c# code to view pdf file : Add page to pdf reader software control project winforms azure .net UWP psa2-part237

19
practice however, a major safety review is normally performed periodically,
e.g. every 10 years.
A major benefit of including PSA in periodic reviews is the creation of an up-
to-date overview of the whole plant. If an older plant cannot be shown to
totally comply with current safety standards, PSA results can sometimes be
used to help justify continued operation. The PSA review may well lead to the
identification of real cost-effective improvements to safety. Frequently, the
incorporation of data resulting from operating experience into the PSA to
replace conservative design assumptions will lead to a relaxation of operating
constraints, while still maintaining adequate safety margins.
8.2.4
Severe Accident Management and Emergency Planning
While the emergency operating procedures direct operation of the plant in
controlling the progression of an accident, the realm of severe accident
management is entered where any other possible means, internal or external,
of mitigating the accident and its consequences may be utilized. PSA is a
good source available to identify accident sequences, to categorize them into
functional groups, and to provide descriptions of plant responses and
vulnerabilities. PSA can support the development of strategies to deal with
the identified vulnerabilities and of calculational aids that would be used to
assist in the selection and application of the strategies.
8.2.5
Risk-informed Inspections
The main objective of the regulatory inspection is to ensure continued
operation of NPPs while maintaining the adequate safety. These inspections
are carried out with different objectives. For example, an inspection can be
carried out for resolution of generic safety issues assuring adequate safety
improvements. The special inspection can be carried out when declining
performance of NPP is noted. An inspection can be carried out in response to
operational events when deemed necessary.
The PSA can be a useful tool in ‘risk-informed’ regulatory inspections. The
objective of the risk-informed inspection is not to replace the traditional
inspection process but to enhance/balance the existing inspection process.
The risk-informed approach improves the effectiveness and efficiency of the
inspections by focusing the resources on the risk-significant aspects. The
PSA insights are useful in identifying the important risk contributors (i.e.
components as well as important human actions). This information is used to
identify the inspectable areas in base-line inspections. The PSA can also be
used to find out the risk impact of the inspection findings/operational events.
This is known as ‘significant determination process’. Depending upon the
level of significance, other inspections such as special inspection, generic
safety inspection and event response can be supplemented.
Add page to pdf reader - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add and remove pages from a pdf; add and remove pages from pdf file online
Add page to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page number pdf; add contents page to pdf
20
9.  ROLE OF PSA IN THE REGULATORY
DECISION MAKING
Traditionally, NPPs have been designed, constructed and operated mainly
based on deterministic safety analysis philosophy. In this approach, a specific
set of postulated initiating events are analyesed and their consequences are
evaluated to establish design and operational requirements. To account for
the uncertainty, a substantial amount of safety margin is incorporated. In spite
of all these considerations, experience has shown that there are certain
accidents, which fall outside the domain of traditional design basis accident
(i.e. multiple failures at TMI-2 and fire incident (external event) at Browns
Ferry). Hence, to cover such scenarios a more integrated approach is required.
The PSA provides a methodical approach in identifying accident sequences
that can result from a broad range of initiating events. It includes the systematic
determination of accident frequencies and consequences, and aims as much
as possible to be ‘best-estimate’. However, since the PSA model attempts to
simulate reality, it is inevitable that there will be simplifying assumptions and
idealisations of rather complex processes, phenomena and variability in the
data. These simplifications and idealisations will generate uncertainties, which
limit the usefulness of PSA.
For best utilization of the advantages of both these approaches, an integrated
approach should be used for decision making. In view of this, many regulatory
bodies desire to move towards an approach in which PSA insights are used as
one of the inputs along with other inputs such as the degree to which any
mandatory requirements are met, the insights from the deterministic analysis,
the results of the cost-benefit analysis etc. This is known as ‘risk informed
decision making’ (RIDM).
If the results of the PSA are to be used in RIDM, it will be necessary to
formulate some form of acceptance criteria (i.e. quantitative goals). The
quantitative goals should be developed under the leadership of the regulatory
body through a process of consultation between the regulatory body and the
licensees/utilities. Maximum use should be made of experience available within
the industry, knowledgeable experts, national and international expert bodies.
In order to be useful as a regulatory tool, PSA models will have to meet certain
requirements. The scope of the PSA, in terms of the coverage of the contributors
to risk must be sufficient for the proposed applications. To the extent possible,
plant specific PSAs based on state of the art, ‘best-estimate’ models,
assumptions and data should be used. PSA model should be developed to a
level of detail such that dependencies and failure modes applicable to the
decision are adequately modelled.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in C#.NET class application?
adding a page to a pdf in preview; add page number to pdf print
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Have a try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file. ' Open a document.
add document to pdf pages; add page number to pdf preview
21
10.  ISSUES FOR ADVANCEMENT OF PSA
PSA methodology has been under continuous improvement since its origin.
The state-of-the-art has now matured for at least Level 1 PSA with internal
events. Still there are certain areas in which world wide consensus have not
been arrived at. There are large variabilities in the fault tree and event tree
modeling. Not much work has been reported regarding the validation aspects
of PSA methodology. Some PSA standards have been developed and basic
elements of PSA are standardized. However, some modeling issues are not
fully addressed yet. The important issues are as mentioned below:
·
Validation of PSA
·
Development of probabilistic safety criteria
·
Assessment and incorporation of safety culture in PSA
·
Use of human reliability analysis in PSA
·
CCFs across the safety systems
·
Modeling of shared systems
·
Modeling of computer based systems
·
Integration of passive systems in PSA
·
Incorporation of ageing effects in PSA
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#;
add pages to pdf in preview; add pages to pdf file
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via password by using simple VB.NET demo code. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF.
add page break to pdf; adding page numbers to a pdf document
22
FIG.  A1 :  WATER  SUPPLY  SYSTEM
APPENDIX-A
GENERAL  METHODOLOGY  FOR   LEVEL  1 PSA
A1.1
Fault Tree Analysis
A fault tree (FT) analysis can be described as an analytical technique, whereby
an undesired state of the system is specified, and the system is then analysed
in the context of its environment and operation to find all credible ways in
which the undesired event may occur. The FT is a graphical model of the
various parallel and sequential combinations of fault that will result in the
occurrence of the predefined undesired event. The fault can be component
hardware failures, human errors, or any other pertinent events, which can lead
to the undesired event. A fault tree thus depicts the logical interrelationships
of basic events that lead to the undesired event.
It is important to understand that a FT is not a model of all possible system
failures or all possible causes for system failure. It is tailored to its top event,
which corresponds to some particular system failure mode, and the FT thus
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings. On this page, we will talk about how to achieve this via Add necessary references
add page to pdf in preview; adding page numbers to pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add pdf pages to word; add pages to pdf without acrobat
AND Gate
OR Gate
Transfer Gate
23
includes only those faults that contribute to this top event. Moreover, these
faults are not exhaustive.  They cover only the most credible faults as assessed
by the analysts.
In constructing a fault tree, the basic concepts of failure effects, failure modes
and failure mechanisms are important in determining the proper
interrelationships among the events. The failure mechanisms produce failure
modes, which, in turn, have certain effects on system operation. To illustrate
these concepts consider a simple system that supply the water from a sump to
a tank-A. The system consists of a sump, two pumps, one check valve, two
motorized valves, tank-A and associated piping. This is shown in Fig. A1.
A1.2
Fault Tree Gates and Symbols
Before the fault tree is constructed, let us first understand the basic fault tree
gates and symbols used in the fault tree models.
TABLE-1 : BASIC FAULT TREE GATES AND SYMBOLS
The AND gate is used to indicate that the
output occurs if and only if all the input
events occur. The input events can be basic
events, intermediate events (outputs of other
gates), or a combination of both. There
should be at least two input events to an
AND gate.
Summary of logic : All events must be TRUE
for the output to be TRUE.
The OR gate is used to indicate that the
output occurs if and only if at least one of
the input events occur. The input events can
be basic events, intermediate events, or a
combination of both. There should be at least
two inputs to an OR gate.
Summary of logic : If at least 1 event is TRUE,
the output is TRUE.
A transfer gate is a symbol used to link logic
in separate areas of a fault tree. There are
two primary uses of transfer gates. First, an
entire fault tree may not fit on a single sheet
of paper or you may want to keep the
individual trees small to view and organize
them. Second, the same fault tree logic may
be used in different places in a fault tree.
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET Project DLLs for Deleting PDF Document Page. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add page numbers to pdf in reader; add multi page pdf to word document
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET Tutorial for How to Add a Sticky Note Annotation to PDF Page with Visual enable users to annotate PDF without adobe PDF reader control installed.
add pages to pdf online; add a page to a pdf in acrobat
24
A1.3
Procedure for Construction of Fault Tree
Before constructing a fault tree of any system, a very good understanding of
the system operation as well as the operation of its components and the
effects of their failure on system success is necessary. Clear and precise
definitions of system boundaries need to be established before the analysis
begins. Once this is done, the fault tree can be constructed. A typical fault tree
for the system illustrated in Fig. A1 is developed in Fig. A2.
Basic Event
Undeveloped
Event
A basic event is either a component level
event that is not further resolved or an
external event. It is at the lowest level in a
tree branch and terminates a fault tree path.
An undeveloped event is used if further
resolution of that event does not improve
the understanding of the problem, or if
further resolution is not necessary for proper
evaluation of the fault tree. It is similar to a
basic event, but is shown as a different
symbol to signify that it could be developed
further but not done so for the analysis.
First the analyst needs to define the top event. In this case, let the top event
is defined as: ‘system fails to supply water to Tank-A’.
The next step is to determine the immediate, necessary, and sufficient causes
for the occurrence of the top event. These may not be the basic causes of the
event but the immediate causes or immediate mechanisms for the event. These
immediate causes are treated as sub-top events and the analyst needs to
proceed to determine their immediate, necessary and sufficient causes to limit
of resolution of the fault tree. This limit consists of basic component failures
of one sort or another. This approach of constructing a fault tree is known as
‘immediate cause’ concept.
A1.4
Event Tree Analysis
Event trees (ET) are graphic models that order and reflect event sequences.  A
typical accident sequence consists of a PIE group, specific system failures
and successes, and their timings and human responses. An event sequence
can lead either to a successful state or to core damage. Every accident sequence
that does not lead to successful end state (safe reactor shutdown state as
defined in the plant design and technical specifications for plant operation) is
assumed to lead to core damage.
Events or ‘headings’ of an event tree can be any or combination of safety
function, safety systems, basic events and operator actions. The event tree
headings are normally arranged in either chronological or causal order.
Chronological ordering means that events are considered in the chronological
order in which they are expected to occur in an accident as depicted in
(deterministic) safety analysis. Causal ordering means that events are arranged
in the tree with ‘cause’ relationship of the preceding to the successive events.
Before constructing, an event tree the analyst needs to identify various
initiating events. The chronological plant responses to each of these initiating
events need to be understood. Once this is done, an event tree can be
constructed. A typical event tree is presented in Fig. A5 for a typical
pressurized heavy water reactor design.
25
FIG. A2 :  TYPICAL  FAULT  TREE  FOR  WATER  SUPPLY
SYSTEM  (PAGE 1  OF  FT)
System fails to
supply water to
Tank-A
Water not
available from
Path-2
Water not
available at the
outlet of MOV-2
Pipe section
between Tank-A
and MOV-2
rupture
Water not
available at the
inlet of MOV-2
Signal
failure to
MOV-2
Pipe section
between
MOV-2 and
junction-X
rupture
Water not
available at
junction-X
Water not
available from
Path-1
Water not
available at the
outlet of MOV-1
Pipe section
between Tank-A
and MOV-1
rupture
MOV-2 fails
to open on
demand
MOV-1 fails
to open
on demand
Water not
available at the
inlet of  MOV-1
MOV-2 fails
to open
(Mechanical
Failure)
MOV-1 fails
to open on
(Mechanical
Failure)
Signal
failure to
MOV-1
Pipe section
between
MOV-1 and
junction-X
rupture
Water not
available at
junction-X
Page 2 of FT
Page 2 of FT
26
FIG. A3 : FAULT  TREE  FOR  WATER  SUPPLY
SYSTEM  (PAGE 2  OF  FT)
FIG. A4 : FAULT  TREE  FOR  WATER  SUPPLY  SYSTEM  (PAGE 3  OF  FT)
Water not
available from
Pump 2
Water not
available from
pump supply
header
Water not
available from
both sump
valves
Pump supply
header rupture
Water not
available from
V-1
Water not
available from
V-2
V-1
fails to
remain
open
Sump
rupture
V-2
fails to
remain
open
Sump
rupture
V-6
fails to
remain
open
Water not available
from Pump 2
Water not
available from
V-5
Pump 2
fails to
start
V-5
fails to
remain open
Water not
available from
pump supply
header
Pump 2
fails to
run
To Page 2 of FT
Point B
To Point B
Water not
available at
Junction-X
Water not
available from
both Pumps
Water not
available from
both Pump 1
Water not
available from
both Pump 2
V-4
fails to
remain
open
Water not available
from Pump 1
Water not
available
from V-3
Pump 1
fails to
run
V-3
fails to remain
open
Water not
available from
pump supply
header
Pipe section
between Junction-
X and CKV-1
rupture
Water not available
at the outlet of
CKV-1
Water not
available at the
inlet of CKV-1
CKV-1
stuck
closed
Pipe section between
CKV-1 and pump
discharge header
rupture
Water not
available in pump
discharge header
Pump
discharge
header
rupture
Water not
available from
both pumps
To Point A
To Page 1 of FT
Point A
To Page 3 of FT
To Page 3 of FT (Point B)
27
LBLOCA
RPS                 ECCS               MCS
Consequences
CD 1
CD 2
CD 3
CD 4
Success
Failure
FIG. A5 : A TYPICAL EVENT TREE
p
p
LBLOCA:
Large break LOCA
RPS:
Reactor protection system
ECCS:
Emergency core cooling system
MCS:
Moderator circulation system
CD1:
Core damage category 1
CD2:
Core damage category 2
CD3:
Core damage category 3
CD4:
Core damage category 4
Here in this illustrative event tree, large break LOCA event is considered as an
initiating event. During any accident condition, the first action required for
nuclear safety is the reactor shutdown and maintain the reactor under long-
term sub-critical state. Hence, in the event tree development, after the initiating
event, RPS is used as event tree heading. At each event tree branch point, two
paths are developed. The upper path is normally considered as ‘success’ and
the downward path is considered as ‘Failure’ of the function/system considered
in the event tree heading.
If at this stage RPS is considered successful, the second function needs to be
ensured for the safety. The second important function during the large break
LOCA scenario is to provide long term core cooling.  These can be achieved
through ECCS or MCS. Hence, the second event tree heading is ECCS. If at
this stage ECCS is considered to be successful, there could be some fuel
failures and corresponding consequence category is assigned as CD 1. If at
this stage ECCS is considered to be a failure, then there is another level of
defense for the decay heat removal from the fuel through MCS. If at this stage
MCS is considered successful, then limited fuel failure occurs. The
corresponding consequence category assigned is CD 2. If at this stage MCS
28
is considered failure, then large fraction of fuel failure occurs. The corresponding
consequence category assigned is CD 3
If after large break LOCA, RPS is considered to be failure then the core structural
integrity cannot be maintained due to large amount of positive reactivity
addition. The corresponding consequence category is assigned as CD 4.
A1.5
Quantitative Risk Assessment of Level 1 PSA
As mentioned above, event trees are needed to be developed for all previously
identified initiating events and appropriate consequence category need to be
assigned to each end states of the accident sequences. The fault tree analyses
need to be carried out for all the safety, safety-related systems that are included
in the event tree models.
FIG. A6 :  INTEGRATION  OF  FAULT  TREE  MODELS  INTO  EVENT  TREE
Once, this is done, the quantitative risk assessment can be done by integrating
the fault tree models into the event tree models appropriately. This is illustrated
in Fig. A6. Using the computer code, the analyst evaluates the frequency of all
the accident sequences for the different consequence categories. The risk
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested