c# display pdf in browser : Add and delete pages in pdf Library software class asp.net winforms .net ajax Python.3.Object.Oriented.Programming.Dusty.Phillips.201018-part405

Python Data Structures
[
168 
]
one statement:
>>> d = defaultdict(tuple_counter)
>>> d['a'][1].append("hello")
>>> d['b'][1].append('world')
>>> d
defaultdict(<function tuple_counter at 0x82f2c6c>, 
{'a': (1, ['hello']), 'b': (2, ['world'])})
When we print the 
dict
at the end, we see that the counter really was working.
This example, while succinctly demonstrating how to create our own 
function for defaultdict, is not actually very good code; using a global 
variable means that if we created four different defaultdict segments 
that each used a tuple_counter, it would count the number of entries 
in all dictionaries, rather than having a different count for each one. 
It would be better to create a class and pass a method on that class to 
defaultdict.
Lists
Lists
functionality.
I direct you to the official Python tutorial, post-haste. It can be found online at:
http://docs.python.org/py3k/tutorial/
Add and delete pages in pdf - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
adding page numbers to pdf document; add pdf pages to word document
Add and delete pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add pages to pdf preview; adding page numbers in pdf
Chapter 6
[
169 
]
objects we've defined ourselves. Lists should always be used when we want to store 
they can also be sorted by some criteria.
of the list, or update a value within the list.
Like dictionaries, Python lists use an extremely efficient and well-tuned internal data 
some of these classes, if optimizing access to huge sets of data is required. Normally, 
has complete control over how they access it.
for example, they might write 
['a',
1,
'b',
3]
for our letter frequency list. They'd 
operator to determine which position was being accessed.
structure can have on the readability of our code.
import string
CHARACTERS  = list(string.ascii_letters) + [" "]
def letter_frequency(sentence):
frequencies = [(c, 0) for c in CHARACTERS]
for letter in sentence:
index = CHARACTERS.index(letter)
frequencies[index] = (letter,frequencies[index][1]+1) 
return frequencies
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references: How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
add a page to a pdf file; add a page to a pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
XDoc.PDF enables you to delete PDF page(s) with customized options, including a single page, a series of pages, and random pages to be Add necessary references
add page numbers pdf files; add pages to pdf document
Python Data Structures
[
170 
]
This code starts with a list of possible characters. The 
string.ascii_letters
attribute
The first line inside the function uses a list comprehension to turn the 
CHARACTERS
tool in Python; we'll be covering them in detail in the next chapter.
Then we loop over each of the characters in the sentence. We first look up the index 
of the character in the 
CHARACTERS
list, which we know has the same index in our 
frequencies list, since we just created the second list from the first. We then update 
Aside from the garbage collection and memory waste concerns, this is rather difficult 
to read!
in sorted order. The output shows the difference:
>>> letter_frequency("the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog")
('X', 0), ('Y', 0), ('Z', 0), (' ', 8)]
The dictionary version could be adapted to provide these advantages by  
invoked upon them. The most common is 
append(element)
, which adds an element 
to the list. Similarly, 
insert(index,
element)
inserts an item at a specific position. 
The 
count(element)
method tells us how many times an element appears in the  
list, and 
index()
—as we saw in the previous example—tells us the index of an  
item in the list. The 
reverse()
method does exactly what it says: turning the list 
around. The 
sort()
method is also obvious, but it has some fairly complicated 
object-oriented behaviors, which we'll cover now.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image
adding a page to a pdf; add blank page to pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
add pages to pdf without acrobat; add page numbers to pdf document in preview
Chapter 6
[
171 
]
Sorting lists
Without any parameters, 
sort
will generally do the expected thing. If it's a list of 
capital letters will be sorted before lower case letters, that is 
Z
comes before 
a
. If it is a 
the list is sorted by the first element in each tuple. If a mixture of unsortable items is 
supplied, the sort will raise a 
TypeError
exception.
If we want to place objects we define ourselves into a list and make those objects 
sortable, we have to do a bit more work. The special method 
__lt__
, which stands 
for "less than", should be defined on the class to make instances of that class 
comparable. The 
sort
method on list will access this method on each object to 
determine where it goes in the list. This method should return 
True
if our class is 
somehow less than the passed parameter, and 
False
otherwise. Here's a rather silly 
class that can be sorted based on either a string or a number:
class WeirdSortee:
def __init__(self, string, number, sort_num):
self.string = string
self.number = number
self.sort_num = sort_num
def __lt__(self, object):
if self.sort_num:
return self.number < object.number
return self.string < object.string
def __repr__(self):
return"{}:{}".format(self.string, self.number)
The 
__repr__
method makes it easy to see the two values when we print a list. This 
__lt__
any duck typed object that has 
string
number
, and 
sort_num
attributes; it will fail 
when it comes to sorting:
>>> a = WeirdSortee('a', 4, True)
>>> b = WeirdSortee('b', 3, True)
>>> c = WeirdSortee('c', 2, True)
>>> d = WeirdSortee('d', 1, True)
>>> l = [a,b,c,d]
>>> l
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file. These two demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
add page number to pdf file; add pages to pdf file
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
add and delete pages in pdf; adding page numbers to pdf in reader
Python Data Structures
[
172 
]
[a:4, b:3, c:2, d:1]
>>> l.sort()
>>> l
[d:1, c:2, b:3, a:4]
>>> for i in l:
...     i.sort_num = False
... 
>>> l.sort()
>>> l
[a:4, b:3, c:2, d:1]
The first time we call 
sort
, it sorts by numbers, because 
sort_num
is 
True
on all the 
objects being compared. The second time, it sorts by letters. The 
__lt__
method is 
implemented, the class should normally also implement the similar 
__gt__
__eq__
__ne__
__ge__
, and 
__le__
methods, so that all of the 
<
>
==
!=
>=
, and 
<=
operators also work properly.
The 
sort
method can also take an optional 
key
argument. This argument is a 
item in the tuple rather than the first (which is the default for sorting tuples):
>>> x = [(1,'c'), (2,'a'), (3, 'b')]
>>> x.sort()
>>> x
[(1, 'c'), (2, 'a'), (3, 'b')]
>>> x.sort(key=lambda i: i[1])
>>> x
[(2, 'a'), (3, 'b'), (1, 'c')]
The 
lambda
keyword in the command line creates a function that takes a tuple as 
item in the tuple).
As another example, we can also use the 
key
parameter to make a sort case 
of strings, so we can pass the built-in 
str.lower
function as the key function:
>>> l = ["hello", "HELP", "Helo"]
>>> l.sort()
>>> l
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to textMgr.SelectChar(page, cursor) ' Delete a selected As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save
add page numbers to pdf using preview; adding page numbers to pdf in
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file. These C# demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
add a page to a pdf document; add page numbers to pdf
Chapter 6
[
173 
]
['HELP', 'Helo', 'hello']
>>> l.sort(key=str.lower)
>>> l
['hello', 'Helo', 'HELP']
Remember, even though 
lower
is a method on string objects, it is also a function that 
can accept a single argument, 
self
. In other words, 
str.lower(item)
is equivalent 
to 
item.lower()
. When we pass this function as a key, it performs the comparison 
Sets
unordered group of (usually) unique numbers. We can add a number to a set five 
times, but it will show up in the set only once.
In Python, sets can hold any hashable object, not just numbers. Hashable objects 
tuples and creates a set of the artists:
song_library = [("Phantom Of The Opera", "Sarah Brightman"),
("Knocking On Heaven's Door", "Guns N' Roses"),
("Captain Nemo", "Sarah Brightman"),
("Patterns In The Ivy", "Opeth"),
("November Rain", "Guns N' Roses"),
("Beautiful", "Sarah Brightman"),
("Mal's Song", "Vixy and Tony")]
artists = set()
for song, artist in song_library:
artists.add(artist)
print(artists)
Python Data Structures
[
174 
]
create a set using the 
set()
constructor. However, we can use the curly braces of 
to separate pairs of values, it's a dictionary, as in 
{'key':
'value',
'key2':
'value2'}
. If we just separate values with commas, it's a set, as in 
{'value',
'value2'}
. Items can be added individually to the set using its 
add
method.  
If we run this script, we see that the set works as advertised:
{'Sarah Brightman', "Guns N' Roses", 'Vixy and Tony', 'Opeth'}
both use an underlying hash-based data structure for efficiency. Because they are 
This output shows all three of these activities:
>>> "Opeth" in artists
True
>>> for artist in artists:
...     print("{} plays good music".format(artist))
... 
Sarah Brightman plays good music
Guns N' Roses plays good music
Vixy and Tony play good music
Opeth plays good music
>>> alphabetical = list(artists)
>>> alphabetical.sort()
>>> alphabetical
["Guns N' Roses", 'Opeth', 'Sarah Brightman', 'Vixy and Tony']
While the primary feature of a set is uniqueness, that is not its primary purpose
methods on the set type operate on other sets, allowing us to efficiently combine or 
of which is the calling set and which is the called set.
Chapter 6
[
175 
]
The 
union
method is the most common and easiest to understand. It takes a second 
set aseither 
once in the new set. Union is like a logical 
or
operation, indeed, the 
|
operator can be 
used to get the same effect, if you don't like calling methods.
Conversely, the 
intersection
method accepts a second set and returns a new 
set that contains only those elements that are in both sets. It is like a logical 
and
operation, and can also be referenced using the 
&
operator.
Finally, the 
symmetric_difference
method tells us what's left; it is the set of objects 
my_artists = {"Sarah Brightman", "Guns N' Roses",
"Opeth", "Vixy and Tony"}
auburns_artists = {"Nickelback", "Guns N' Roses",
"Savage Garden"}
print("All: {}".format(my_artists.union(auburns_artists)))
print("Both: {}".format(auburns_artists.intersection(my_artists)))
print("Either but not both: {}".format(
my_artists.symmetric_difference(auburns_artists)))
suggest they will do:
All: {'Sarah Brightman', "Guns N' Roses", 'Vixy and Tony', 
'Savage Garden', 'Opeth', 'Nickelback'}
Both: {"Guns N' Roses"}
Either but not both: {'Savage Garden', 'Opeth', 'Nickelback', 
'Sarah Brightman', 'Vixy and Tony'}
can say 
my_artists.union(auburns_artists)
or 
auburns_artists.union(my_
artists)
and get the same result. There are also methods that return different 
results depending on who is the caller and who is the argument. 
Python Data Structures
[
176 
]
These methods include 
issubset
and 
issuperset
, which are the inverse of each 
other. Both return a boolean. The 
issubset
method returns 
True
, if all of the items 
in the calling set are also in the set passed as an argument. The 
issuperset
method 
returns 
True
, if all of the items in the argument are also in the calling set. Thus 
s.issubset(t)
and 
t.issuperset(s)
are identical. They will both return 
True
if 
t
contains all the elements in 
s
Finally, the 
difference
method returns all the elements that are in the calling set, 
but not in the set passed as an argument; this is like half a 
symmetric_difference
The difference method can also be represented by the 
-
operator. The following code 
illustrates these methods in action:
my_artists = {"Sarah Brightman", "Guns N' Roses",
"Opeth", "Vixy and Tony"}
bands = {"Guns N' Roses", "Opeth"}
print("my_artists is to bands:")
print("issuperset: {}".format(my_artists.issuperset(bands)))
print("issubset: {}".format(my_artists.issubset(bands)))
print("difference: {}".format(my_artists.difference(bands)))
print("*"*20)
print("bands is to my_artists:")
print("issuperset: {}".format(bands.issuperset(my_artists)))
print("issubset: {}".format(bands.issubset(my_artists)))
print("difference: {}".format(bands.difference(my_artists)))
This code simply prints out the response of each method when called from one set on 
the other. Running it gives us the following output:
my_artists is to bands:
issuperset: True
issubset: False
difference: {'Sarah Brightman', 'Vixy and Tony'}
********************
bands is to my_artists:
issuperset: False
issubset: True
difference: set()
The 
difference
method, in the second case, returns an empty set, since there are no 
items in 
bands
that are not in 
my_artists
.
Chapter 6
[
177 
]
The 
union
intersection
, and 
difference
methods can all take multiple sets as 
operation is called on all the parameters.
sources and need to quickly combine them in some way, to determine where the data 
overlaps, or is different, we can use set operations to efficiently compare them. Or 
Extending built-ins
We discussed briefly in Chapter 3 how built-in data types can be extended using 
methods on it to do what we want (inheritance).
For example, if we want to ensure every item in a 
list
is a string with exactly five 
characters, we need to extend 
list
and override the 
append()
method to raise an 
exception for invalid input. We'd also have to override 
__setitem__(self,
index,
value)
, a special method on lists that is called whenever we use the 
x[index]
=
"value"
syntax.
suggests that object-oriented programming is always better. That question is easy 
programmer? Which requires less typing?:
c = a + b
c = a.add(b)
l[0] = 5
l.setitem(0, 5)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested