CHAPteR 15: DOING PAYROLL
431
PAYING 
YOURSELF
FiGURE 15-16
To recategorize a distribu-
tion as salary, you credit 
the Shareholder’s Distribu-
tion equity account and 
debit the salary expense 
account. The credit to the 
Shareholder’s Distribution 
equity account increases 
its balance (which de-
creased when you took the 
distribution), whereas the 
debit to the salary expense 
account shows your salary 
as an expense. The Payroll 
Tax Payable amount 
represents your employee 
portion of payroll tax 
withholdings.
RECLASSIFYING PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS
After you reclassify your shareholder’s distribution as salary, you still have to ac-
count for your payroll withholdings (such as the federal and state income taxes you 
pay) and other payroll taxes. When you remit payroll taxes to tax agencies like the 
IRS, you have to allocate them to the correct payroll accounts in your company file.
The journal entry in Figure 15-16 set your salary to $80,000. However, companies 
and employees split the bill for Social Security taxes and Medicare taxes. Because 
employees don’t know anything about remitting payroll tax withholdings, they let 
their employers include those withholdings in the employer’s payroll tax payments. 
The credit to the Payroll Tax Payable account in Figure 15-16 allocates part of your 
salary to your employee payroll tax withholdings so it appears in the Payroll Tax 
Payable current liability account.
When you remit payroll taxes, the amount you pay includes 
both
the employer 
payroll taxes and employees’ payroll tax withholdings. That’s why the IRS check in 
Figure 15-15 is split between two accounts. The line assigned to the Taxes-Payroll 
account represents the employer portion of federal payroll taxes (which includes 
the employer’s portion of Social Security and Medicare taxes, and the employer’s 
federal unemployment tax). The line for Payroll Tax Payable, on the other hand, 
represents the employees’ payroll tax withholdings (estimated federal income tax 
and the employees’ portion of Social Security and Medicare taxes).
Add page numbers to pdf files - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add pages to pdf without acrobat; adding page numbers to a pdf file
Add page numbers to pdf files - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
adding page numbers to pdf in; add page number to pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
them the ability to count the page numbers of generated metadata adding control, you can add some additional Create PDF Document from Existing Files Using C#.
add page numbers to pdf in reader; add a page to a pdf document
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated using this Word document adding control, you can add some additional Create Word From PDF.
add a page to a pdf online; adding page to pdf
433
CHAPTER
16
M
ost of the time, you don’t need to know double-entry accounting (page 
xxi) to use QuickBooks. When you write checks, receive payments, and 
perform many other tasks in QuickBooks, the program creates transactions 
that unobtrusively handle the double-entry accounting 
for
you. But every once in a 
while, these transactions can’t help, and your only choice is moving money around 
directly between accounts.
In the accounting world, these direct manipulations are known as 
journal entries
. For 
example, if you posted income to your only income account but have since decided 
that you need several income accounts to track the money you make, journal entries 
are the way to reclassify money in that original income account to the new ones. 
 TIP 
Although journal entries are the only solution for some tasks in QuickBooks, it’s best to use QuickBooks 
transactions instead whenever possible. By using transactions, your QuickBooks reports will contain all the info 
you expect, and you’ll have the financial details you need if the IRS starts asking questions.
The steps for creating a journal entry are deceptively easy; it’s assigning money to 
accounts 
in the correct way
that’s maddeningly difficult for weekend accountants. 
And unfortunately, QuickBooks doesn’t have any magic looking glass that makes 
these assignments crystal clear. This chapter gets you started by showing you how 
to create journal entries and providing examples of journal entries you’re likely to 
need. However, you’ll want to talk to your bookkeeper or accountant about the 
journal entries you need and the accounts to use in them.
Making Journal Entries
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
New PowerPoint File and Load PowerPoint from Other Files. them the ability to count the page numbers of generated creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add blank page to pdf preview; add a page to a pdf in acrobat
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
to Create New Word File and Load Word from Other Files. them the ability to count the page numbers of generated creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add page numbers to a pdf; add page numbers pdf
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
434
BALANCING 
DEBIT AND 
CREDIT 
AMOUNTS
 NOTE 
In the accounting world, you’ll hear the term “journal entry” and see it abbreviated JE. However, 
QuickBooks uses the term “
general
journal entry” and the corresponding abbreviation GJE. Don’t worry: Both 
terms and abbreviations refer to the same account register changes.
Balancing Debit and Credit Amounts
In double-entry accounting, both sides of any transaction have to balance, as the 
transaction in Figure 16-1 shows. When you move money between accounts, you 
increase the balance in one account and decrease the balance in the other—just as 
shaking some money out of your piggy bank decreases your savings balance and 
increases the money in your pocket. These changes in value are called 
debits
and 
credits
. (Whether the debit and credit increase or decrease the account balance 
depends on the type of account, as Table 16-1 shows.) If you commit anything about 
accounting to memory, it should be the definitions of debit and credit, because they’re 
the key to successful journal entries, accurate financial reports, and understanding 
what your accountant is talking about.
FiGURE 16-1
For each transaction, the 
total in the Debit column 
has to equal the total in 
the Credit column. 
To transfer money from 
one income account to 
another, you debit one 
account and credit the 
other. 
Table 16-1 shows what debits and credits do for different types of accounts and 
can take some of the pain out of creating journal entries. For example, buying a 
machine is a 
debit
to the equipment asset account because it increases the value 
of the equipment (assets) you own. A loan payment is a 
debit
to your loan account 
because it decreases your loan balance (a liability). And (here’s a real mind-bender) a 
credit card charge is a 
credit
to your credit card liability account because purchases 
on credit increase the amount you owe.
C# Excel - Excel Creating in C#.NET
to Create New Excel File and Load Excel from Other Files. them the ability to count the page numbers of generated creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add a blank page to a pdf; add page to pdf acrobat
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Codes to Sort TIFF File with .NET
to sort a multi-page TIFF file with page numbers using VB define the orders for the TIFF file page sorting by pageCount - 1 To 0 Step -1 newOrders.Add(i) Next
adding page numbers pdf file; add page number pdf
CHAPteR 16: MAKING JOURNAL ENTRIES
435
SOME 
REASONS TO 
USE JOURNAL 
ENTRIES
TABLE 16-1 
How debits and credits change the values in accounts
ACCOUNT TYPE
DEBIT
CREDIT
Asset
Increases balance
Decreases balance
Liability
Decreases balance
Increases balance
Equity
Decreases balance
Increases balance
Income
Decreases balance
Increases balance
Expense
Increases balance
Decreases balance
 NOTE 
One reason that debits and credits are confusing is that the words have the 
exact opposite
meanings 
when your bank uses them. In your personal banking, a debit to your bank account decreases its balance and a 
credit to that account increases its balance.
As you’ll see in examples in this chapter, you can have more than one debit or credit 
entry in one journal entry. For example, when you depreciate equipment, you can 
include a debit for the overall depreciation expense and a separate credit for the 
depreciation on each piece of equipment.
Some Reasons to Use Journal Entries
Here are a few of the more common reasons that businesses use journal entries:
• Setting up opening balances in accounts. You can fill in the opening balance 
for most of your balance sheet accounts with a single journal entry based on 
your trial balance from your previous accounting system. The box on page 439 
explains how.
• Reassigning accounts. As you work with QuickBooks, you might find that the 
accounts you originally created don’t track your business the way you want. 
For example, suppose you started with one income account for 
everything
you 
sell—services and products alike. But now you want two income accounts: one 
for income from services and another for income from product sales. To move 
income from your original account to the correct new account, you debit the 
income from the original account and credit it to the new account, as described 
on page 438.
• Correcting account assignments. If you assigned an expense to the wrong ac-
count, you or your accountant can create a journal entry to reassign the expense 
to the correct account. If you’ve developed a reputation for misassigning income 
and expenses, your accountant might ask you to assign any transactions you’re 
unsure about to an uncategorized income or expense account. That way, when 
she gets your company file at the end of the year, she can create journal entries 
to assign those transactions correctly. You can verify that the assignments and 
account balances are correct by running a Trial Balance report (page 452).
C#: Use XImage.OCR to Recognize MICR E-13B, OCR-A, OCR-B Fonts
may need to scan and get check characters like numbers and codes. page.RecSettings. LanguagesEnabled.Add(Language.Other); page.RecSettings.OtherLanguage
adding pages to a pdf document in preview; add page to pdf in preview
VB.NET Excel: VB Methods to Set and Customize Excel Rendering
treat every single Excel spreadsheet as a page in our An image consists of large numbers of dots, and the Our Excel converting add-on for VB.NET still supports
add page to pdf without acrobat; add page numbers to a pdf document
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
436
CREATING 
JOURNAL 
ENTRIES
• Reassigning jobs. If a customer hires you for several jobs, that customer might 
ask you to apply a payment, credit, or expense from one job to another. For 
example, if expenses come after one job is complete, your customer might want 
to apply them to the job still in progress. QuickBooks doesn’t have a feature 
specifically for transferring money between jobs, but a journal entry does the 
trick, as page 441 explains.
• Reassigning classes. If you use QuickBooks’ class feature, journal entries can 
transfer income or expenses from one class to another. For example, nonprofits 
often use classes to assign income to programs. If you need to reassign money 
to a different program, create a journal entry that has debit and credit entries 
for the same income account but changes the class (see page 438).
• Depreciating assets. Each year that you own a depreciable asset, you decrease 
its value in the appropriate asset account in your chart of accounts. Because 
no real cash changes hands, you use a journal entry to handle depreciation. As 
you’ll learn on page 442, a journal entry for depreciation debits the depreciation 
expense account (increasing its value) and credits the asset account (decreas-
ing its value).
• Recording transactions for a payroll service. If you use a third-party payroll 
service like Paychex or ADP, the payroll company sends you reports. You can 
then use journal entries to get the numbers from those reports into your com-
pany file where you need them. For example, you can reclassify some of your 
owners’ draw as salary and make other payroll-related transformations, as page 
430 explains in detail.
• Recording year-end transactions. The end of the year is a popular time for 
journal entries, whether your accountant is fixing your more creative transac-
tions or you’re creating journal entries for noncash transactions before you 
prepare your taxes. For example, if you run a small business out of your home, 
you might want to show a portion of your utility bills as expenses for your home 
office. When you create a journal entry for this transaction, you debit the office 
utilities account and credit an equity account for your owner’s contributions to 
the company.
Creating Journal Entries
In essence, every transaction you create in QuickBooks is a journal entry. For ex-
ample, when you write checks, the program balances the debits and credits behind 
the scenes. The Make General Journal Entries window is the answer when you want 
to 
explicitly
create journal entries in QuickBooks. Here are the basic steps:
1. Open the Make General Journal Entries window by choosing CompanyMake 
General Journal Entries.
Or, if the Chart of Accounts window is open, right-click anywhere in the window 
and then choose Make General Journal Entries on the shortcut menu, or click 
Activities→Make General Journal Entries.
C# Excel: Create and Draw Linear and 2D Barcodes on Excel Page
barcode image to the first page page.AddImage(barcodeImage C#.NET Excel Barcode Creating Add-on imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components
add remove pages from pdf; add page numbers to pdf document
VB.NET Image: Guide to Convert Images to Stream with DocImage SDK
Follow this guiding page to learn how to easily convert a single image or numbers of it an image processing component which can enable developers to add a wide
add pages to pdf; adding page to pdf in preview
CHAPteR 16: MAKING JOURNAL ENTRIES
437
CREATING 
JOURNAL 
ENTRIES
2. In the Make General Journal Entries window, choose the date you want as-
sociated with this journal entry.
If you’re creating a journal entry to reassign income or an expense to the cor-
rect account, use today’s date. However, when you or your accountant make 
end-of-year journal entries—to add the current year’s depreciation, say—it’s 
common to use the last day of the fiscal year instead.
 NOTE 
If you turn on QuickBooks’ multiple currency preference (page 659), the Make General Journal Entries 
window includes boxes for the currency and the exchange rate. If you select an account that uses a foreign currency 
in a journal-entry line, QuickBooks fills in the exchange rate and asks you to confirm that the rate is correct. If it 
isn’t, open the Currency List (choose Lists
Currency List) and update the exchange rate for that currency.
3. Although QuickBooks automatically assigns numbers to journal entries, you 
can specify a different number by typing it in the Entry No. box.
Entry numbers can contain letters, numbers, 
and
punctuation. When you type 
an entry number value that includes a number, QuickBooks fills in the Entry No. 
box for your 
next
journal entry by incrementing the one you typed. For example, 
suppose your accountant adds several journal entries at the end of the year and 
uses the numbers ACCT-1, ACCT-2, ACCT-3, and so on. When you begin using the 
file again, you can type a new number to restart your sequence, such as 
TRB-40 
or 40TRB
. When you create your next journal entry, QuickBooks automatically 
fills in the Entry No. box with TRB-41 or 41TRB, respectively.
 TIP 
If you don’t want QuickBooks to number journal entries automatically, you can turn off this feature in 
the Accounting preferences (page 641).
4. In the Account cell, choose the account that you want to debit or credit.
Every line of every journal entry has to have an account assigned. When you 
click the Account cell in the next line, QuickBooks automatically enters the 
offsetting balance, as shown in Figure 16-2.
5. If you want to debit the account you just selected, on the same line in the 
window’s table, type the amount in the Debit cell. To credit the account 
instead, type the amount in the Credit cell.
The first line of your journal entry can be either a debit or a credit. However, 
most accountants start journal entries with a debit.
6. Fill in the Memo cell with a brief description of the journal entry’s purpose.
Entering a memo is a huge help when you go back to review your journal entries. 
For example, if you’re reclassifying an uncategorized expense, type something 
like “Reclassify expense to correct account.” For depreciation, you can include 
the dates covered by the journal entry.
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
438
CREATING 
JOURNAL 
ENTRIES
FiGURE 16-2
The total in the Debit col-
umn has to match the total 
in the Credit column. So if 
the first line you enter is a 
debit, QuickBooks helpfully 
enters the same amount 
in the second line’s Credit 
column, as shown here. If 
your first line is a credit, 
QuickBooks puts the same 
amount in the second 
line’s Debit column.
 NOTE 
In QuickBooks Premier and Enterprise editions, the “Autofill memo in general journal entry” prefer-
ence tells the program to fill each subsequent Memo cell with the text from the first one. To adjust this setting, 
choose Edit→Preferences→Accounting, and then click the My Preferences tab.
7. If you’re debiting or crediting an AR or AP account, choose an option in the 
Name cell, as explained in the box on page 439.
You also fill in this cell if you’re creating a journal entry for billable expenses and 
want to assign the expenses to a customer or job. When you choose a name 
in this cell, QuickBooks automatically puts a checkmark in the “Billable?” cell, 
as shown in Figure 16-2, which reassigns some of your existing expenses to be 
billable to the customer or job. If you don’t want to make the value billable to 
the customer (for example, to assign expenses to a customer’s job to reflect its 
true profitability), then click the checkmark to turn it off.
8. If you use classes, choose a class for each line to keep your class reports 
accurate.
If you’re creating a journal entry to reassign income or expenses to a different 
class, select the same account on each line but different classes.
9. Repeat steps 4–8 to fill in the second line of the journal entry.
If the offsetting value that QuickBooks adds to the second line is what you 
want, all you have to do is choose the account for that line, fill in the other cells 
(if necessary), and then click Save & Close.
If the second line doesn’t balance the Debit and Credit columns, continue add-
ing additional lines until you’ve added debit and credit amounts that balance.
CHAPteR 16: MAKING JOURNAL ENTRIES
439
CREATING 
JOURNAL 
ENTRIES
10. When the debit and credit columns’ totals are the same, click Save & Close to 
save the journal entry and close the Make General Journal Entries window.
If you want to create another journal entry, click Save & New instead.
 TIP 
You can use QuickBooks’ Search and Find features to track down a journal entry. To use Search, choose 
Edit→Search (or press F3). In the Search window, click Transactions, and then click Journals. Finally, in the Search 
box at the top of the window, type keywords to search for. 
To use Find, choose Edit
Find (or press Ctrl+F) to open the Find window. Click the Simple tab. In the Transaction 
Type drop-down list, choose Journal. Then fill in other fields that identify the journal entry you’re looking for, such 
as the name, date, entry number, or amount. Finally, click Find to display journal entries that match your criteria.
WORKAROUND WORKSHOP
Creating Opening Balances with Journal Entries
QuickBooks has rules about Accounts Payable (AP) and Ac-
counts Receivable (AR) accounts in journal entries. Each journal 
entry can have only one AP or AR account, and that account 
can appear on only one line of the journal entry. And if you 
add an AP account, you also need to choose a vendor in the 
Name cell. (For AR accounts, you have to choose a 
customer’s
name in the Name cell.)
These rules are a problem only when you want to use journal 
entries to set the opening balances for customers or vendors. 
The hardship, therefore, is minute, because the preferred 
approach for building opening balances for vendors and 
customers is to enter bills and customer invoices. These 
transactions provide the details you need to resolve disputes, 
determine account status, and track income and expenses.
You can get around QuickBooks’ AP and AR limitations by set-
ting up the opening balances in all your accounts with a journal 
entry based on your trial balance (page 57) from your previous 
accounting system. Simply create the journal entry without 
the amounts for Accounts Payable and Accounts Receivable, 
as shown in Figure 16-3.
FiGURE 16-3
When you use journal entries 
to create opening balances, you 
have to adjust the values in your 
equity account (like retained 
earnings) to reflect the omission 
of AP and AR. Then you can create 
your open customer invoices and 
unpaid vendor bills to build the 
values for Accounts Receivable 
and Accounts Payable. 
When your AP and AR account 
balances match the values on the 
trial balance, the equity account 
will also match its trial balance 
value.
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
440
CHECKING 
JOURNAL 
ENTRIES
Checking Journal Entries
If you stare off into space and start mumbling, “Debit entries increase asset accounts” 
every time you create a journal entry, it’s wise to check that the journal entry did 
what you wanted. Those savvy in the ways of accounting can visualize debits and 
offsetting credits in their heads, but for novices, thinking about the changes you 
expect in your Profit & Loss report or balance sheet is easier.
For example, if you plan to create a journal entry to reassign expenses in the Uncat-
egorized Expenses account to their proper expense-account homes, you’d expect 
to see the value in the Uncategorized Expenses account drop to zero and the values 
in the correct expense accounts increase. Figure 16-4 shows how to use a Profit & 
Loss report (page 453) to check your journal entries.
FiGURE 16-4
Top: Before you create a 
journal entry, run a Profit 
& Loss report and look at 
the accounts that you ex-
pect to change. Here, the 
Uncategorized Expenses 
account has $20,000 
in it and the Employee 
Benefits account, which is 
the destination for your 
uncategorized expenses, 
has $3,600.
Bottom: After the journal 
entry reassigns the ex-
penses, refresh the report 
(page 664) in its report 
window to see the journal 
entry’s effect. Here, you 
can see that the Uncatego-
rized Expenses account’s 
balance decreased, as 
you’d expect, and the Em-
ployee Benefits account’s 
balance increased.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested