c# display pdf in winform : Adding page to pdf application SDK utility azure wpf winforms visual studio QuickBooks_2014_The_Missing_Manual47-part625

CHAPteR 16: MAKING JOURNAL ENTRIES
441
RE-
CLASSIFICATIONS 
AND 
CORRECTIONS
 NOTE 
Some journal entries affect both Balance Sheet and Profit & Loss reports. For example, as you’ll learn 
on page 442, a depreciation journal entry uses an asset account (which appears only in the Balance Sheet report) 
and an expense account (which appears only in the Profit & Loss report). In situations like this, you have to review 
both
reports to verify your numbers.
Reclassifications and Corrections
As you work with your QuickBooks file, you might realize that you want to use dif-
ferent accounts. For example, as you expand the services you provide, you might 
switch from one top-level income account to several specific income accounts. 
Expense accounts are also prone to change—like when the Home Office account 
splits into separate accounts for utilities, insurance, and repairs, for example. Any 
type of account is a candidate for restructuring, as one building grows into a stable 
of commercial properties, say, or you move from a single mortgage to a bevy of 
mortgages, notes, and loans. Whatever the situation, journal entries can help you 
put funds in the proper accounts.
Reclassifying Accounts
Whether you want to shift funds between accounts because you decide to catego-
rize your finances differently or you simply made a mistake, you’re moving money 
between accounts of the same type. The benefit to this type of journal entry is that 
you have to think hard about only 
one
side of the transaction—as long as you pick 
the debit or credit correctly, QuickBooks handles the other side for you.
The debits and credits you choose are the opposite for income and expense ac-
counts. For example, Figure 16-1 shows how to reclassify income, where you debit the 
original income account to decrease its value and credit the new income accounts 
to increase their value. Figure 16-5 shows how to reclassify expenses, in which you 
credit the original expense account to decrease its value and debit the new expense 
accounts to increase their value.
 TIP 
Accountants sometimes create what are known as 
reversing journal entries
, which are journal entries 
that move money in one direction on one date and then move the money back to where it came from on another 
date. Reversing journal entries are common at the end of the year, when you need your books configured one 
way to prepare your taxes and another way for your day-to-day bookkeeping. To create a reversing journal entry 
that uses the same accounts—but with opposite assignments for debits and credits—first, in the Make General 
Journal Entries window, display the journal entry you want to reverse. Then, at the top of the window, click the 
Reverse icon.
Reassigning Jobs
If you need to transfer money between different jobs for the same customer, journal 
entries are the answer. For example, a customer might ask you to apply a credit from 
one job to another because the job with the credit is already complete.
Adding page to pdf - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add and remove pages from a pdf; add and delete pages in pdf
Adding page to pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add or remove pages from pdf; add page numbers pdf files
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
442
RECORDING 
DEPRECIATION 
WITH JOURNAL  
ENTRIES
FiGURE 16-5
The debits and credits 
for expense accounts are 
the opposite of those for 
income accounts: You 
credit the original expense 
account to decrease its 
value and debit new ex-
pense accounts to increase 
their value.
When you move money between jobs, you’re transferring that money in and out of 
Accounts Receivable. Because QuickBooks allows only one AR account per journal 
entry, you need 
two
journal entries to transfer the credit completely. (Figure 10-34 
on page 274 shows what these journal entries look like.) You also need a special 
account to hold the credit transfers; an Other Expense account called something 
like “Clearing Account” will do. After you have the holding account in place, here’s 
how the two journal entries work:
• Transfer the credit from the first job to the holding account. In the first 
journal entry, debit Accounts Receivable for the amount of the credit. (Choose 
the customer and job in the Name cell.) This half of the journal entry removes 
the credit from the job’s balance. In the second line of the journal entry, choose 
the holding account. The amount is already in the Credit cell, which is where 
you want it for moving the amount into the holding account.
• Transfer the money from the holding account to the second job. In this journal 
entry, debit the holding account for the money you’re moving. Then the AR ac-
count receives the amount in its Credit cell. In the Name cell in the AR account 
line, choose the customer and the second job. This journal entry transfers the 
money from the holding account to the second job’s balance.
Recording Depreciation with Journal  
Entries
When you own an asset, such as the Deluxe Cat-o-matic Cat Herder, the machine 
loses value as it ages and clogs with fur balls. 
Depreciation
is an accounting concept, 
intimately tied to IRS rules, that reduces the value of the machine and lets your 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Perform annotation capabilities to mark, draw, and visualize objects on PDF document page. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program
adding page numbers to a pdf in preview; add a page to pdf file
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF document file page.
adding a page to a pdf; add pages to pdf in preview
CHAPteR 16: MAKING JOURNAL ENTRIES
443
RECORDING 
DEPRECIATION 
WITH JOURNAL  
ENTRIES
financial reports show a more accurate picture of how the money you spend on 
assets links to the income your company earns. (See the box on page 444 for an 
example of how depreciation works.)
Typically, you’ll calculate depreciation in a spreadsheet so you can also see the asset’s 
current depreciated value and how much more it will depreciate. But depreciation 
doesn’t deal with hard cash, which is why you need to create a journal entry to 
enter it. Unlike some other journal entries, which can use a wide range of accounts, 
depreciation journal entries are easy to create because the accounts you can choose 
are limited. Here’s how it works:
• The debit account is an expense account, usually called Depreciation Expense. 
(If you don’t have a Depreciation Expense account, see page 51 to learn how 
to create one.)
• The credit account is a fixed asset account called something like “Less Accu-
mulated Depreciation.” Figure 16-6 (top) shows how to set up your fixed asset 
accounts for things like machinery, vehicles, and furniture. You create a parent 
fixed asset account called Depreciable Assets, and then create separate fixed 
asset subaccounts within the Depreciable Assets account so you can see the 
total value of all your fixed assets on your balance sheet. The Accumulated 
Depreciation account (which you also create) appears after the depreciable 
asset accounts at the same level as the parent Depreciable Assets account, so 
you can see how much depreciation you’re deducting.
FiGURE 16-6
Top: A parent fixed asset 
account called Depreciable 
Assets acts as a container 
for all your fixed assets, so 
you can see the total fixed 
asset value on your balance 
sheet. The Accumulated 
Depreciation account follows 
the parent Depreciable 
Assets account, so you can 
see the depreciation you’ve 
deducted.
Bottom: If you have several 
assets to depreciate, the 
commonly accepted 
approach is to create a 
spreadsheet showing the de-
preciation for each individual 
asset. In QuickBooks, you 
simply record a single Depre-
ciation Expense debit for the 
total of 
all
 the depreciation 
credits, as shown here.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page modifying page, you will find detailed guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting
add pdf pages to word document; adding page numbers to a pdf document
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages to a PDF from a supported file format, with customized options.
add page break to pdf; add pages to pdf reader
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
444
RECORDING 
DEPRECIATION 
WITH JOURNAL  
ENTRIES
 TIP 
If you depreciate the same amount each year, memorize the first depreciation transaction you create 
(page 303). The following year, when it’s time to enter depreciation, press Ctrl+T to open the Memorized Transac-
tion List window. Select the depreciation transaction, and then click Enter Transaction.
Another way to copy a journal entry is to open the Make General Journal Entries window and then click Previous 
until you see the journal entry you want. Then right-click the window and choose Duplicate Journal Entry from 
the shortcut menu. Make the changes you want, and then click Save & Close.
For a depreciation journal entry, you want to reduce the value of the fixed asset 
account and add value to the Depreciation Expense account. If you remember that 
debit entries increase the value of expense accounts, you can figure out that the 
debit goes with the expense account and the credit goes to the fixed asset account. 
Figure 16-6 shows how depreciation debits and credits work.
UP TO SPEED
How Depreciation Works
When your company depreciates assets, you add dollars here, 
subtract dollars there—and none of the dollars are real. It 
sounds like funny money, but depreciation is an accounting 
concept that presents a more realistic picture of financial 
performance. To see how it works, here’s an example of what 
happens when a company depreciates a large purchase:
Suppose your company buys a Deep Thought supercomputer 
for $500,000. You spent $500,000, and you now own an asset 
worth $500,000. Your company’s balance sheet moves that 
money from your bank account to a fixed asset account, so 
your total assets remain the same.
The problem arises when you sell the computer, perhaps 10 
years later when it would make a fabulous boat anchor. If you 
don’t depreciate the computer, the moment you sell it, its 
value plummets from $500,000 to your selling price—$1,000, 
say. The decrease in value shows up as an expense, putting a 
huge dent in your profits for the 10th year. Shareholders don’t 
like it when profits change dramatically from year to year—up 
or
down. With depreciation, though, you can spread the cost 
of a big purchase over several years, which does a better job 
of matching expenses to the revenue generated by the asset. 
As a result, shareholders can see how well you use assets to 
generate income.
Depreciation calculations come in several flavors: straight-
line, sum of the years’ digits, and double declining balance. 
Straight-line depreciation is the easiest and most common. 
To calculate annual straight-line depreciation over the life of 
the asset, subtract the 
salvage
value (how much the asset will 
be worth when you sell it) from the purchase price, and then 
divide by the number of years of useful life, like so:
• Purchase price: $500,000
• Expected salvage value after 10 years: $1,000
• Useful life: the 10 years you expect to run the computer
• Annual depreciation: $499,000 divided by 10, which 
equals $49,900
Every year, you use the computer to make money for your 
business, and you show $49,900 as an equipment expense 
associated with that income. On your books, the value of the 
Deep Thought computer drops by another $49,900 each year, 
until the balance reaches the $1,000 salvage value at the end 
of the 10th year. This decrease in value each year keeps your 
balance sheet (page 459) more accurate and avoids the sudden 
drop in asset value in year 10.
The other methods—which are more complex—depreciate 
assets faster in the first few years (called 
accelerated deprecia-
tion
), making for big tax write-offs in a hurry. Page 442 explains 
how to record journal entries for depreciation, but your best 
bet is to ask your accountant how to post depreciation in your 
QuickBooks accounts.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
add page numbers to a pdf in preview; add pages to pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
VB.NET PDF - Insert Text to PDF Document in VB.NET. Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program.
add and delete pages from pdf; adding page numbers pdf
CHAPteR 16: MAKING JOURNAL ENTRIES
445
RECORDING 
OWNERS’ 
CONTRIBUTIONS
Recording Owners’ Contributions
Most attorneys suggest that you contribute some cash to get your company off the 
ground. However, you might make 
noncash
contributions to the company, like your 
home computer, printer, and other office equipment. Then, as you run your business 
from your home, you may want to allocate a portion of your mortgage interest, util-
ity bills, homeowners’ insurance premiums, home repairs, and other house-related 
expenses to your company. In both these situations, journal entries are the way to 
get money into the accounts in your chart of accounts.
 TIP 
If you write a personal check to jump-start your company’s checking account balance, simply record a 
deposit to your business checking account and assign that deposit to your owners’ equity account.
Recording Initial Noncash Contributions
When you contribute equipment to your company, you’ve already paid for the equip-
ment, so you want its value to show up in your company file. You can’t use the Write 
Checks window to make that transfer, but a journal entry can record that contribution:
• Credit the owners’ equity account (or common stock account, if your company 
is a corporation) with the value of the equipment you’re contributing to the 
company.
• Debit the equipment asset account so its balance shows the value of the equip-
ment that now belongs to the company.
Recording Home-Office Expenses
If you use a home office for your work, the money you spent on home-office ex-
penses is already out the door, but those expenditures are equivalent to personal 
funds you contribute to your business. If your company is a corporation, you credit 
your equity account with the amount of these home-office expenses. Here’s how 
you show this contribution in QuickBooks:
• Credit the total home-office expenses to an equity account for your sharehold-
ers’ distribution or owner’s contributions to the company.
• Debit the expense accounts for each type of home-office expense, as shown 
in Figure 16-7.
 TIP 
Another way to handle a home office is to charge your company rent for your office space. That way you, 
as the homeowner, have rental property, so you can depreciate the portion of your home rented to your company. 
(However, this depreciation complicates things down the road when you sell your home.) If your company is a 
corporation, it gets to take a tax deduction for rent on its corporate tax return.
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
text comments on PDF page using C# demo code in Visual Stuodio .NET class. C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide users with examples for adding text box
adding page numbers to a pdf in reader; add page number to pdf hyperlink
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# program. Perform annotation capabilities to mark, draw, and visualize objects on PDF document page.
add page number to pdf document; adding pages to a pdf
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
446
RECORDING 
OWNERS’ 
CONTRIBUTIONS
FiGURE 16-7
After you credit the owner’s contribu-
tion account and debit the home-office 
expense accounts, your home-office ex-
penses show up in the Profit & Loss report 
(page 453) and your owner’s contribution 
appears on the Balance Sheet (page 459).
If your business is a sole proprietorship, you handle home-office expenses differ-
ently: You write business checks to pay all your home expenses. When you do that, 
your Profit & Loss report shows your total home expenses as business expenses. 
But only a percentage of those expenses are business related, so you need a way 
to subtract the expenses that correspond to your personal use of your home. The 
solution? At the end of the year, create a journal entry to reallocate the personal 
percentage of home expenses to your owners’ draw equity account, so that only the 
business portion of your home expenses show up on the Profit & Loss report. Then 
you’ll have a section in your Profit & Loss report similar to Table 16-2.
CHAPteR 16: MAKING JOURNAL ENTRIES
447
RECORDING 
OWNERS’ 
CONTRIBUTIONS
TABLE 16-2 
Business expenses for a sole proprietorship
ACCOUNT
EXPENSE AMOUNT
Business Use of Residence
$17,800 (This is a summary account for the 
accounts starting with Mortgage Interest 
through Other Utilities)
Mortgage Interest
$9,000
Real Estate Taxes
$2,250
Real Estate Insurance
$750
Maintenance and Repairs
$2,400
Maintenance and Repairs Direct
$200
Other Utilities
$3,200
Less 80.0% Personal Use
$14,080
Residence Depreciation
$1,000
Total Business Use of Residence
$4,720
 NOTE 
The “Maintenance and Repairs Direct” line represents expenses 
directly
related to the home office, so 
the full amount goes toward the home-office expenses. Similarly, the Residence Depreciation line is the amount 
of depreciation for the portion of the house used as a home office.
449
CHAPTER
17
A
s if your typical workday isn’t hectic enough, the end of the year brings with 
it an assortment of additional bookkeeping and accounting tasks. As long as 
you’ve kept on top of your bookkeeping during the year, you can delegate 
most of these year-end tasks to QuickBooks with just a few clicks. (If you shrugged 
off your data entry during the year, even the mighty QuickBooks can’t help.) This 
chapter describes the tasks you have to perform at the end of each fiscal year (or 
other fiscal period, for that matter) and how to delegate them to QuickBooks. (The 
box on page 451 describes a QuickBooks feature that helps you 
remember
these 
various tasks.)
Checking for Problems
If you work with an accountant, you may never run a report from the 
Reports→Accountant & Taxes submenu unless your accountant asks you to. But if 
you prepare your own tax returns, running the following reports at the end of each 
year will help sniff out any problems:
• The Audit Trail report (Reports→Accountant & Taxes→Audit Trail) is especially 
important if several people work on your company file and transactions seem to 
disappear or change. QuickBooks’ audit trail feature is always turned on, keep-
ing track of changes to transactions, who makes them, and when. You can then 
check this permanent record by running the Audit Trail report—shown in Figure 
17-1—to watch for things like deleted invoices or modifications to transactions 
after they’ve been reconciled. (You have to be the QuickBooks administrator 
or have permission to generate sensitive financial reports to run this report.)
Performing Year-End  
Tasks
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
450
CHECKING FOR 
PROBLEMS
FiGURE 17-1
The Audit Trail report 
shows every transaction 
that’s been created, 
changed, or deleted. 
To see the details of a 
transaction, double-
click it.
People make mistakes, and this report is also good for spotting inadvertent 
changes to transactions. QuickBooks initially includes only transactions entered 
or modified today, but you can choose a different date range to review changes 
since your last review (in the Audit Trail report’s window, choose a date range 
in the Date Entered/Last Modified drop-down list, or type dates in the From 
and To boxes).
 NOTE 
QuickBooks’ Condense Data utility (page 516) removes the audit trail information for transactions 
that it deletes. So if you’re watching transaction activity, print an Audit Trail report before using Condense Data, 
and (as always), back up your company file regularly.
• The Voided/Deleted Transactions Summary and Voided/Deleted Transac-
tions Details reports focus on transactions that—you guessed it—have been 
voided or deleted. The reports list who made the changes or deletions and the 
dates and times they occurred.
 NOTE 
QuickBooks Accountant edition has a host of features that help accountants and bookkeepers spiff 
up your books at the end of the year. For example, the Client Data Review tool lists review and cleanup tasks to 
perform. If your accountant finds any issues, she can add notes about what she plans to do. And if you didn’t 
classify transactions correctly, your accountant can use the Reclassify Transactions features to correct classifications 
in a jiffy.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested