c# display pdf in winform : Adding pages to a pdf document in preview SDK control API .net azure asp.net sharepoint QuickBooks_2014_The_Missing_Manual7-part650

CHAPteR 2: GETTING AROUND IN QUICKBOOKS
41
THE HOME 
PAGE
Employees
The Home page’s Employees panel has only a few icons. The devilish details arise 
when you click one of these icons to enter time, set up paychecks, or pay payroll tax 
liabilities. The Employee Center works the same way as the Vendor and Customer 
centers you just learned about. To open it, click the Employees button at the top of 
the panel on the Home page or choose Employees→Employee Center. 
In the Employee Center, you can create new records for employees, update info for 
existing employees, and view transactions like paychecks. On the Employees tab on 
the left side of the center, you can filter the list to view active employees, released 
employees (ones who no longer work for you), or all employees. See Chapter 8 to 
learn how to record the time that employees work. Chapter 15 covers the process 
for paying employees and other payroll expenses.
Company Features
The Company panel is on the right side of the Home page. The two icons in this panel 
that you’ll probably click most often are Chart of Accounts and Items & Services, 
which open the Chart of Accounts (page 51) and Item List (page 102) windows, 
respectively. Click Calendar to review transactions and to-dos in the Calendar 
window (page 494).
If you’re interested in other apps and services that Intuit has to offer, click the “Web 
and Mobile Apps” icon; a browser window opens to the QuickBooks App Center. If 
you track inventory, click the Inventory Activities icon and then choose a feature, 
such as Adjust Quantity/Value On Hand, which lets you change the quantity and 
value of your inventory (page 548). If you use QuickBooks Premier or Enterprise, 
click Inventory Center to open a window similar to the Customer Center, except 
that it focuses on the status of—and transactions involving—your inventory items 
(page 544).
Banking
The Home page’s Banking panel is a one-stop shop for banking tasks. Whether you 
visit this panel frequently or rarely depends on how you like to record transactions. 
For example, you can click the Write Checks icon to open the Write Checks window 
(page 193) or simply press Ctrl+W to do the same thing. (Or, if you like to record 
checks in a check register window, you might prefer to double-click your bank ac-
count in the Chart of Accounts window instead.) Similarly, clicking the Enter Credit 
Card Charges icon opens the Enter Credit Card Charges window (page 203), though 
you can also record credit card charges directly in a credit card account’s register 
(page 356).
Clicking the Record Deposits icon opens the “Payments to Deposit” window so you 
can record bank deposits (page 349). The Reconcile icon opens the Begin Recon-
ciliation dialog box so you can reconcile your QuickBooks records to your bank’s 
(page 371). And the Print Checks icon opens the “Select Checks to Print” dialog box 
so you can choose the ones you want to print and send them to a printer loaded 
with blank checks.
Adding pages to a pdf document in preview - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page number pdf; adding page to pdf in preview
Adding pages to a pdf document in preview - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page numbers pdf files; adding a page to a pdf in reader
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
42
THE COMPANY 
SNAPSHOT
 NOTE 
If you use the top icon bar (View→Top Icon Bar), the top-right part of the Home page shows account 
balances. Below those is a Do More with QuickBooks section with a few links to additional services that Intuit 
offers. You also see a Backup Status section that tells you when your last backup ran and includes info about 
the Intuit Data Protect backup service (page 504). If any of these sections are collapsed, click the section’s down 
arrow to expand it. Click a section’s up arrow to collapse it.
If you use the left icon bar (View→Left Icon Bar), you can see account balances by clicking View Balances in the 
bar’s middle section. (See page 30 for more about the icon bars.)
The Company Snapshot
The Company Snapshot window (Figure 2-8) is a dashboard that shows important 
aspects of your company’s financial state, like account balances, income breakdown 
(by top-level income accounts), customers who owe you money, best-selling items, 
and reminders. Choose Company→Company Snapshot or click the Snapshots icon 
in either icon bar to open it. You can choose from 12 different views (page 709) to 
see the information you care most about.
FiGURE 2-8
Not only can you quickly 
scan your company’s 
financial status in this 
window, but you can also 
double-click entries here 
to dig into the details. 
You can even add or 
remove items from this 
window or drag items 
to rearrange them, as 
described on page 709.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add page to a pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
adding page numbers to pdf in preview; adding pages to a pdf document
43
CHAPTER
3
I
f you’ve just started running a business and keeping your company’s books, all 
this talk of accounts, credits, and debits might have you flummoxed. Accounting 
is a cross between mathematics and the mystical arts; its goal is to record and 
report the financial performance of an organization. The end result of bookkeeping 
and accounting is a set of financial statements (page 453), but the starting point is 
the chart of accounts.
In accounting, an 
account
is more than a real-world account you have at a financial 
institution; it’s like a bucket for holding money used for a specific purpose. When 
you earn money, you document those earnings in an income account, just as you 
might toss the change from a day’s take at the lemonade stand into the jar on your 
desk. When you buy supplies for your business, that expense shows up in an ex-
pense account that works a lot like the shoebox you throw receipts into. If you buy 
a building, its value ends up in an asset account. And if you borrow money to buy 
that building, the mortgage owed shows up in a liability account.
Accounts come in a variety of types to reflect whether you’ve earned or spent 
money, whether you own something or owe money to someone else, as well as a 
few other financial situations. Your 
chart of accounts
is a list of all the accounts you 
use to track money in your business.
Neophytes and experienced business folks alike will be relieved to know that you 
don’t have to build a chart of accounts from scratch in QuickBooks. This chapter 
explains how to get a ready-made chart of accounts for your business and what to 
do with it once you’ve got it. If you want to add or modify accounts in your chart of 
accounts, you’ll learn how to do that, too.
Setting Up a Chart 
of Accounts
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Visual Studio .NET PDF SDK library supports adding text content to adobe PDF document in VB Add text to PDF in preview without adobe reader component
add page numbers to a pdf document; add page to pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature following example will tell you how to create a PDF document with 2 empty pages.
add a blank page to a pdf; add a page to a pdf
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
44
ACQUIRING 
A CHART OF 
ACCOUNTS
 NOTE 
Industry-specific Premier editions of QuickBooks include a Chart of Accounts, an Item List, Payroll 
items, and preferences already tuned to your industry (such as construction, manufacturing, nonprofit, professional 
services, or retail). The industry-specific editions also have features unique to each industry, like enhanced job 
costing in the Contractor edition. These features may save you time during setup and your day-to-day book-
keeping, but you have to decide whether you want to spend a few hundred dollars more than the QuickBooks 
Pro price tag to get them.
Acquiring a Chart of Accounts
When you create a new QuickBooks company file and choose an industry (page 
11), the program automatically sets up the chart of accounts with accounts that are 
typical for that industry. For example, if you choose a product-oriented industry, 
you’ll see an income account for product or parts income, while a service-oriented 
business gets an income account for service or labor income. If your company is 
like many small businesses, the chart of accounts that QuickBooks creates includes 
everything you need.
However, if you want to customize your chart of accounts to mirror your company’s 
needs, the easiest—although probably not the cheapest—way to get a chart of ac-
counts is from your accountant. Accountants understand the accounting guidelines 
set by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB—pronounced “faz bee”), a 
private-sector organization that sets standards with the SEC’s blessing. When your 
accountant builds a QuickBooks chart of accounts for you, you can be reasonably 
sure that it includes all the accounts you need to track your business and that those 
accounts conform to accounting standards. If you’re a business owner and want a 
specific account or want to see your business financials in a particular way, ask your 
accountant what type of accounts to use and how to set them up.
 NOTE 
Don’t worry—getting an accountant to build a chart of accounts for you probably won’t bust your 
budget, since the accountant won’t start from scratch. Many financial professionals maintain spreadsheets of ac-
counts and build a chart of accounts by importing a customized account list into QuickBooks. Or, they may keep 
QuickBooks company files around to use as templates for new ones.
If you don’t want to pay an accountant to create a chart of accounts for you, how 
about finding one built by experts and available at no charge? A quick search on 
the Web for “QuickBooks chart of accounts” returns links to sites with predefined 
charts of accounts. For example, in the not-for-profit world, the National Center for 
Charitable Statistics website (
http://nccs.urban.org/projects/ucoa.cfm
) includes 
downloadable QuickBooks files that contain the Unified Chart of Accounts for 
nonprofits (known as the UCOA). You can download a QuickBooks backup file of a 
nonprofit company file, complete with a chart of accounts (see page 508 to learn 
how to restore a backup file), an .iif file that you can import into QuickBooks, or a 
backup file for the Mac version of QuickBooks.
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
Word document pages and how to split Word document in C# .NET class application. By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting
add page number to pdf online; adding pages to a pdf document in preview
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
PowerPoint document pages and how to split PowerPoint document in C# .NET class application. By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and
add contents page to pdf; add page pdf reader
CHAPteR 3: SETTING UP A CHART OF ACCOUNTS
45
ACQUIRING 
A CHART OF 
ACCOUNTS
 NOTE 
If you have an Excel spreadsheet with your company account information, you can import that info 
directly into your company file. Page 127 has the full story on importing from Excel.
If you run a restaurant, you can go to 
www.rrgconsulting.com/restaurant_coa.htm
and download a free .iif file with a restaurant-oriented chart of accounts that you 
can import into QuickBooks, as explained in the next section.
Importing a Chart of Accounts
If you download an .iif file with a chart of accounts, you can import that file into a 
QuickBooks company file. Because you’re importing a chart of accounts, you want to 
create your company file with basic info about your company and as few accounts as 
possible in the chart of accounts list. Here’s how you create a QuickBooks company 
file with bare-bones information and then import a chart of accounts from an .iif file:
1. Choose FileNew Company; in the QuickBooks Setup dialog box that ap-
pears, click Express Start.
If you see a screen that asks for your email address and password, enter the 
email address and password for your Intuit account, and then click Continue.
2. On the “Tell us about your business” screen, enter your company’s name, 
type, and Tax ID. In the Industry box, enter 
Other/None
, and then click 
Continue.
3. On the “Enter your business contact information” screen, do just that.
See Chapter 1 for details. If you click Preview Your Settings and then click the 
Chart of Accounts tab, you see that the accounts list is empty, which is what 
you want. Click OK to close the preview window.
4. After you finish filling in your contact info, click Create Company File.
QuickBooks creates your company file and then displays the “You’ve got a 
company file! Now add your info” screen in the QuickBooks Setup dialog box.
5. To close the QuickBooks Setup dialog box, click Start Working, and then 
click the X at the top right of the Quick Start Center window that appears.
You can also close the QuickBooks Setup dialog box by clicking the X at the 
window’s upper right.
6. Choose FileUtilitiesImportIIF Files.
QuickBooks opens the Import dialog box to the folder where you stored your 
company file and sets the “Files of type” box to “IIF Files (*.IIF).”
7. Navigate to the folder that contains the .iif file you want to import, select 
the file, and then click Open.
A message box appears that shows how the import is progressing. If all goes 
well, QuickBooks then displays a message box that tells you that it imported 
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
programmed in C# class to develop user-defined PowerPoint slide adding and inserting It enables you to move out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with a
add multi page pdf to word document; add page numbers to pdf document in preview
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
APIs to process Tiff file and its pages, like merge to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. assemblies into your C# project by adding reference.
add page numbers to pdf in reader; add page pdf
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
46
PLANNING 
THE CHART OF 
ACCOUNTS
the data successfully; click OK. If QuickBooks ran into problems with the data 
in the .iif file, it tells you that it didn’t import the data successfully. In that case, 
you have to open the .iif file in a text editor or Excel and correct the account 
info. (You can see what information QuickBooks expects by 
exporting
an ac-
count list, as described on page 690.)
To admire your new chart of accounts, in the QuickBooks Home page’s Company 
panel, click Chart of Accounts (or press Ctrl+A). Now that your chart of accounts 
is in place, you can add more accounts, hide accounts you don’t need, merge ac-
counts, or edit the accounts on the list. The rest of this chapter explains how to do 
all these things.
Planning the Chart of Accounts
A chart of accounts is a tool for tracking your company’s finances at a relatively high 
level—it helps you produce financial statements (see page 453) and prepare your 
business tax returns. When setting up your chart of accounts, bear in mind that it 
will be easier to work with if you keep the number of accounts to a minimum. (The 
income statements for even ginormous global corporations typically fit on a single 
page.) This section helps you figure out which accounts you need and provides 
guidelines for naming and numbering them.
Do You Need Another Account?
QuickBooks offers several features—including items, jobs, and classes—that can 
provide details about your company’s performance without you having to add ad-
ditional accounts. So before you create an account, think about whether another 
feature can track the information you want instead. Here’s a brief description of 
what each feature does and when to use it:
• Accounts. When you create transactions in QuickBooks, the program allocates 
money to accounts in your chart of accounts. Then, when you run a Profit & 
Loss report (page 456), you see financial results by account. So create a new 
account if you want to see a particular pool of money broken out in your finan-
cial reports. For example, add an income account for services you’re offering 
in addition to your product sales.
 NOTE 
Subaccounts
(page 55) are an option if you want to break one category into several smaller pieces, 
such as divvying travel expenses up into airfare, lodging, transportation, and meals.
• Items. In QuickBooks, items track details about what you buy and sell. For ex-
ample, you might create dozens of items for each specific service you provide, 
such as cutting down trees, cutting logs, chipping wood, splitting wood, and 
hauling trash. However, each of those items can be assigned to the same services 
income account. Chapter 5 provides the full story on items.
• Jobs. If you work on different projects for the same customer, you can create 
jobs in QuickBooks (page 75). That way, you can assign invoices to specific 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe This smart and mature PDF image adding component of RasterEdge VB.NET PDF document processing SDK
adding a page to a pdf in preview; adding a page to a pdf document
CHAPteR 3: SETTING UP A CHART OF ACCOUNTS
47
PLANNING 
THE CHART OF 
ACCOUNTS
jobs and track income by job. You can also track job expenses by making bills 
or other expenses billable to specific jobs.
• Classes. If your business is broken into segments, such as regions, business 
units, or partners in a partnership, you can turn to classes (page 134). You can 
assign a class to each transaction, such as an invoice or bill, which lets you track 
income and expenses across accounts, customers, and vendors. For example, 
if you create a class for each business unit in your company, you can assign the 
appropriate class to each transaction you record. Then, a Profit & Loss report 
by class (page 458) will produce an income statement for each business unit.
Naming and Numbering Accounts
Account names and numbers make it easy for accountants, bookkeepers, and 
company employees to find the accounts they need. In addition, with standardized 
naming and numbering, you can compare your company’s financial performance 
with others in your industry. This section suggests some rules to follow as you set 
up naming and numbering conventions.
If you accept the accounts that QuickBooks recommends when you set up your 
company file, then they already have assigned names and numbers, as shown in 
Figure 3-1. You might think this lets you off the hook. But by taking the time to learn 
standard account numbers and names, you’ll find working with accounts more logical 
and understand more of what your accountant and bookkeeper say.
FiGURE 3-1
Accounts that QuickBooks adds to your 
chart of accounts during setup come with 
assigned names and numbers, as you can 
see here. 
To open the Chart of Accounts window, 
press Ctrl+A. If you don’t see account 
numbers in this window, page 49 tells you 
how to display them.
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
48
PLANNING 
THE CHART OF 
ACCOUNTS
ORGANIZING ACCOUNT NUMBERS
Account numbers are initially turned off when you create a new company file in 
QuickBooks (page 49 explains how to display them), and you don’t have to use 
them. However, account numbers make it easier for your bookkeeper or accountant 
to work with your financial records. This section explains the typical numbering 
convention that financial folks use.
Companies reserve ranges of numbers for different types of accounts, so they can 
identify the 
type
of account by its number alone. Business models vary, so you’ll 
find account numbers carved up in different ways depending on the industry. Think 
about your personal finances: You spend money on lots of different things, but 
your income derives from a precious few sources. Businesses and nonprofits are 
no different. So you might find income accounts numbered from 4000 to 4999 and 
expense accounts using numbers anywhere from 5000 through 9999 (see Table 3-1).
TABLE 3-1 
Typical ranges for account numbers
RANGE
ACCOUNT TYPE
1000–1999
Assets
2000–2999
Liabilities
3000–3999
Equity
4000–4999
Income
5000–5999
Cost of goods sold, cost of sales, job costs, 
or general expenses
6000–7999
Expenses, overhead costs, or other income
8000–9999
Expenses or other expenses
 NOTE 
Most businesses use the same account-numbering scheme up until the number 4999. After that, things 
can differ because some companies require more income accounts, but in most businesses, expense accounts are 
the most numerous.
Account numbering conventions don’t just carve number ranges up for account 
types. If you read annual reports as a hobby, you know that companies further 
compartmentalize their finances. For example, assets and liabilities get split into 
current
and 
long-term
categories. (Current means something that’s expected to 
happen within the next 12 months, such as a loan that’s due in 3 months; long-term 
is anything beyond 12 months.) Typically, companies show assets and liabilities pro-
gressing from the shortest to the longest term, and the asset and liability account 
numbers follow suit. Here’s one way to allocate account numbers for current and 
progressively longer-term assets:
• 1000–1099. Immediately available cash, such as a checking account, savings 
account, or petty cash.
• 1100–1499. Assets you can convert into cash within a few months to a year, 
including Accounts Receivable, inventory assets, and other current assets.
CHAPteR 3: SETTING UP A CHART OF ACCOUNTS
49
PLANNING 
THE CHART OF 
ACCOUNTS
• 1500–1799. Long-term assets, such as land, buildings, furniture, and other 
fixed assets.
• 1800–1999. Other assets.
Companies also break expenses down into smaller categories. For example, many 
companies keep an eye on whether their sales team is doing its job by tracking sales 
expenses separately and monitoring the ratio of sales to sales expenses. Sales ex-
penses often appear in the 5000–5999 range. QuickBooks reinforces this standard 
by automatically creating a Cost of Goods Sold account numbered 5001. (You can 
create as many Cost of Goods Sold accounts as you need to track expenses that 
relate directly to your income, such as the cost of purchasing products you sell, as 
well as what you pay your salespeople.) Other companies assign overhead expenses 
to accounts in the 7000–7999 range, so they can assign a portion of those expenses 
to each job performed.
 TIP 
When you add new accounts to your chart of accounts, increment the account number by 5 or 10 to leave 
room in the numbering scheme for similar accounts you might need in the future. For example, if your checking 
account number is 1000, assign 1010 or 1015 to your new savings account rather than 1001.
In QuickBooks, an account number can be up to seven digits long, but the program 
sorts numbers beginning with the leftmost digit. So if you want to categorize in ex-
cruciating detail, slice your number ranges into sets of 10,000. For example, assets 
range from 10000 to 19999; income accounts span 40000 to 49999, and so on.
 NOTE 
Because QuickBooks sorts accounts by number, beginning with the leftmost digit, account 4100020 
appears before account 4101.
VIEWING ACCOUNT NUMBERS
If you want to see or hide account numbers in QuickBooks, here’s how to turn them 
on or off:
1. Choose EditPreferencesAccounting, and then in the Preferences dialog 
box, click the Company Preferences tab.
You have to be a QuickBooks administrator (page 726) to open this tab.
2. Turn on the “Use account numbers” checkbox to show account numbers.
To hide them, turn 
off
this checkbox.
3. Click OK to close the Preferences dialog box.
With this setting turned on, account numbers appear in the Chart of Accounts win-
dow, account drop-down lists, and account fields. In addition, the Add New Account 
and Edit Account windows display the Number box so you can add or modify an 
account’s number.
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
50
PLANNING 
THE CHART OF 
ACCOUNTS
 NOTE 
Turning off the “Use account numbers” checkbox doesn’t remove account numbers you’ve already 
added; it simply hides them in the spots mentioned above. You can see them again by turning the checkbox back 
on. However, you can’t 
add
account numbers to any accounts you create while the checkbox is turned off. If you 
create an account anyway, you can then edit it (page 58) 
after
you turn on the “Use account numbers” checkbox 
to add an account number.
CHOOSING GOOD ACCOUNT NAMES
Account names should be meaningful, both to you and your accountant (or book-
keeper). In addition, your accounts should be unique in name and function because 
you don’t need two accounts for the same type of income, expense, or financial 
bucket. For example, if you consider advertising and marketing two distinctly differ-
ent activities, then create an account for each. But if advertising and marketing blur 
in your mind, then create one account with a name like “Marketing & Advertising.”
 NOTE 
Because accounts represent high-level categories, stick to names that summarize the income or 
expense, such as Service Income and Product Income. If your account names are something like Tom’s Consult-
ing, Dick’s Consulting, and Harry’s Consulting, your accounts and their names are too specific—and might cause 
confusion if Rosie takes over Harry’s work.
QuickBooks does its part to enforce unique account names. Say you try to create a 
new expense account named Postage, but an account by that name already exists. 
QuickBooks displays the message, “This name is already in use. Please use another 
name.” What QuickBooks 
can’t
do is ensure that each account represents a unique 
category of money. Without a naming standard, you could end up with multiple 
accounts with unique names, each representing the same category, as shown by 
the following names for accounts used to track postage:
Expense-postage
Postage
Postage and delivery
Shipping
If you haven’t used QuickBooks before, here are some rules you can apply to help 
make your account names consistent:
• Word order. If you include the account type in the name, then append it to 
the 
end
of the name. You’ll spot “Postage Expense” more easily than “Expense 
Postage.”
• Consistent punctuation. Choose “and” or “&” for accounts that cover more 
than one item, like “Dues and Subscriptions.” And decide whether to include 
apostrophes, as in “Owners Draw” or “Owners’ Draw.”
• Spaces. Decide whether to include spaces for readability or to eliminate them 
for brevity; for example, “Dues & Subscriptions” vs. “Dues&Subscriptions.”
• Abbreviation. If you abbreviate words in account names, then choose a standard 
abbreviation length. If you go with four-letter abbreviations, for example, “Post-
age” would become “Post.” For a three-letter abbreviation, you might use “Pst.”
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested