c# display pdf in winform : Add a page to a pdf online software Library dll winforms asp.net wpf web forms QuickBooks_2014_The_Missing_Manual41-part619

CHAPteR 14: BANK ACCOUNTS AND CREDIT CARDS
381
RECONCILING 
ACCOUNTS
5. Click Reconcile Now to complete the mini-reconciliation.
The next time you reconcile the account, the beginning balance will match the 
beginning balance on your bank statement.
OTHER WAYS TO FIND DISCREPANCIES
Sometimes, your QuickBooks records don’t match your bank’s records because of 
subtle errors in transactions or because you’ve missed something in the current 
reconciliation. Try the following techniques to help spot problems:
• Search for a transaction equal to the amount of the discrepancy. Press Ctrl+F 
to open the Find window. On the Advanced tab, in the Choose Filter list, select 
Amount. Next, choose the = option and type the amount in the text box, and 
then click Find to run the search.
You can also use the Search feature to find a transaction for that amount: Press 
F3 to open the Search window. In the Amount box, type the amount of the 
discrepancy, and then click Go.
 NOTE 
Using Find or Search in this way works only if the discrepancy is caused by 
one
transaction that you 
cleared or uncleared by mistake. If more than one transaction is to blame, the amount you’re trying to find is the 
total of 
all
the erroneously cleared transactions, so these methods won’t find a matching value.
• Look for transactions cleared or uncleared by mistake. Sometimes, the easi-
est way to find a discrepancy is to start the reconciliation over. In the Reconcile 
window, click Unmark All to remove the checkmarks from all the transactions. 
Then begin checking them off as you compare them with your bank statement. 
Make sure that every transaction on the statement is cleared in the Reconcile 
window, and that no 
additional
transactions are cleared in that window.
• Look for duplicate transactions. If you create transactions in QuickBooks 
and
download transactions from your bank’s website, it’s easy to end up with 
duplicates. And when you clear both of the duplicates, the mistake is hard to 
spot. If that’s the case, you have to scroll through the register window looking 
for multiple transactions with the same date, payee, and amount.
• Compare the number of transactions on your bank statement with the 
number of cleared transactions on the left side of the Reconcile window 
(Figure 14-12). Of course, this technique won’t help if you enter transactions in 
QuickBooks differently than they appear on your bank statement. For example, 
if you deposit every payment individually but your bank shows one deposit for 
every business day, your transaction counts won’t match.
• Look for a deposit entered as a payment or vice versa. To find an error like 
this, look for transactions whose amounts are 
half
the discrepancy. For example, 
if a $500 check becomes a $500 deposit by mistake, your reconciliation will 
be off by $1,000: $500 because a check is missing and another $500 because 
you have an extra deposit.
Add a page to a pdf online - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page number to pdf document; add page numbers to pdf document in preview
Add a page to a pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page numbers pdf; add page numbers to pdf document
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
382
RECONCILING 
ACCOUNTS
FiGURE 14-12
As you clear transactions 
in the Reconcile window’s 
table, QuickBooks updates 
the number of items 
you’ve marked at the 
window’s bottom left, 
below the “Items you have 
marked cleared” label. 
Compare these numbers 
with the number of 
transactions on your bank 
statement. If the numbers 
don’t agree, you know to 
look for either a transac-
tion you didn’t clear or 
one that you cleared by 
mistake.
• Look at each cleared transaction for transposed numbers or other differ-
ences between your statement and QuickBooks. It’s easy to type 
$95.40
when you meant 
$59.40
.
 NOTE 
If these techniques don’t uncover the problem, your bank might have made a mistake. See page 383 
to learn what to do in that case.
Undoing the Last Reconciliation
If you’re having problems with this month’s reconciliation but suspect that the guilty 
party is hiding in 
last
month’s reconciliation, you can undo the last reconciliation and 
start over. When you undo a reconciliation, QuickBooks returns the transactions in 
it to an uncleared state.
In the Begin Reconciliation window (choose Banking→Reconcile), click Undo Last 
Reconciliation to open the Undo Previous Reconciliation dialog box. (Although the 
button’s label and the dialog box’s title don’t match, they both represent the same 
process.) In the dialog box, click Continue. When the Undo Previous Reconciliation 
message box appears telling you that the previous reconciliation has been success-
fully undone, click OK.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Access to freeware download and online VB.NET to provide users the most individualized PDF page image inserting function, allowing developers to add and insert
adding page numbers pdf; add page numbers to pdf in preview
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add page to pdf online; add page numbers to pdf in reader
CHAPteR 14: BANK ACCOUNTS AND CREDIT CARDS
383
MANAGING 
LOANS
QuickBooks unclears all the transactions back to the beginning of the previous rec-
onciliation and returns you to the Begin Reconciliation window. Change the values 
in the dialog box, and then click Continue to try another reconciliation.
 NOTE 
Although this process makes QuickBooks remove the cleared status from all the transactions included 
in your last reconciliation, including service charges and interest, the program 
doesn’t
remove the service charge 
and interest transactions that it added. So when you restart the reconciliation, don’t re-enter the service charges 
or interest in the Begin Reconciliation window.
When Your Bank Makes a Mistake
Banks do make mistakes: Digits get transposed or amounts are flat wrong. When this 
happens, you can’t ignore the difference. In QuickBooks, add an adjustment transac-
tion (page 376) to make up the difference, and be sure to tell your bank about the 
mistake. (It’s always a good idea to be polite in case the error turns out to be yours.)
When you receive your 
next
statement, check that the bank made an adjustment to 
correct its mistake. You can then delete your adjustment transaction or add a revers-
ing journal entry to remove your adjustment and reconcile as you normally would.
 TIP 
For a reminder to check your next statement, create a To Do Note (choose Company
To Do List, and 
then click Add To Do).
Managing Loans
Unless your business generates cash at an astonishing rate, you’ll probably have 
to borrow money to purchase big-ticket items that you can’t afford to do without, 
such as a deluxe cat-herding machine.
In real life, the asset you purchase and the loan you assume are intimately linked—you 
can’t get the equipment without borrowing the money. But in QuickBooks, loans 
and the assets they help purchase aren’t connected in any way. You create an asset 
account to track the purchase price of an asset that you buy. If you take out a loan 
to pay for that asset, you create a liability account to track the balance of what you 
owe on the loan. With each payment you make on the loan, you pay off a little bit 
of the loan’s principal as well as a chunk of interest.
 NOTE 
On your company’s balance sheet, the value of your assets appears in the Assets section, and the 
balance you owe on loans shows up in the Liabilities section. The difference between the asset value and the loan 
balance is your 
equity
in the asset. For example, suppose your cat-herding machine is in primo condition and is 
worth $70,000 on the open market. If you owe $50,000 on the loan, then your company has $20,000 in equity in 
that machine.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via password by using simple VB.NET demo code. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF.
add page to pdf without acrobat; add blank page to pdf preview
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in C#.NET
add page numbers to pdf; add page number to pdf in preview
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
384
MANAGING 
LOANS
Most loans 
amortize
your payoff, which means that each payment represents a 
different amount of interest and principal. At the beginning of a loan, amortized 
payments are mostly interest and very little principal; that means the lender gets 
more of its money up front, but it’s also great for your company’s tax deductions. 
By the end of the loan’s lifecycle, the payments are almost entirely principal. Mak-
ing loan payments in which the values change each month would be a nightmare 
if not for Loan Manager, a separate program that comes with QuickBooks that can 
exchange info with your company file. Loan Manager calculates your loan’s amortiza-
tion schedule, posts the principal and interest for each payment to the appropriate 
accounts, and handles escrow payments and fees associated with your loans. This 
section explains how to use Loan Manager.
 NOTE 
Loan Manager doesn’t handle loans in which the payment covers only the accrued interest (called 
interest-only loans
). For loans like these, you have to set up payments yourself (page 390) and allocate payments 
to principal and interest using the values on your monthly loan statement.
Setting Up a Loan
Regardless of whether you use Loan Manager, you have to create accounts in 
QuickBooks to keep track of your loan. You probably already know that you need 
a liability account for the amount of money you owe. And you also need accounts 
for the interest you pay on the loan and escrow payments (such as insurance or 
property tax) that you make. But if you’re planning to use Loan Manager to track 
your loan, make sure you have all of your loan-tracking elements in place 
before
you start using it. Here are the things you need:
• Liability account. Create a liability account (page 51) to track the money you’ve 
borrowed. For mortgages and other loans whose terms are longer than a year, 
use the Long Term Liability account type. For short-term loans (ones with terms 
of one year or less), use the Other Current Liability account type instead.
When you create the liability account, don’t enter an opening balance. The best 
way to record money you borrow is with a journal entry (see Chapter 16), which 
credits the liability account for the loan and debits either the bank account where 
you deposited the money or the fixed asset account for the asset you purchased.
 TIP 
If you’ve just started using QuickBooks and have a loan that you’ve partially paid off, fill in the journal 
entry with what you owed on the loan statement that’s dated just before your QuickBooks company file’s start 
date. Then enter any loan payments you’ve made since that statement’s ending date to get the account to the 
current balance.
• Loan interest account. The interest that you pay on loans is an expense, so 
create an Expense account (or an Other Expense account, if that’s the type of 
account your company uses for interest paid) called something like “Interest 
Paid.” (Loan Manager shows Other Expense accounts in its account drop-down 
lists, although it lists accounts in alphabetical order, not by type.)
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Please follow the sections below to learn more. DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add page number to pdf reader; adding page to pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add pages to pdf reader; add page numbers to pdf using preview
CHAPteR 14: BANK ACCOUNTS AND CREDIT CARDS
385
MANAGING 
LOANS
• Escrow account. If you make escrow payments for things like property taxes and 
insurance, create an account to track the escrow you’ve paid. Because escrow 
represents money you’ve paid in advance, use the Current Asset account type.
• Fees and finance charge expense account. Chances are you’ll pay some sort of 
fee or finance charge at some point before you pay off the loan. If you don’t have 
an account for finance charges you pay, set up an Expense account for them.
• The lender in your Vendor List (page 78). You also need a vendor record for the 
institution that lent you the money, so you can use it for the payments you make.
The box below tells you what to do if you forgot to perform any of these steps before 
starting Loan Manager. 
WORKAROUND WORKSHOP
Where Are My Accounts and Vendors?
Loan Manager looks just like any other item in QuickBooks’ 
Banking menu, but it’s actually a separate small program. 
When you start Loan Manager, it gleans information from 
your company file, such as the liability account you created 
for the loan and the vendor record you set up for your lender.
If you forgot to create accounts or your lender in QuickBooks 
before launching Loan Manager, you’ll probably jump to your 
Chart of Accounts window or Vendor List and create them. 
Although you create the elements you need by doing that, 
you 
still
won’t see them in Loan Manager’s drop-down lists. 
(That’s because Loan Manager grabs the info it needs from 
your company file when you first launch it.) To get them to 
appear, you have to close Loan Manager (losing all the data 
you’ve already entered) and create those entries in QuickBooks. 
Then, after you’ve created the vendor and all the accounts 
you need, choose Banking→Loan Manager to restart Loan 
Manager, which now includes your lender and loan accounts 
in its drop-down lists.
Adding a Loan to Loan Manager
Loan Manager makes it so easy to track and make payments on amortized loans 
that it’s well worth the steps required to set it up. Before you begin, gather your 
loan documents like chicks to a mother hen, because Loan Manager wants to know 
every detail of your loan, as you’ll soon see.
BASIC SETUP
Once you’ve created the necessary accounts and vendor records (see page 384), 
follow these steps to tell Loan Manager about your loan:
1. Choose BankingLoan Manager.
QuickBooks opens the Loan Manager window.
2. In the Loan Manager window, click the “Add a Loan” button.
QuickBooks opens the Add Loan dialog box, which has several screens for all 
the details of your loan. They’re all described in this section.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add a blank page to a pdf; add pages to pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings. On this page, we will talk about how to achieve this via Add necessary references
add pages to pdf file; adding page numbers in pdf
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
386
MANAGING 
LOANS
3. In the Account Name drop-down list, choose the liability account you cre-
ated for the loan.
QuickBooks lists only Current Liability and Long Term Liability accounts. After 
you choose the correct account, Loan Manager displays the account’s current 
balance.
 NOTE 
If Loan Manager shows the loan’s balance as zero, you aren’t off the hook for paying back the loan. 
Loan Manager grabs this balance from the QuickBooks liability account you created for the loan. The loan balance 
in Loan Manager is zero if you forgot to create a journal entry to set the liability account’s opening balance. To 
correct this, click the Add Loan dialog box’s Cancel button, and then close Loan Manager. In QuickBooks, create a 
journal entry to set the liability account’s opening balance, and then restart Loan Manager and set up the loan.
4. In the Lender drop-down list, choose the vendor you created for the com-
pany you’re borrowing money from.
If you haven’t set up the lender as a vendor in QuickBooks, you have to close Loan 
Manager. After you create the vendor in QuickBooks, choose Banking→Loan 
Manager to restart Loan Manager, which now includes the lender in its Lender 
drop-down list.
5. In the Origination Date box, choose the origination date on your loan docu-
ments.
Loan Manager uses this date to calculate the number of payments remaining, 
the interest you owe, and when you’ll pay off the loan.
6. In the Original Amount box, type the total amount you borrowed when you 
first took out the loan.
The Original Amount box is aptly named because it’s 
always
the amount that 
you originally borrowed. For new loans, the current balance on the loan and 
the Original Amount are the same. If you’ve paid off a portion of a loan, your 
current balance (shown below the Account Name box in Figure 14-13) is lower 
than the Original Amount. If the current balance is zero, you forgot to record 
the money you borrowed in the liability account (page 384).
7. In the Term boxes, specify the full length of the loan (such as 360 months 
or 30 years) and then click Next to advance to the screen where you enter 
payment information (explained next).
PAYMENT INFORMATION
When you specify a few details about your loan payments, Loan Manager can calcu-
late a payment schedule for you. And to make sure you don’t forget a loan payment 
(and incur outrageous late fees), you can tell Loan Manager to create a QuickBooks 
reminder for your payments. Here’s how:
1. In the “Due Date of Next Payment” box, choose the next payment date.
For a new loan, choose the date of the first payment you’ll make. For an exist-
ing loan, choose the next payment date, which usually appears on your last 
loan statement.
CHAPteR 14: BANK ACCOUNTS AND CREDIT CARDS
387
MANAGING 
LOANS
FiGURE 14-13
Loan Manager automatically selects 
Months in the Term drop-down list. 
Specifying the number of months for a 
30-year loan is a great refresher for your 
multiplication tables, but you don’t want 
to confuse Loan Manager by making an 
arithmetic error. 
If your loan’s term is measured in some-
thing other than months, in the Term 
drop-down list, choose the appropriate 
period (such as Years). Then you can fill in 
the Term box with the number of periods 
shown on your loan documents.
2. In the Payment Amount box, type the total amount of your next payment, 
including principal and interest.
Your payment amount is listed on your loan documents. Loan Manager auto-
matically puts 1 in the Next Payment Number box. For loans that you’ve made 
payments on already, replace this with the number of the next payment (this, 
too, should be on your last loan statement).
3. In the Payment Period drop-down list, choose the frequency of your 
payments.
Loans typically require monthly payments, even when their terms are in years, so 
Loan Manager automatically selects Monthly here. If your loan requires a different 
payment schedule, select the appropriate time period from this drop-down list.
4. If your loan includes an escrow payment, choose the Yes option, and then 
specify the amount of escrow you pay each time and the account to which 
you want to post the escrow, as shown in Figure 14-14.
5. If you want a reminder before a loan payment is due, leave the “Alert me 10 
days before a payment is due” checkbox turned on.
Loan Manager then tells QuickBooks when and how often payments are due, so 
QuickBooks can create a loan-payment reminder in its Reminders List (page 491). 
You can’t change the number of days before a payment is due for the reminder, 
but 10 days is usually enough to get your payment in on time.
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
388
MANAGING 
LOANS
FiGURE 14-14
Most mortgages include an escrow 
payment for property taxes and property 
insurance. (Escrow accounts are asset ac-
counts because you’re setting aside some 
money to pay expenses later.) 
When you add an escrow payment, Loan 
Manager updates the Total Payment value 
to include principal, interest, and escrow.
6. Click Next to advance to the screen for entering interest rate info (explained 
next).
INTEREST RATE INFORMATION
For Loan Manager to calculate your amortization schedule (the amount of principal 
and interest included with each payment), you have to specify the loan’s interest 
rate. Here’s how:
1. In the Interest Rate box, type the loan’s interest rate.
Use the rate that appears on your loan documents.
2. In the Compounding Period box, choose either Monthly or Exact Days, de-
pending on how the lender calculates compounding interest.
If the lender calculates the interest on your loan once a month, choose Monthly.
If the lender calculates interest using the annual interest rate divided over a 
fixed number of days in a year, choose Exact Days instead. When you do, Loan 
Manager activates the Compute Period box. In the past, many lenders simpli-
fied calculations by assuming that a year had 12 months of 30 days each; if 
your lender uses this method, choose 365/360 as the Compute Period. Today, 
lenders often use the number of days in a year; in that case, choose the 365/365 
Compute Period option instead.
3. In the Payment Account drop-down list, choose the account from which 
you make loan payments, whether you write checks or pay electronically.
Loan Manager includes all your bank accounts in this list.
CHAPteR 14: BANK ACCOUNTS AND CREDIT CARDS
389
MANAGING 
LOANS
4. In the Interest Expense Account drop-down list, choose the account you use 
to track interest you pay. In the Fees/Charges Expense Account drop-down 
list, choose the account you use for fees and late charges you pay.
Expense accounts and Other Expense accounts are comingled in these drop-
down lists, because they appear in alphabetical order, not sorted by type.
5. Click Finish.
Loan Manager calculates the payment schedule for the loan and adds it to its 
list of loans, shown in Figure 14-15.
FiGURE 14-15
When you select a loan 
in the Loan List table, 
the tabs at the bottom 
of the window display 
information about that 
loan. Most of the info on 
the Summary tab is stuff 
you entered, although 
Loan Manager does 
calculate the maturity 
date (the date when you’ll 
pay off the loan). The 
Payment Schedule tab 
(shown here) lists every 
payment and the amount 
of principal and interest 
each one represents. The 
info on the Contact Info 
tab comes directly from 
the lender’s vendor record 
in QuickBooks.
Modifying Loan Terms
Some loan characteristics change from time to time. For example, if you have an 
adjustable-rate mortgage, the interest rate changes every so often. And your escrow 
payment changes based on your property taxes and insurance premiums. To make 
changes like these, in the Loan Manager window (choose Banking→Loan Manager), 
select the loan, and then click Edit Loan Details.
Loan Manager takes you through the same series of screens you saw when you first 
added the loan (page 384). If you change the interest rate, the program recalculates 
your payment schedule. If you make a change in escrow, the program updates your 
payment to include the new escrow amount.
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
390
MANAGING 
LOANS
Setting Up Payments
You can set up a loan-payment check or bill in Loan Manager, which hands off the 
payment info to QuickBooks so the program can record it in your company file. 
Although Loan Manager can handle this task one payment at a time, it can’t create 
recurring payments to send the payment that’s due each month. When you see 
the QuickBooks reminder for your loan payment, you have to run Loan Manager to 
generate the payment, like so:
1. In the Loan Manager window (BankingLoan Manager), select the loan you 
want to pay and then click Set Up Payment.
Loan Manager opens the Set Up Payment dialog box and fills in the information 
for the next payment, as shown in Figure 14-16.
FiGURE 14-16
When you click Set Up Payment, 
Loan Manager fills in the Payment 
Information section of this dialog 
box with the principal and interest 
amounts from the loan payment 
schedule for the next payment 
that’s due. 
It also fills in the Payment 
Number box with the number of 
the next payment due.
 NOTE 
If you want to make an 
extra
payment, in the “This payment is” drop-down list, choose “An extra 
payment.” Because extra payments aren’t part of the loan’s payment schedule, Loan Manager changes the values 
in the Principal (P), Interest (I), Fees & Charges, and Escrow boxes to zero. If you want to prepay principal on your 
loan, type the amount that you want to prepay in the Principal (P) box. Or, if you want to pay an annual fee, fill 
in the Fees & Charges box.
2. In the “I want to” drop-down list at the bottom of the dialog box, choose 
“Write a check” or “Enter a bill,” and then click OK.
Loan Manager opens the QuickBooks Write Checks or Enter Bills window, re-
spectively, and fills in the boxes with the payment information. If you want, you 
can change the payment date or other values.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested