c# display pdf in winform : Adding pages to a pdf document control SDK platform web page wpf azure web browser QuickBooks_2014_The_Missing_Manual11-part586

CHAPteR 4: SETTING UP CUSTOMERS, JOBS, AND VENDORS
81
WORKING WITH 
CUSTOMERS, 
JOBS, AND  
VENDORS
Working with Customers, Jobs, and  
Vendors
After you create customer, job, and vendor records, you might have to come back 
to add more data or change what’s already there. For example, you can add contact 
info as you gather it over time. Or you may decide to categorize customers, jobs, 
and vendors, which is handy for slicing and dicing your financial performance to 
analyze income, expenses, profitability, and so on. 
Because customers, jobs, and vendors come and go, eventually your Customers & 
Jobs List and Vendors List will become cluttered with people and organizations you 
no longer do business with. Hiding these obsolete names keeps your lists focused. Of 
course, if you create records by mistake, you can delete them. You can also merge 
records in QuickBooks to, for example, combine the records for two companies that 
merged in real life. This section explains how to accomplish all these modifications.
Modifying Customer, Job, and Vendor Information
You can edit customer, job, and vendor records at any time after you create them. 
For example, you might change address and contact info, decrease a credit limit, 
or lengthen payment terms.
QuickBooks gives you a few ways to open the edit windows for these records (Edit 
Customer, Edit Job, and Edit Vendor). Here are your options:
• Edit a customer or job. First, open the Customer Center (page 38). Then, on 
the Customers & Jobs tab, double-click the customer or job you want to tweak. 
Alternatively, right-click the customer or job and then choose Edit Customer:Job 
from the shortcut menu. You can also select the customer or job you want to 
edit and then press Ctrl+E or, on the right side of the Customer Center, click the 
Edit button (its icon looks like a pencil).
• Edit a vendor. In the Vendor Center (choose Vendors→Vendor Center), on the 
Vendors tab, double-click the vendor you want to modify. You can also right-
click the vendor and then choose Edit Vendor from the shortcut menu. Another 
method is to select the vendor in the list and then press Ctrl+E or, on the right 
side of the Vendor Center, click the Edit button (its icon looks like a pencil).
 NOTE 
If you want to modify 
multiple
customer, job, or vendor records at once, see page 118 in Chapter 6.
When you edit these records, you can make changes to all the fields except Current 
Balance. QuickBooks calculates that value from the opening balance (if you provide 
one) and any unpaid invoices for that customer or job (or unpaid bills for a vendor). 
Once a record exists, you modify the current balance by creating transactions like 
invoices (page 217), credit memos (page 268), bills (page 176), journal entries (page 
436), or payment discounts (page 334).
Adding pages to a pdf document - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
adding page numbers to pdf; adding page numbers pdf
Adding pages to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add page number to pdf online
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
82
WORKING WITH 
CUSTOMERS, 
JOBS, AND  
VENDORS
You can’t change the currency assigned to a customer, job, or vendor if you’ve re-
corded any transactions for them. So if the company moves from Florida to France 
and starts using euros, you’ll need to close its current balance by receiving pay-
ments for outstanding customer or job invoices, or by paying a vendor’s bills. Then, 
you can create a 
new
customer, job, or vendor record in QuickBooks and assign 
the new currency to it. After the new record is ready to go, you can make the old 
record inactive (page 86).
 WARNING 
Unless you’ve revamped your naming standard (page 66), don’t edit the value in a record’s name 
field (Customer Name, Job Name, or Vendor Name). Why? Because doing so can mess up things like customized 
reports you’ve created that are filtered by a specific name; such reports aren’t smart enough to automatically 
use the new name. So if you do modify a Customer Name, Job Name, or Vendor Name field, make sure to modify 
any customizations to use the new name.
Categorizing Customers, Jobs, and Vendors
If you want to report and analyze your financial performance to see where your busi-
ness comes from and which type is most profitable, categorizing your QuickBooks 
customers, jobs, and vendors is the way to go. For example, customer and job types 
can help you produce a report of kitchen remodel jobs that you’re working on for 
residential customers. With that report, you can order catered dinners to treat those 
clients to customer service they’ll brag about to their friends. If you run a construction 
company, knowing that your commercial customers cause fewer headaches 
and
that 
doing work for them is more profitable than residential jobs is a strong motivator to 
focus future marketing efforts on commercial work. Similarly, you might categorize 
vendors to track what you spend with companies versus individual contractors or 
to classify vendors by geographic location. The box on page 84 explains how you 
can analyze your business in other ways.
You can add and assign customer, job, and vendor 
types
anytime. If you don’t have 
time to add types now, come back to this section when you’re ready to learn how.
UNDERSTANDING CUSTOMER, JOB, AND VENDOR TYPES
Business owners often like to look at the performance of different segments of 
their businesses. Say your building-supply company has expanded over the years 
to include sales to homeowners, and you want to know how much you sell to home-
owners versus professional contractors. In that case, you can make this comparison 
by using customer types to designate each customer as a homeowner or a contrac-
tor and then total sales by Customer Type, as shown in Figure 4-7. Job types and 
vendor types work in a similar way. For example, job types could help you evaluate 
the profitability of new construction, remodeling, and maintenance work. As you’ll 
learn on page 72, categorizing a customer, job, or vendor is as easy as choosing 
from the Customer Type, Job Type, or Vendor Type lists.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods in VB.NET. Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file
add page numbers to pdf in preview; add a page to a pdf file
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Using this C# .NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF
add page numbers to pdf using preview; add blank page to pdf
CHAPteR 4: SETTING UP CUSTOMERS, JOBS, AND VENDORS
83
WORKING WITH 
CUSTOMERS, 
JOBS, AND  
VENDORS
FiGURE 4-7
The Sales by Customer 
Detail report initially 
totals income by customer. 
To subtotal income by 
customer type (in this 
example, corporate, 
government, professional, 
and so on), click Customize 
Report in the report 
window’s button bar. On 
the Display tab of the 
dialog box that appears, 
choose “Customer type” in 
the “Total by” drop-down 
list, and then click OK.
These types are yours to mold into whatever categories help you analyze your busi-
ness. A healthcare provider might classify customers by their insurance, because 
reimbursement levels depend on whether a patient has Medicare, uses major medical 
insurance, or pays privately. A clothing maker might classify customers as custom, 
retail, or wholesale, because the markup percentages are different for each. And a 
training company could categorize customers by how they learned about the com-
pany’s services. This flexibility applies to job and vendor types, too.
 NOTE 
As you’ll see throughout this book, QuickBooks’ lists make it easy to fill in information in most 
QuickBooks dialog boxes by choosing from a list instead of typing.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages Sorting Pages. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including
add pages to pdf without acrobat; add page numbers to a pdf in preview
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Library. Best and multifunctional Visual Studio .NET PDF SDK supports adding and inserting text content to adobe PDF document in C#.
add pages to pdf acrobat; add a page to a pdf
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
84
WORKING WITH 
CUSTOMERS, 
JOBS, AND  
VENDORS
GEM IN THE ROUGH
Categorizing with Classes
The Class Tracking feature explained on page 134 is a powerful 
and often misunderstood way to categorize a business. Classes 
are powerful because of their ability to cross income, expense, 
account, customer, job, and vendor boundaries.
Say you want to track how much each sales region actually sells 
to figure out who gets to host your annual sales shindig. Your 
income accounts show sales by products and services, even if 
each region sells all those items. Customer types won’t help 
if some large customers buy products from several regions. 
The same goes if a job requires a smorgasbord of what you 
sell. To solve this sales-by-region dilemma, you can create a 
class for each region.
When you turn on Class Tracking, every transaction includes 
a Class field. Unlike the Customer Type, Job Type, and Vendor 
Type fields—which you assign when you create a customer, job, 
or vendor—a transaction’s Class field starts out blank. For each 
invoice, sales receipt, bill, and so on, simply choose the class 
for the region that made the sale or incurred the expense. That 
way, you can produce a report sorted by class that shows each 
region’s performance.
As you’ll learn on page 135, classes can track information that 
spans multiple customers, jobs, and vendors, such as business 
unit, company division, and office location. But don’t expect 
miracles—classes work best when you stick to using them to 
track only one thing. If you want to apply classes for different 
purposes, such as both business units 
and
locations, you can 
create subclasses to further categorize your data. For example, 
you could create top-level classes for your locations, and then 
create subclasses for the business units in each location.
If you create a company file by using an industry-specific edition of QuickBooks or 
you select an industry when creating your company file (page 11), QuickBooks fills 
in the Customer Type, Job Type, and Vendor Type lists with a few types that are 
typical for your industry. If your business sense is eccentric, you can delete Quick-
Books’ suggestions and replace them with your own entries. For example, if you’re a 
landscaper, you might include customer types such as Green Thumb, Means Well, or 
Lethal, so you can decide whether orchids, cacti, or Astroturf are most appropriate. 
 TIP 
A common mistake is creating customer types that don’t relate to customer characteristics. (The same 
holds true for job types and vendor types.) For example, if you provide several kinds of services—like financial 
forecasting, investment advice, and reading fortunes—your customers might hire you to perform any or all of 
those services. So if you classify your customers by the services you offer, you’ll wonder which customer type 
to choose when someone hires you for two different services. Instead, go with customer types that describe the 
customer in some way, like Economics, Investments, and Gambler.
Here are some suggestions for using customer, job, and vendor types and other 
QuickBooks features to analyze your business in different ways:
• Customer business type. Use customer types to classify your customers by 
their business sector, such as Corporate, Government, and Small Business.
• Nonprofit “customers.” For nonprofit organizations, customer types such as 
Member, Individual, Corporation, Foundation, and Government Agency can help 
you target fundraising efforts.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page, you will find detailed guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page
add pages to pdf online; adding page numbers to pdf documents
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Multifunctional Visual Studio .NET PDF SDK library supports adding text content to adobe PDF document in VB.NET WinForms and ASP.NET.
add page number to pdf in preview; add pdf pages to word document
CHAPteR 4: SETTING UP CUSTOMERS, JOBS, AND VENDORS
85
WORKING WITH 
CUSTOMERS, 
JOBS, AND  
VENDORS
• Job type. Jobs are optional in QuickBooks, so job types matter only if you track 
your work by the job. If your sole source of income is selling organic chicken-fat 
ripple ice cream, jobs and job types don’t matter—your relationship with your 
customers is one long run of selling and delivering products. But for project-
based businesses, job types add another level of filtering to the reports you 
produce. If you’re a writer, then you can use job types to track the kinds of 
documents you produce (Manual, White Paper, and Marketing Propaganda, for 
instance) and filter the Job Profitability Report by job type to see which forms 
of writing are the most lucrative. (Page 602 describes how to filter reports.)
• Vendor type. Use vendor types to categorize vendors in different ways, such 
as by industry, location, or type of company.
• Location or region. Customer types or classes can help track business per-
formance if your company spans multiple regions, offices, or business units.
• Services. To track how much of your business comes from each type of service 
you offer, set up separate income accounts or subaccounts in your chart of ac-
counts, as outlined on page 46.
• Products. To track product sales, create one or more income accounts or sub-
accounts in your chart of accounts.
 TIP 
Create income accounts for broad categories of income, such as services and products. Don’t create 
separate accounts for each service or product you sell; you can use items to track sales for each service and 
product instead, as described in Chapter 5.
• Expenses. To track expenses, create one or more expense accounts or sub-
accounts in your chart of accounts.
• Marketing. To identify the income you earned based on how customers learned 
about your services, create classes such as Referral, Web, Newspaper, and Blimp, 
or enter this info in a custom field (page 73). That way, you can create a report 
that shows the revenue you’ve earned from different marketing efforts—and 
figure out whether each one is worth the money.
CREATING A VENDOR, CUSTOMER, OR JOB TYPE
You can create these types when you set up your QuickBooks company file or at any 
time after setup. See page 142 in Chapter 7 to learn how to create customer, job, and 
vendor types and subtypes. Here’s how to see the different type 
lists
:
• Customer types. Choose Lists→Customer & Vendor Profile Lists→Customer 
Type List. 
• Job types. Choose Lists→Customer & Vendor Profile Lists→Job Type List. 
• Vendor types. Choose Lists→Customer & Vendor Profile Lists→Vendor Type 
List. 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Rapidly load, create, convert and edit PDF document (pages) in C# class with .NET PDF library. Support protecting PDF file by adding password and digital
add pages to pdf reader; add pages to pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program.
add page to pdf; add a page to a pdf online
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
86
WORKING WITH 
CUSTOMERS, 
JOBS, AND  
VENDORS
Hiding Records
Hiding customers, jobs, and vendors isn’t about barricading them in a conference 
room when the competition shows up to talk to you. Because QuickBooks lets you 
delete these records only in very limited circumstances, hiding them helps keep your 
lists manageable and your financial history intact.
Although your work with a customer, job, or vendor might be over, you still have to 
keep records about your past relationship. But old records can clutter up the name 
lists that QuickBooks displays, making it difficult to select the people and companies 
you still work with. The solution is to 
hide
old records, which also removes those 
names from all the lists that appear in transaction windows so you can’t select them 
by mistake. Hiding old records is a better solution than deleting them, because 
QuickBooks retains the historical transactions for those customers, jobs, or vendors 
so you can reactivate them if you renew the relationship.
To hide a customer or job, in the Customer Center’s Customers & Jobs tab, right-click 
the customer or job and then, from the shortcut menu, choose Make Customer:Job 
Inactive. The customer and any associated jobs disappear from the list. Figure 4-8 
shows you how to 
unhide
(reactivate) customers. 
To hide a vendor, in the Vendor Center’s Vendors tab, right-click the vendor and 
then, from the shortcut menu, choose Make Vendor Inactive.
FiGURE 4-8
To make hidden customers visible again and reactivate their records, 
set the drop-down list at the top of the Customers & Jobs tab to All 
Customers, as shown here. 
QuickBooks displays an X to the left of every inactive customer in the 
list. Simply click that X to restore the customer to active duty.
CHAPteR 4: SETTING UP CUSTOMERS, JOBS, AND VENDORS
87
WORKING WITH 
CUSTOMERS, 
JOBS, AND  
VENDORS
Deleting Records
You can delete customers, jobs, or vendors only if there’s no activity for them in your 
QuickBooks file. If you try to delete a record that has even one transaction associ-
ated with it, QuickBooks tells you that you can’t delete that record.
If you create a customer, job, or vendor by mistake, you can remove it, as long as 
you first remove any associated transactions—which are likely to be mistakes as 
well. But QuickBooks doesn’t 
tell
you which transactions are preventing you from 
deleting the record. To find and delete transactions that prevent you from deleting 
a record, follow these steps:
1. In the Customer Center, view all the transactions for a customer or job by 
selecting that customer or job in the Customers & Jobs tab, and then, in 
the Transactions pane, setting the Show box to All Transactions and the 
Date box to All.
You can also view transactions by running the “Transaction List by Customer” 
report (Reports→Customers & Receivables→Transaction List by Customer).
For a 
vendor
, select the vendor in the Vendor Center’s Vendors tab, and then, 
in the Transactions pane, set the Show box to All Transactions and the Date box 
to All, as shown in Figure 4-9.
FiGURE 4-9
When you select a vendor 
in the Vendor Center, the 
Transaction pane in the 
lower right shows that 
vendor’s transactions. 
To see them 
all
, in the 
Show drop-down list, 
choose All Transactions, 
and in the Date drop-down 
list, choose All.
2. In the Customer or Vendor Center (or the appropriate transaction list report), 
open the transaction you want to delete by double-clicking it.
The Create Invoices window (or the corresponding transaction window) opens 
to the transaction you double-clicked.
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
88
WORKING WITH 
CUSTOMERS, 
JOBS, AND  
VENDORS
3. Right-click the transaction window and choose the Delete entry (Delete 
Invoice, Delete Check, and so on) from the shortcut menu (or choose 
EditDelete Invoice, EditDelete Check, or the corresponding delete 
command).
In the message box that appears, click OK to confirm that you want to delete 
the transaction.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for every transaction for that customer, job, or vendor.
5. Back on the Customers & Jobs or Vendors tab, select the customer, job, or 
vendor you want to delete, and then press Ctrl+D (or choose EditDelete 
Customer:Job or EditDelete Vendor.)
If the customer, job, or vendor has no transactions, QuickBooks asks you to 
confirm that you want to delete the record; click OK. If you see a message stat-
ing that you 
can’t
delete it, go back to steps 2 and 3 to delete any remaining 
transactions.
Merging Records
Suppose you remodeled buildings for two companies run by brothers: Morey’s City 
Diner and Les’s Exercise Studio. Morey and Les conclude that their businesses have 
a lot of synergy—people are either eating or trying to lose weight, and usually do-
ing both. To smooth out their cash flow, they decide to merge their companies into 
More or Less Body Building and All You Can Eat Buffet. Your challenge: to create one 
customer in QuickBooks from the two businesses, while retaining the jobs, invoices, 
and other transactions that you created when the companies were separate. The 
solution: QuickBooks’ merge feature, which works in the same way whether you’re 
merging customers, jobs, or vendors.
 TIP 
Here’s another instance when merging can come in handy: If you don’t use a standard naming convention 
(page 66 offers several easy naming conventions), you could end up with multiple customer records representing 
one real-life customer, such as Les’s Exercise Studio and LesEx. You can merge these doppelgangers into one 
customer just as you can merge two truly separate companies into one.
When you merge records in QuickBooks (customers, for example), one customer 
retains the entire transaction history for the two original customers. In other words, 
you don’t so much merge two customers as turn one customer’s records into those 
of another. If you want to merge two customers’ records into one, the secret is to 
rename one customer to the same name as another. Likewise, if you want to merge 
two jobs’ or vendors’ records into one, you rename one vendor to the same name 
as another.
 NOTE 
There’s a catch to renaming customers: The customer you rename can’t have any jobs associated with 
it. So if there are jobs associated with the customer you want to rename, you have to move all those jobs to the 
customer you intend to keep 
before
you start the merge. Your best bet: Subsume the customer with fewer jobs 
so you don’t have to move very many. (If you don’t use jobs, then subsume whichever customer you want.)
CHAPteR 4: SETTING UP CUSTOMERS, JOBS, AND VENDORS
89
WORKING WITH 
CUSTOMERS, 
JOBS, AND  
VENDORS
To merge customer, job, or vendor records with a minimum of frustrated outbursts, 
follow these steps:
1. If you work in multi-user mode, switch to single-user mode for the duration 
of the merging operation.
See page 497 to learn how to switch to single-user mode and back again after 
the merge is complete.
2. Open the Customer Center or Vendor Center.
To open the Customer Center, in the Customers panel of the Home page, click 
Customers. To open the Vendor Center, in the Home page’s Vendors panel, 
click Vendors.
3. If you’re going to subsume a customer that has jobs associated with it, on 
the Customers & Jobs tab, position your cursor over the diamond to the left 
of the job you want to reassign. If you’re merging jobs or vendors instead, 
jump to step 6.
Jobs are indented beneath the customer to which they belong.
4. When your cursor changes to a four-headed arrow, drag the job under the 
customer you plan to keep, as shown in Figure 4-10, left.
As you drag, the cursor changes to a horizontal line between two arrowheads.
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for each job that belongs to the customer you’re go-
ing to subsume.
If you have hundreds of jobs for the customer, moving them is tedious at best—
but move them you must.
6. For a customer or job, on the Customers & Jobs tab, right-click the name 
of the customer or job you want to subsume and, from the shortcut menu, 
choose Edit Customer:Job. For a vendor, on the Vendors tab, right-click 
the name of the vendor you want to subsume and, from the shortcut menu, 
choose Edit Vendor.
You can also edit a record by selecting its name on the Customers & Jobs or 
Vendors tab and then, on the right side of the Customer or Vendor center, clicking 
the Edit button (the pencil icon). Depending on the type of record you selected, 
the Edit Customer, Edit Job, or Edit Vendor dialog box opens.
7. In the edit dialog box, edit the Customer Name, Job Name, or Vendor Name 
field to match the name of the record you intend to keep, and then click OK.
QuickBooks displays a message letting you know that the name is in use and 
asking if you want to merge the records.
8. Click Yes to complete the merge.
In the Customer or Vendor Center, the record you renamed disappears and any 
balances it had now belong to the remaining entry, as shown in Figure 4-10, right.
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
90
MANAGING 
LEADS
FiGURE 4-10
Left: When your cursor 
changes to a four-headed 
arrow, drag within the 
Customers & Jobs tab to 
move the job. As you drag, 
a horizontal line between 
two arrowheads shows 
you where the job will 
go when you release the 
mouse button.
Right: After reassigning all 
the jobs to the customer 
you intend to keep, you 
can merge the now-
jobless customer into the 
other. When the merge is 
complete, you see only the 
customer you kept.
Managing Leads
Suppose you attend a tradeshow and return to your office with a stack of leads. If 
you want to turn those leads into new sales, you usually have a host of to-dos, like 
following up on the questions that prospects asked, sending out more info about 
your products and services, or simply taking the next step in your sales process. 
The information you collect about leads is similar to that for customers, but leads 
aren’t customers—yet. If your lead-tracking needs are simple, the Lead Center can 
help you track prospects while you’re trying to turn them into customers. Then, if 
your persuasion pays off, you can transform leads into customers in QuickBooks.
To work with leads, open the Lead Center by choosing Customers→Lead Center. The 
Lead Center looks a lot like the Customer Center with a few exceptions. The Leads 
list on the left shows the lead’s name and status. And because leads don’t have 
transactions, the tabs at the bottom of the Lead Center focus on to-dos, contacts, 
locations, and notes you can use to try to convert the leads into customers.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested