c# display pdf in browser : Adding page to pdf in preview application SDK tool html wpf asp.net online Python.3.Object.Oriented.Programming.Dusty.Phillips.201011-part398

Expecting the Unexpected
[
98 
]
Raising an exception
see how? Here's a simple class that adds items to a list only if they are even 
numbered integers:
class EvenOnly(list):
def append(self, integer):
if not isinstance(integer, int):
raise TypeError("Only integers can be added")
if integer % 2:
raise ValueError("Only even numbers can be added")
super().append(integer)
This class extends the 
list
built-in, as we discussed in Chapter 2, and overrides 
the 
append
method to check two conditions that ensure the item is an even integer. 
We first check if the input is an instance of the 
int
type, and then use the modulus 
raise
keyword is used to cause an exception to occur. The 
raise
keyword is simply 
objects are newly constructed from the built-in classes 
TypeError
and 
ValueError
create ourselves (we'll see how shortly), an exception that was defined elsewhere,  
or even an exception object that has been previously raised and handled.
error information when exceptions occur, just as before:
>>> e = EvenOnly()
>>> e.append("a string")
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "even_integers.py", line 7, in add
raise TypeError("Only integers can be added")
TypeError: Only integers can be added
>>> e.append(3)
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "even_integers.py", line 9, in add
Adding page to pdf in preview - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
adding page numbers to a pdf in preview; add pages to an existing pdf
Adding page to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
adding page numbers pdf; add page numbers to pdf in preview
Chapter 4
[
99 
]
raise ValueError("Only even numbers can be added")
ValueError: Only even numbers can be added
>>> e.append(2)
by overriding other appropriate methods, some of which are  
double-underscore methods.
What happens when an exception occurs?
at this simple function:
def no_return():
print("I am about to raise an exception")
raise Exception("This is always raised")
print("This line will never execute")
return "I won't be returned"
If we execute this function, we see that the first 
print
call is executed and then the 
exception is raised. The second 
print
statement is never executed, and the 
return
statement never executes either:
>>> no_return()
I am about to raise an exception
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "exception_quits.py", line 3, in no_return
raise Exception("This is always raised")
Exception: This is always raised
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in C# solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
add page to pdf acrobat; add page number to pdf preview
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Insert formatted text and plain text to PDF page using .NET XDoc.PDF component in C#.NET class. Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader
adding a page to a pdf file; add page number to pdf file
Expecting the Unexpected
[
100 
]
nothing will be executed in the first function after the point where the second 
let's add a second function that calls our first one:
def call_exceptor():
print("call_exceptor starts here...")
no_return()
print("an exception was raised...")
print("...so these lines don't run")
When we call this function, we see that the first print statement executes as well as 
the first line in the 
no_return
function. But once the exception is raised, nothing  
else executes:
>>> call_exceptor()
call_exceptor starts here...
I am about to raise an exception
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "method_calls_excepting.py", line 9, in call_exceptor
no_return()
File "method_calls_excepting.py", line 3, in no_return
raise Exception("This is always raised")
Exception: This is always raised
no_return
call_exceptor
, that pesky 
no_return
function was called and the exception 
the main interpreter, which finally printed the traceback.
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Studio .NET PDF SDK library supports adding text content to Add text to certain position of PDF page in Visual Add text to PDF in preview without adobe reader
add page number pdf file; add pages to pdf without acrobat
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on PDF Create a new PDF Document with one Blank Page in C#
add page numbers pdf; add pages to pdf file
Chapter 4
[
101 
]
Handling exceptions
inside a 
try
...
except
clause. The most basic syntax looks like this:
try:
no_return()
except:
print("I caught an exception")
print("executed after the exception")
If we run this simple script using our existing 
no_return
function, which we know, 
very well, always throws an exception, we get this output:
I am about to raise an exception
I caught an exception
executed after the exception
The 
no_return
function happily informs us that it is about to raise an exception. 
remainder of the code in the 
no_return
function still went unexecuted, but the  
code that called the function was able to recover and continue.
Note the indentation around 
try
and 
except
. The 
try
clause wraps any code that 
might throw an exception. The 
except
clause is then back on the same indentation 
level as the 
try
line. Any code to handle the exception is indented after the 
except
clause. Then normal code resumes at the original indentation level.
What if we were writing some code that could raise both a 
TypeError
and a 
ZeroDivisionError
? We might want to catch the 
ZeroDivisionError
, but let the 
TypeError
function that does just that:
def funny_division(anumber):
try:
return 100 / anumber
except ZeroDivisionError:
return "Silly wabbit, you can't divide by zero!"
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
This C# .NET Word document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class applications
adding page numbers to pdf files; add document to pdf pages
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
This C# .NET PowerPoint document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class
add page numbers to a pdf file; add remove pages from pdf
Expecting the Unexpected
[
102 
]
print(funny_division(0))
print(funny_division(50.0))
print(funny_division("hello"))
The function is tested with 
print
statements that show it behaving as expected:
Silly wabbit, you can't divide by zero!
2.0
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "catch_specific_exception.py", line 9, in <module>
print(funny_division("hello"))
File "catch_specific_exception.py", line 3, in funny_division
return 100 / anumber
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for /: 'int' and 'str'
The first line of output shows that if we enter 0, we get properly mocked. If we 
TypeError
, weren't you?), it fails with an exception. If we had used an empty 
except
clause, that didn't specify a 
ZeroDivisionError
, it would have accused us 
TypeError
and 
ZeroDivisionError
with the same exception handler, but it may 
also raise a 
ValueError
if you supply the number 13:
def funny_division2(anumber):
try:
if anumber == 13:
raise ValueError("13 is an unlucky number")
return 100 / anumber
except (ZeroDivisionError, TypeError):
return "Enter a number other than zero"
for val in (0, "hello", 50.0, 13):
print("Testing {}:".format(val), end=" ")
print(funny_division2(val))
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
& Insert PowerPoint Page/Slide in C#. Use the provided easy to call and write APIs programmed in C# class to develop user-defined PowerPoint slide adding and
adding page numbers to pdf documents; add page to pdf preview
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
1. Support embedding, removing, adding and updating ICCProfile. 2. Render text to text, PDF, or Word file. You will see the following aspects on this guide page.
add a page to pdf file; add and remove pages from pdf file online
Chapter 4
[
103 
]
The 
for
results. If you're wondering about that 
end
argument in the print statement, it simply 
next line. Here's a run of the script :
Testing 0: Enter a number other than zero
Testing hello: Enter a number other than zero
Testing 50.0: 2.0
Testing 13: Traceback (most recent call last):
File "catch_multiple_exceptions.py", line 11, in <module>
print(funny_division2(val))
File "catch_multiple_exceptions.py", line 4, in funny_division2
raise ValueError("13 is an unlucky number")
ValueError: 13 is an unlucky number
The number 0 and the string are both caught by the 
except
clause and a suitable 
is a 
ValueError
, which was not included in the types of exceptions being handled.
to stack 
except
clauses, and only one will be executed. For the second question, the 
raise
inside an exception handler, observe:
def funny_division3(anumber):
try:
if anumber == 13:
raise ValueError("13 is an unlucky number")
return 100 / anumber
except ZeroDivisionError:
return "Enter a number other than zero"
except TypeError:
return "Enter a numerical value"
except ValueError:
print("No, No, not 13!")
raise raise
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging It's a demo code for adding image to word page using C#.
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add contents page to pdf
Expecting the Unexpected
[
104 
]
The last line re-raises the 
ValueError
, so after outputting 
No,
No,
not
13!
, it will 
If we stack exception clauses like we did above, only the first matching clause will 
be run, even if more than one of them fit. How can more than one clause match? 
the next section, most exceptions extend the 
Exception
class (which is, itself, derived 
from 
BaseException
). If we catch 
Exception
before we catch 
TypeError
, then only 
the 
Exception
handler will be executed, because 
TypeError
is an 
Exception
,  
by inheritance.
This can come in handy in cases where we want to handle some exceptions 
specifically, and then handle all remaining exceptions in a more general case. We 
can simply catch Exception
after catching any specific exceptions and handle the 
general case there.
Sometimes when we catch an exception, we need a reference to the 
Exception
object itself. This most often happens if we define our own exceptions with custom 
attributes in the exception handler. If we define our own exception class, we can even 
a variable uses the 
as
keyword:
try:
raise ValueError("This is an argument")
except ValueError as e:
print("The exception arguments were", e.args)
ValueError
upon initialization.
In Python 2.5 and earlier, the as keyword did not work for naming an 
exception. Instead a comma was used, so the previous example would 
look like except ValueError, e: This was changed in Python 3.0 to 
(as in except ValueError, TypeError), and the change was 
backported to Python 2.6. The as keyword is therefore supported in most 
modern versions, but if you're working with an older interpreter, keep 
this syntax difference in mind, as it is bound to catch you.
Chapter 4
[
105 
]
occurred. We also can't specify code that should be executed only if an exception 
does not occur. Two more keywords, 
finally
and 
else
, can provide the missing 
handling code is run that illustrates the newly introduced syntax:
import random
some_exceptions = [ValueError, TypeError, IndexError, None]
try:
choice = random.choice(some_exceptions)
print("raising {}".format(choice))
if choice:
raise choice("An error")
except ValueError:
print("Caught a ValueError")
except TypeError:
print("Caught a TypeError")
except Exception as e:
print("Caught some other error: %s" %
( e.__class__.__name__))
else:
print("This code called if there is no exception")
finally:
print("This cleanup code is always called")
on which exception 
random
chooses. Here are some example runs:
$ python finally_and_else.py 
raising None
This code called if there is no exception
This cleanup code is always called
$ python finally_and_else.py 
raising <class 'TypeError'>
Caught a TypeError
This cleanup code is always called
Expecting the Unexpected
[
106 
]
$ python finally_and_else.py 
raising <class 'IndexError'>
Caught some other error: IndexError
This cleanup code is always called
$ python finally_and_else.py 
raising <class 'ValueError'>
Caught a ValueError
This cleanup code is always called
Note how the 
print
statement in the 
finally
clause is executed no matter what. 
connection, close an open file, or send a closing handshake over the network when 
our code has finished running, even if an exception has occurred. This can also be 
applied in interesting ways if we are inside a 
try
clause when we 
return
from a 
function; the 
finally
handle will still be executed upon return.
Also pay attention to the output when no exception is raised; both the 
else
and the 
finally
clauses are executed. The 
else
clause may seem redundant, as it appears 
after the entire 
try
...
except
block. However, this code would still be executed in  
we discuss using exceptions as flow control, shortly.
Any of the 
except
else
, and 
finally
clauses can be omitted after a 
try
block 
(although, 
else
, by itself is invalid). If you include more than one, the 
except
clauses must come first, then the 
else
clause, with the 
finally
clause at the end. 
The order of the 
except
clauses normally goes from most specific to most generic.
Exception hierarchy
As we noticed above, most exceptions are subclasses of the 
Exception
class. But 
this is not true of all exceptions. 
Exception
itself actually inherits from a class 
called 
BaseException
(In fact, all exceptions must extend the 
BaseException
class or one of its subclasses). There are two key exceptions, 
SystemExit
and 
KeyboardInterrupt
, that derive directly from 
BaseException
instead  
of 
Exception
.
Chapter 4
[
107 
]
SystemExit
is an exception that is raised whenever the program exits naturally, 
typically because we called the 
sys.exit
function somewhere in our code (for 
finally
where we might want to stop the program exiting, for example if there are unsaved 
handle 
SystemExit
at all, it's because we want to do something special with it or 
BaseException
.
The 
KeyboardInterrupt
exception is common in command-line programs.  
OS-dependent key combination (normally Ctrl + C). This is a standard way for the 
user to deliberately interrupt a running program, and like 
SystemExit
, it should 
almost always respond by terminating the program. Also like 
SystemExit
, it  
should handle any cleanup tasks inside 
finally
blocks.
Here is a class diagram that fully illustrates the exception hierarchy:
When we use the 
except:
clause without specifying any type of exception, it will 
catch all subclasses of 
BaseException
, which is to say, it will catch all exceptions, 
unwise to use the 
except:
statement without any arguments. If you want to catch 
all exceptions other than the two we just discussed, explicitly catch 
Exception
. As 
we discussed earlier, make sure this is the last 
except
clause if you're trying to catch 
other more specific exceptions separately.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested