiber number. European
Journal of Applied Physiology 1986;55:137–141.
Gordon NF, Kohl HW III, Pollock ML, Vaandrager
H, Gibbons LW, Blair SN. Cardiovascular safety of
maximal strength testing in healthy adults. American
Journal of Cardiology 1995;76:851–853.
Graves JE, Pollock ML, Leggett SH, Braith RW, Carpenter
DM, Bishop LE. Effect of reduced training frequency
on muscular strength. International Journal of Sports
Medicine 1988;9:316–319.
Green HJ, Jones LL, Painter DC. Effects of short-term
training on cardiac function during prolonged exer-
cise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
1990;22:488–493.
Grover RF, Weil JV, Reeves JT. Cardiovascular adaptation
to exercise at high altitude. Exercise and Sport Sciences
Reviews 1986;14:269–302.
Hickson RC. Skeletal muscle cytochrome c and myoglo-
bin, endurance, and frequency of training. Journal of
Applied Physiology 1981;51:746–749.
Hickson RC, Foster C, Pollock ML, Galassi TM, Rich S.
Reduced training intensities and loss of aerobic power,
endurance, and cardiac growth. Journal of Applied
Physiology 1985;58:492–499.
Hickson RC, Rosenkoetter MA. Reduced training fre-
quencies and maintenance of increased aerobic power.
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 1981;13:
13–16.
Hoffman-Goetz L, Pedersen BK. Exercise and the immune
system: a model of the stress response? Immunology
Today 1994;15:382–387.
Holloway JB, Baechle TR. Strength training for female
athletes: a review of selected aspects. Sports Medicine
1990;9:216–228.
Isea JE, Piepoli M, Adamopoulos S, Pannarale G, Sleight
P, Coats AJS. Time course of haemodynamic changes
after maximal exercise. European Journal of Clinical
Investigation 1994;24:824–829.
Jacobs I, Martineau L, Vallerand AL. Thermoregulatory
thermogenesis in humans during cold stress. Exercise
and Sport Sciences Reviews 1994;22:221–250.
Jolesz F, Sreter FA. Development, innervation, and activity–
pattern induced changes in skeletal muscle. Annual
Review of Physiology 1981;43:531–552.
Jorgensen CR, Gobel FL, Taylor HL, Wang Y. Myocardial
blood flow and oxygen consumption during exercise.
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1977;301:
213–223.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested