c# display pdf in winform : Add page numbers to pdf in reader SDK Library service wpf .net winforms dnn QuickBooks_2014_The_Missing_Manual49-part627

CHAPteR 17: PERFORMING YEAR-END TASKS 
461
GENERATING 
FINANCIAL 
REPORTS
Debt on its own isn’t bad; it’s 
too much
debt that can drag a company down, 
particularly when business is slow, since debt payments are due every month 
whether your business produced revenue or not.
• Equity. Equity on a balance sheet is the corporate counterpart of the equity 
you have in your house. When you buy a house, your initial equity is the down 
payment you make. But both the decreasing balance on your mortgage and 
any increase in the value of your house contribute to an increase in your equity. 
Equity in a company is the dollar value that remains after you subtract liabilities 
from assets. (Net income and retained earnings on your balance sheet change 
when you move into a new fiscal year. The box on page 462 describes what 
happens behind the scenes.)
GENERATING A BALANCE SHEET REPORT
A balance sheet is a snapshot of accounts on a given date. The various built-in 
Balance Sheet reports that QuickBooks offers differ in whether they show only 
account balances or all the transactions that make up those balances. Choose 
Reports→Company & Financial, and you can pick from any of the following reports:
• Balance Sheet Standard. This report includes every asset, liability, and equity 
account in your chart of accounts except for ones with zero balances, as shown 
in Figure 17-9. QuickBooks automatically sets the Dates box to “This Fiscal Year-
to-date” so the report shows your balance sheet for the current date. If you want 
to see the balance sheet for the end of a quarter or end of the year, in the Dates 
box, choose This Fiscal Quarter, This Fiscal Year, or Last Fiscal Year instead.
• Balance Sheet Detail. This report shows the transactions over a period in each 
of your asset, liability, and equity accounts. If a number on your Balance Sheet 
Standard report looks odd, use this report to verify your transactions. Double-
click a transaction’s value to open the corresponding window, such as Enter Bills.
• Balance Sheet Summary. If you want to see the key numbers in your balance 
sheet without scanning past the individual accounts in each section, this report 
shows subtotals for each category of a balance sheet, such as Checking/Savings, 
Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable, and so on.
• Balance Sheet Prev Year Comparison. If you want to compare your financial 
strength from year to year, this report has four columns at your service: one 
each for the current and previous years, one for the dollar-value change, and 
the fourth for the percentage change.
 NOTE 
When you review your Balance Sheet Prev Year Comparison report, you typically want to see decreasing 
liabilities. If liabilities have 
increased
, then assets should have increased as well, because you don’t want to see 
more debt without more assets to show for the trouble. Equity is the value of your—and your shareholders’, if 
you have them—ownership in the company, so it should increase each year. (If you use QuickBooks to keep the 
books for your one-person consulting company, the equity may not increase each year if, for example, you don’t 
have many company assets and you withdraw most of the profit you make as your salary.)
Add page numbers to pdf in reader - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page numbers to pdf preview; add page to pdf preview
Add page numbers to pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page number to pdf reader; adding page numbers to pdf in reader
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
462
GENERATING 
FINANCIAL 
REPORTS
• Balance Sheet by Class. This report lists your asset, liability, and equity ac-
counts, and includes a column for each class. However, to obtain accurate results 
from this report, you have to enter transactions in a specific way (for example, 
using only one class in each transaction, and recording transactions using 
QuickBooks features like Create Invoices and Receive Payments). To learn more 
about this report, search QuickBooks Help for “balance sheet by class report.”
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION
Net Income and Retained Earnings
I just changed the date on my Balance Sheet report from 
December 31 of last year to January 1 of this year, and the 
Net Income and Retained Earnings numbers are different. 
What’s the deal?
At the end of a fiscal year, account balances go through some 
changes to get your books ready for another year of commerce. 
For example, at the end of one fiscal year, your income and 
expense accounts show how much you earned and spent dur-
ing that year. But come January 1 (or whatever day your fiscal 
year starts), all those accounts have to be zero so you can start 
your new fiscal year fresh. QuickBooks makes this happen by 
adjusting your net income behind the scenes.
Say your net income on the Profit & Loss report is $23,100.51 on 
December 31, 2013 (see Figure 17-10). That number appears at 
the bottom of the Balance Sheet report as the value of the Net 
Income account (in the Equity section). At the beginning of the 
new fiscal year, QuickBooks automatically moves the previous 
year’s net income into the Retained Earnings equity account, 
which resets the Net Income account to zero.
Some companies like to keep equity for the current year sepa-
rate from the equity for all previous years. To do that, you need 
one additional equity account and one simple journal entry. 
Create an equity account (page 52) called something like Past 
Equity with an account number greater than the one you use for 
Retained Earnings. (For example, if Retained Earnings is 3900, 
set Past Equity to 3950.) Then, when you close your books at 
the end of the year, create a journal entry to move the current 
retained earnings value ($2,170.79 in this example) from the 
Retained Earnings account to the Past Equity account. That way, 
when QuickBooks moves the current year’s net income into the 
Retained Earnings equity account, you can see both current and 
past equity values, as shown in Figure 17-10.
The Statement of Cash Flows
Thanks to noncash accounting anomalies like accrual reporting and depreciation, 
Profit & Loss reports don’t tell you how much cash you have on hand. Looking at 
QuickBooks’ Statement of Cash Flows report helps you figure out whether your 
company generates enough cash to keep the doors open. Your balance sheet 
might look great—$10 million in assets and only $500,000 in liabilities, say—but if 
a $50,000 payment is due and you have only $3,000 in the bank, you have cash 
flow problems. (The box on page 465 describes ways to evaluate your cash flow.)
UNDERSTANDING THE STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
The concept of cash flow is easy to understand. In the words of every film-noir de-
tective, follow the money. Cash flow is nothing more than the real money that flows 
into and out of your company—not the noncash transactions, such as depreciation, 
that you see on a Profit & Loss report. Figure 17-11 shows sources of cash in a sample 
Statement of Cash Flows.
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
them the ability to count the page numbers of generated PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add page number pdf file; add and remove pages from a pdf
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated using this Word document adding control, you can add some additional Create Word From PDF.
add page numbers to pdf reader; add contents page to pdf
CHAPteR 17: PERFORMING YEAR-END TASKS 
463
GENERATING 
FINANCIAL 
REPORTS
FiGURE 17-10
When you close your 
books at the end of a 
fiscal year, you can create 
a journal entry to transfer 
the previous year’s 
retained earnings from the 
Retained Earnings account 
to the Past Equity account. 
Date the journal entry the 
last day of the fiscal year 
(like 12/31/13, as shown in 
the foreground here). You 
debit the Retained Earn-
ings account and credit the 
Past Equity account. 
The Balance Sheet report 
for the first day of the next 
fiscal year then includes 
the previous year’s 
retained earnings added 
to the Past Equity account 
and the previous year’s net 
income ($23,100.51 here) 
in the Retained Earnings 
account.
 WARNING 
Cash provided by operating activities shows how much money your day-to-day operations 
produce. When you sell an asset (which is an investing activity), it shows up as a gain or loss on the Profit & 
Loss report, which 
temporarily
increases or reduces your net income. Beware: The effect of investing activities 
on the Profit & Loss report can hide problems brewing in your operations, which is why you should examine the 
Statement of Cash Flows report. If your income derives mainly from investing and financing activities instead of 
operating activities, you’ve got a problem.
GENERATING A STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
To create a Statement of Cash Flows, QuickBooks automatically assigns the ac-
counts that appear in your company’s balance sheet to one of the three cash flow 
categories—operating, investing, or financing—and the program almost always gets 
those assignments right. For example, Accounts Receivable and Inventory appear 
as operating accounts, fixed asset accounts show up as investing, and accounts for 
loans fall under financing. Unless you’re a financial expert or your accountant gives 
you explicit instructions about a change, you’re better off leaving QuickBooks’ ac-
count classifications alone. If you need to reassign accounts for your Statement of 
Cash Flows report, this section tells you how.
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
file but also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated NET using this PowerPoint document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add page number to pdf document; adding page numbers to pdf in preview
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
document file but also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated using this Word document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add page number to pdf print; adding pages to a pdf
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
464
GENERATING 
FINANCIAL 
REPORTS
FiGURE 17-11
A Statement of Cash Flows report orga-
nizes transactions into various activity 
categories. 
Cash from 
operating activities
 is the most 
desirable; when a company’s ongoing 
operations generate cash, the business 
can sustain itself without cash coming 
from other sources. 
Buying and selling buildings or making 
money in the stock market by using 
company money are 
investing activities
Borrowing money or selling stock in your 
company brings in cash from outside 
sources, called 
financing activities
. (New 
companies often have no other source 
of cash.)
Generating a Statement of Cash Flows is easy because you have only one report to 
choose from. Simply choose Reports→Company & Financial→Statement of Cash 
Flows, and QuickBooks creates a report that displays your cash flow for your fiscal 
year to date. To view the Statement of Cash Flows report for a quarter or a year, in 
the Dates box, choose This Fiscal Quarter or This Fiscal Year , as shown in Figure 17-11.
 NOTE 
The Operating Activities section of the report includes the label “Adjustments to reconcile Net Income 
to net cash provided by operations.” If you’re wondering what that means in non-accounting language, QuickBooks 
calculates the net income at the top of the Statement of Cash Flows report on an 
accrual
basis (meaning income 
appears as of the invoice date, not the day the customer pays). But the Statement of Cash Flows is by nature a 
cash-based report, so the program has to add and subtract transactions to get net income on a 
cash
basis. (See 
page xxiii for more on the difference between cash-based and accrual-based accounting.)
The account assignments for the Statement of Cash Flows report are controlled by 
a collection of preferences you can find in the Preferences dialog box. Here’s how 
to view the account assignments or change them:
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Codes to Sort TIFF File with .NET
manipulating multi-page TIFF (Tagged Image File), PDF, Microsoft Office If you want to add barcode into a TIFF a multi-page TIFF file with page numbers using VB
adding page to pdf in preview; adding pages to a pdf document in preview
C# Excel: Create and Draw Linear and 2D Barcodes on Excel Page
can also load document like PDF, TIFF, Word get the first page BasePage page = doc.GetPage REImage barcodeImage = linearBarcode.ToImage(); // add barcode image
adding page numbers to pdf in; adding page numbers to a pdf file
CHAPteR 17: PERFORMING YEAR-END TASKS 
465
GENERATING 
FINANCIAL 
REPORTS
1. In the Statement of Cash Flows report window’s toolbar, click the Classify 
Cash button.
The Preferences dialog box opens to the Reports & Graphs section and 
selects the Company Preferences tab (as long as you have QuickBooks ad-
ministrator privileges, that is). You can also open this dialog box by choosing 
Edit→Preferences→Reports & Graphs.
2. In the Preferences dialog box, click the Classify Cash button.
QuickBooks opens the Classify Cash dialog box.
3. To change the category to which an account belongs, click the cell in the 
column for the new category.
If you made changes and fear you’ve mangled the settings beyond repair, click 
Default to reset the categories to the ones QuickBooks used initially. 
4. When the assignments are the way you want, click OK to close the dialog box.
That’s it—you’ve reassigned the accounts.
POWER USERS’ CLINIC
Expert Cash Flow Analysis
Thanks to today’s accounting rules, cash isn’t always connected 
to revenues and expenses. And a dollar in sales isn’t necessarily 
a dollar of cash. Here’s what financial analysts look for when 
they evaluate a company’s health based on its statement of 
cash flows:
• Net income that’s close to the cash from operating 
activities means net income is mostly from business 
operations and the company can support itself.
• Cash from operations that’s growing at the same rate or 
faster than the growth of net income indicates that the 
company is maintaining—or even improving—its ability 
to sustain business.
• Cash that’s increasing means the company won’t have 
to resort to financing to keep the business going. 
• Negative cash flow is often the sign of a rapidly growing 
company—without financing, the company grows only 
as fast as it can generate cash from operations. If a 
company isn’t growing quickly and 
still
can’t generate 
cash, something’s wrong.
• If an increase in cash comes primarily from selling assets, 
the company’s future looks grim. Selling assets to raise 
cash sometimes means the company can’t borrow any 
more because banks don’t like what they see. Because 
assets often produce sales, selling assets means less 
cash generated in the future—and you can see where 
that leads.
Other Helpful Financial Reports
Although financial statements are the ones that people like shareholders and the 
IRS want to see, other financial reports help you, the business owner, keep tabs on 
how your enterprise is doing. Here are a few QuickBooks reports that can help you 
evaluate your business’s performance:
VB.NET Image: Guide to Convert Images to Stream with DocImage SDK
Follow this guiding page to learn how to easily convert a single image or numbers of it an image processing component which can enable developers to add a wide
add page numbers pdf file; adding page numbers to a pdf document
C# Excel - Excel Creating in C#.NET
document file but also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated using this Excel document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add remove pages from pdf; adding page numbers to pdf in reader
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
466
GENERATING 
FINANCIAL 
REPORTS
 NOTE 
Reports that apply to specific bookkeeping and accounting tasks are explained in the chapters about 
those tasks, such as Accounts Receivable reports in Chapter 13.
• Reviewing income and sales. If you’re introducing enhanced services to 
keep your best customers—or you’re looking for the customers you 
want
your competition to steal—use the Income by Customer Summary report 
(Reports→Company & Financial→Income by Customer Summary). It shows 
total income for each of your customers; that is, the total dollar amount from all 
your income and expense accounts associated with each customer. Customers 
with low income totals might be good targets for more energetic sales pitches. 
If you find that most of your income comes from only a few customers, you may 
want to protect your income stream by lining up more customers. (One thing 
this report 
doesn’t
show is how profitable your sales to customers are; the box 
on page 456 explains how to see that.)
 TIP 
If you want to produce a report showing performance over several years to evaluate trends, you can set 
a report’s date range to include the years you want to compare. Then modify the report as explained on page 
598 to include columns for each year.
• Reviewing expenses. On the expense side, the Expenses by Vendor Summary 
report (Reports→Company & Financial→Expenses by Vendor Summary) shows 
how much you spend with each vendor. If you spend tons with certain vendors, 
maybe it’s time to negotiate volume discounts, find additional vendors as back-
ups, or set up electronic ordering to speed up deliveries.
• Comparing income and expenses. The Income & Expense Graph (Reports→ 
Company & Financial→Income & Expense Graph) includes a bar graph that 
shows income and expenses by month and a pie chart that breaks down either 
income or expenses (click Income or Expense at the bottom of the report’s 
window to choose which pie chart is displayed). To specify how you want Quick-
Books to display your income or expenses, click By Account, By Customer, or 
By Class in the window’s icon bar. You can’t change the time periods for each 
set of bars on the graph.
• What you’ve sold. Most companies analyze their sales to find ways to improve. 
Maybe you want to beef up sales to customers who haven’t bought from you 
in a while, turn good customers into great ones, or check how well your stuff 
is selling. The Sales by Customer Summary report (Reports→Sales→Sales by 
Customer Summary) is a terse listing of customers and how much you’ve sold 
to each one during the timeframe you specify; it initially shows “This Month-
to-date” figures.
The Sales Graph (Reports→Sales→Sales Graph), on the other hand, presents 
sales data in a cheery rainbow of colors, and you can quickly switch the graph 
to show the breakdown of sales by customer, item, or sales rep. The bar graph 
shows sales by month for the year to date. If you want to change the duration 
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
are also available within C# Word Printer Add-on , like pages at one paper, setting the page copy numbers to be C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of Word.
add page numbers to pdf in preview; add blank page to pdf preview
C#: Use XImage.OCR to Recognize MICR E-13B, OCR-A, OCR-B Fonts
may need to scan and get check characters like numbers and codes. page.RecSettings. LanguagesEnabled.Add(Language.Other); page.RecSettings.OtherLanguage
add pages to an existing pdf; add pages to pdf without acrobat
CHAPteR 17: PERFORMING YEAR-END TASKS 
467
GENERATING 
TAX REPORTS
covered by the graph, click Dates and then specify the date range you want. The 
pie chart shows sales slices based on the category you choose: In the window’s 
toolbar, click By Item, By Customer, or By Rep.
The Sales by Item Summary report (Reports→Sales→Sales by Item Summary) 
shows how much you sell of each item in your Item List, starting with inventory 
items, followed by Non-inventory Parts, Service items, and finally Other Charge 
items. This report also includes columns for average cost of goods sold (COGS) 
and gross margin, which apply only to inventory items you sell.
• Forecasting cash flow. Say you’re wondering whether you have any invoices due 
that will cover a big credit card bill that’s coming up, or whether income over the 
next few weeks is enough to meet payroll. At times like that, use the Cash Flow 
Forecast report (Reports→Company & Financial→Cash Flow Forecast) to see 
how much cash you should have over the next four weeks, as shown in Figure 
17-12. The Beginning Balance row shows the current balance for your Accounts 
Receivable, Accounts Payable, and bank accounts. The Proj Balance column 
shows how much money you should have in your bank accounts at the end of 
each week (or longer if you choose a different period in the Periods drop-down 
list). If a number in that column starts flirting with zero, you’re about to run out 
of cash. You’ll have to speed up some customer payments, transfer cash from 
another account, or look into a short-term loan.
FiGURE 17-12
To view more than four 
weeks, type the date range 
you want in the From and 
To boxes or, in the Dates 
drop-down list, choose 
Next Fiscal Quarter or Next 
Fiscal Year. To change the 
length of each period in 
the report, in the Periods 
drop-down list, choose 
from Week, Two Weeks, 
Month, and so on.
Generating Tax Reports
Whether your accountant has the honor of preparing your taxes or you keep that 
excitement for yourself, you can save accountant’s fees and your own sanity by 
making sure your company file is ready for tax season. The key to a smooth transi-
tion from QuickBooks to tax preparation is linking each account in your chart of 
accounts to the correct tax line and tax form. (The box on page 468 describes 
another tax-preparation task.)
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
468
GENERATING 
TAX REPORTS
POWER USERS’ CLINIC
Realized Gains and Losses
If you work with more than one currency (page 659), changes 
in exchange rates can lead to gains or losses on your transac-
tions. Say you send a customer an invoice for €1,000 when the 
euro-to-dollar exchange rate is 1.459 (that is, 1 euro equals 
1.459 dollars). The invoice total in your home currency (dollars, 
in this example) is $1,459. However, by the time you deposit 
the customer’s payment, the euro-to-dollar exchange rate is 
1.325, which means each euro is worth fewer dollars. At that 
exchange rate, your bank records a deposit of $1,325 in your 
account, and you’ve lost $134 on the transaction.
To see how much you’ve gained or lost on foreign currency trans-
actions, choose Reports→Company & Financial→Realized 
Gains & Losses. To see 
potential
gains or losses based on 
the latest exchange rate, choose Reports→Company & 
Financial→Unrealized Gains & Losses. In the Enter Exchange 
Rates dialog box, type the exchange rates you want to ap-
ply. When you click Continue, the Unrealized Gains & Losses 
report shows gains and losses for the balances in your AR 
and AP accounts.
To report your financial results accurately, you have to adjust 
the value of accounts set up in foreign currencies (page 56) 
based on the exchange rate as of the end date for the report. 
You can download the most recent exchange rates by choosing 
Company→Manage Currency→Download Latest Exchange 
Rates. Or, to find exchange rates for a given date, point your 
web browser to 
www.xe.com/ict
. Then, in QuickBooks, you can 
choose Lists→Currency List and edit the currencies to reflect 
the exchange rates you found online.
To adjust account values, choose Company→Manage 
Currency→Home Currency Adjustment. In the Home Currency 
Adjustment window, select the date for the adjustment, and 
then pick the currency and the exchange rate you want to use. 
Click Calculate Adjustment, and customers and vendors who 
use that currency appear in the window’s table. Select the ones 
you want to adjust, and then click Save & Close.
Reviewing the Income Tax Preparation report (Reports→Accountant & Taxes→Income 
Tax Preparation) can not only save you money on accountant’s fees, but it can also 
prevent IRS penalties (as well as keep more of your hair attached to your scalp). As 
shown in Figure 17-13, this report lists the accounts in your chart of accounts and 
the tax lines to which you assigned them. If an account isn’t linked to the correct 
tax line—or worse, not assigned to 
any
tax line—the Income Tax Summary report 
(described in a sec), which lists each line on your tax return with the amount you 
have to report, won’t display the correct values. See page 56 to learn more about 
choosing tax lines for accounts.
When all the accounts in your chart of accounts are assigned to tax lines, you can 
generate a report with all the values you need for your company’s tax return. Choose 
Reports→Accountant & Taxes→Income Tax Summary. Because you usually run this 
report after the fiscal year ends and all the numbers are in, QuickBooks automati-
cally fills in the Dates box with Last Tax Year.
 NOTE 
As one last reminder of unassigned accounts, the last two lines of the Income Tax Summary report 
are “Tax Line Unassigned (balance sheet)” and “Tax Line Unassigned (income/expense).” To see the transactions 
that make up either of these unassigned values, double-click the number in the corresponding line.
CHAPteR 17: PERFORMING YEAR-END TASKS 
469
GENERATING 
TAX REPORTS
FiGURE 17-13
If you see “<Unassigned>” in 
the Tax Line column, you’ll 
have to assign a tax line to that 
account. (The easiest way to 
identify the correct tax line is to 
ask your accountant or tax pro-
fessional.) To edit an account, 
press Ctrl+A to display the Chart 
of Accounts window. Select the 
account, and then press Ctrl+E to 
open the Edit Account window. 
In the Tax Line Mapping drop-
down list, choose the tax form 
and line for that account.
UP TO SPEED
Year-End Journal Entries
Journal entries run rampant at the end of the year. If your 
accountant makes journal entries for you or gives you instruc-
tions, you might be perfectly happy not knowing what these 
journal entries do. But if you go it alone, you need to know 
which journal entries to make.
For example, if you purchase fixed assets, you need to create 
a journal entry to handle depreciation. You might also create 
journal entries to record home-office expenses as owners’ 
contributions to your company.
If you aren’t an accounting expert, don’t waste precious time 
trying to figure out your journal entry needs; the cost of 
an accountant’s or tax professional’s services is piddling in 
comparison. Chapter 16 covers some of the journal entries you 
might need and explains how to create them.
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
470
SHARING A 
COMPANY FILE 
WITH YOUR  
ACCOUNTANT
Sharing a Company File with Your  
Accountant
If you work with an accountant who uses QuickBooks, there are times when a tug-of-
war over your company file is inevitable. You want to perform your day-to-day book-
keeping, but your accountant wants to review your books, correct mistakes you’ve 
made, enter journal entries to prepare your books for end-of-quarter or end-of-year 
reports, and so on. QuickBooks has two ways for you and your accountant to share:
• With an accountant’s review copy, the two of you can stop squabbling because 
you each get your own copy of the company file. That way you can work on 
everyday bookkeeping tasks while your accountant tackles cleaning up earlier 
periods.
• The external accountant user is a superpowered user who can look at anything 
in your company file—except sensitive customer information like credit card 
numbers. You set up an external accountant user in your company file for your 
accountant so he can log into your file, review every nook and cranny of your 
company’s data (with QuickBooks’ Client Data Review tool, which is designed 
specifically for accountants), make changes, and keep track of which changes 
are his and which are yours.
This section explains both of these approaches.
Creating an Accountant’s Review Copy
The secret to an accountant’s review copy is a cutoff date that QuickBooks calls the 
dividing date
. Transactions before this date are fair game for your accountant, who 
can work on the accountant’s review copy in the comfort of his own office. Transac-
tions after that date are under your command in your original company file. When 
your accountant sends a file with changes back to you, QuickBooks makes short 
work of merging his changes into your company file. The box on page 471 describes 
other ways you can collaborate with your accountant.
You have to be in single-user mode to create an accountant’s copy. To switch to 
single-user mode, first make sure that everyone else is logged out of the company 
file, and then choose File“Switch to Single-user Mode.” After that, creating an ac-
countant’s review copy is a lot like creating other kinds of copies of your company file:
 TIP 
If you have a few dozen windows open and laid out just the way you want, there’s no need to gnash your 
teeth as QuickBooks closes all your windows to create the accountant’s copy. 
Before
you create the accountant’s 
copy, save the current window arrangement so the program can reopen all those windows for you: Simply choose 
Edit→Preferences→Desktop View. On the My Preferences tab, choose the “Save current desktop” option, and 
then click OK to close the Preferences dialog box.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested