c# display pdf in winform : Add page to pdf online software control cloud windows web page asp.net class QuickBooks_2014_The_Missing_Manual8-part661

CHAPteR 3: SETTING UP A CHART OF ACCOUNTS
51
CREATING 
ACCOUNTS 
AND 
SUBACCOUNTS
 WARNING 
QuickBooks won’t enforce your naming standards. So after you set the rules for account names, 
write them down so you don’t forget them. A consistent written standard encourages everyone (yourself included) 
to trust and follow the naming rules. Also, urge everyone to display inactive accounts (page 59) and scan the 
chart of accounts for synonyms to see if such an account already exists 
before
creating a new one. These rules 
are easier to enforce if you limit the number of people who can create and edit accounts (page 735).
Creating Accounts and Subaccounts
As the box on page 52 explains, different types of accounts represent dramatically 
different financial animals. The good news is that every type of account in Quick-
Books shares most of the same fields, so you need to learn only one account-creation 
procedure.
If you look closely at the chart of accounts list in Figure 3-1, you’ll notice that ac-
counts fall into two main categories: those with balances and those without. If you’re 
really
on your toes, you might also notice that accounts with balances are the ones 
that appear on the Balance Sheet report. (Accounts without balances appear on 
the Profit & Loss report.) To learn more about financial statements and the accounts 
they reference, see Chapter 23.
Creating an Account
After you’ve had your business for a while, you won’t add new accounts very often. 
However, you might need one if you start up a new line of income, take on a mortgage 
for your new office building, or want a new expense account for the subcontractors 
you hire to manage your workload.
Creating accounts in QuickBooks is simple, which is a refreshing change from many 
accounting tasks. Before you can create an account, you have to open the Chart of 
Accounts window. Because the chart of accounts is central to accounting, you have 
several ways to open this window:
• Press Ctrl+A (which you can do from anywhere in the program).
• At the top right of the Home page, in the Company panel, click Chart of Accounts.
• In the menu bar, choose Lists→Chart of Accounts.
The Chart of Accounts window works much like other list windows. For example, you 
can sort the account list by different columns or drag accounts in the list to different 
locations. (See page 151 to learn how to sort and rearrange lists.)
 TIP 
You can create accounts on the fly by choosing <Add New> in any Account drop-down list. Suppose 
you create a new Service item (in the Item List window, press Ctrl+N) and want a new income account to track 
revenue for that service. In the New Item dialog box, scroll to the top of the Account drop-down list and then 
choose <Add New>. In the Add New Account dialog box that appears, fill in the various fields, and then click Save 
& Close. Back in the New Item dialog box, QuickBooks fills in the Account field with the new account, and you can 
finish creating your item.
Add page to pdf online - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
adding pages to a pdf document; adding page numbers to pdf in preview
Add page to pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page numbers to a pdf; add page numbers to a pdf in preview
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
52
CREATING 
ACCOUNTS 
AND 
SUBACCOUNTS
UP TO SPEED
Making Sense of Account Types
QuickBooks’ account types are standard ones used in finance. 
Here’s a quick introduction to the different types and what 
they represent:
• Bank. Accounts that you hold at a financial institution, 
such as a checking, savings, money market, or petty 
cash account.
• Accounts Receivable. The money that your customers 
owe you, like outstanding invoices and goods purchased 
on credit.
• Other Current Asset. Things you own that you’ll use 
or convert to cash within 12 months, such as prepaid 
expenses.
• Fixed Asset. Things your company owns that decrease in 
value over time (depreciate), like equipment that wears 
out or becomes obsolete.
• Other Asset. If you won’t convert an asset to cash in the 
next 12 months and it isn’t a depreciable asset, then 
it’s—you guessed it—an other asset. A long-term note 
receivable is one example.
• Accounts Payable. This is a special type of current liability 
account (money you owe in the next 12 months) that 
represents what you owe to vendors.
• Credit Card. Just what it sounds like: a credit card account.
• Other Current Liability. Money you owe in the next 12 
months, such as sales tax and short-term loans.
• Long Term Liability. Money you owe 
after
the next 12 months, 
like mortgage payments you’ll pay over several years. 
• Equity. The owners’ equity in your company, including 
the original capital invested in the company and retained 
earnings. (Money that owners withdraw from the com-
pany also shows up in an equity account but reduces the 
value of the account.)
• Income. The revenue you generate through your main 
business functions, like sales or consulting services.
• Cost of Goods Sold. The cost of products and materials 
that you held originally in inventory but then sold. You 
can also use this type of account to track other expenses 
related to your sales, such as commissions and what you 
pay subcontractors to do work for your customers.
• Expense. The money you spend to run your company.
• Other Income. Money you receive from sources other than 
business operations, such as interest income.
• Other Expense. Money you pay out for things other than 
business operations, like interest.
• Non-posting Account. QuickBooks creates non-posting 
accounts automatically when you use features such as 
estimates and purchase orders. For example, when you 
create an estimate (page 259), you don’t want that money 
to appear on your financial reports, so QuickBooks stores 
those values in non-posting accounts.
Once you’ve opened the Chart of Accounts window, here’s how to create an account:
1. Press Ctrl+N to open the Add New Account window.
Alternatively, on the menu bar at the bottom of the Chart of Accounts window, 
click Account→New. Or, right-click anywhere in the Chart of Accounts window, 
and then choose New from the shortcut menu. No matter which method you 
use, QuickBooks opens the Add New Account window shown in Figure 3-2.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Access to freeware download and online VB.NET to provide users the most individualized PDF page image inserting function, allowing developers to add and insert
add page number to pdf print; adding page numbers to pdf in
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add pdf pages to word document; add page number pdf file
CHAPteR 3: SETTING UP A CHART OF ACCOUNTS
53
CREATING 
ACCOUNTS 
AND 
SUBACCOUNTS
FiGURE 3-2
If you aren’t sure which 
type to choose for your 
new account, read the box 
on page 52. 
When you select one 
of the options here, a 
description with examples 
of that type of account 
appears on the right side 
of the window. Click More 
to read a Help topic that 
explains when to use that 
type of account.
2. Select the type of account you want to create, such as Bank for a bank ac-
count, and then click Continue.
The Add New Account window lists the most common kinds of accounts. If you 
don’t see the type you want—Cost of Goods Sold, for example—select the Other 
Account Types option, and then choose from the drop-down menu (Figure 3-2).
3. In the Number box in the upper right of the Add New Account window 
(Figure 3-3), type the chart of accounts account number you want to use. 
(If you don’t see the Number box, flip to page 49 to learn how to display it.)
If you keep the Chart of Accounts window in view while creating new accounts, 
you can review the account numbers for similar types of accounts. That way, 
you can give the new account a number that’s 5 or 10 higher than an existing 
account number, so that the new one snuggles in nicely with its compatriots in 
the chart of accounts.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via password by using simple VB.NET demo code. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF.
add a page to a pdf file; add blank page to pdf preview
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in C#.NET
add pdf pages together; add page number to pdf file
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
54
CREATING 
ACCOUNTS 
AND 
SUBACCOUNTS
FiGURE 3-3
The Bank account type 
includes every account 
field except the Note field, 
and includes a few fields 
that you won’t find in any 
other account type, such as 
Bank Acct. No. and Routing 
Number. If you want 
QuickBooks to remind 
you to order checks, in 
the “Remind me to order 
checks when I reach check 
number” field, type the 
check number you want 
to use as a trigger. And if 
you want the program to 
open a browser window 
to an Intuit site where you 
can order supplies, turn 
on “Order checks I can 
print from QuickBooks.” 
If you get checks from 
somewhere else, just 
reorder checks the way 
you normally do.
4. In the Account Name box, type a name for the account.
See page 50 for tips on standardizing account names.
 NOTE 
If you create an account and don’t see one of the fields mentioned here, it simply doesn’t apply to 
that account type.
5. If you want the account to be a subaccount, then turn on the “Subaccount 
of” checkbox. Then, in the drop-down list, choose the account that you 
want to act as the parent.
Subaccounts are a good way to track your finances in more detail, as the box 
on page 55 explains. In the chart of accounts, subaccounts are indented below 
their parent accounts to make the hierarchy easy to see, as shown at the bot-
tom of Figure 3-1 on page 47.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Please follow the sections below to learn more. DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
adding a page to a pdf document; add pages to pdf document
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add page number to pdf preview; add page numbers to pdf document in preview
CHAPteR 3: SETTING UP A CHART OF ACCOUNTS
55
CREATING 
ACCOUNTS 
AND 
SUBACCOUNTS
 TIP 
When you use subaccounts, QuickBooks displays both the parent account’s name and the subaccount’s 
name in the Account fields throughout the program, which often makes it impossible to tell which account a 
transaction uses, as you can see in Figure 3-4 (top). If you want to see only the lowest-level subaccount in Account 
fields, head to the Accounting section of the Preferences dialog box and turn on the “Show lowest subaccount 
only” checkbox, which is on the Company Preferences tab (see page 640).
FiGURE 3-4
Top: QuickBooks combines the 
names of parent accounts and 
their subaccounts into one long 
name in Account fields and 
drop-down lists, like the travel 
example shown here. In many 
instances, only the top-level ac-
count is visible unless you scroll 
within the Account field.
Bottom: When you turn on the 
“Show lowest subaccount only” 
checkbox, the Account field 
shows the subaccount number 
and name instead, which is 
exactly what you need to 
identify the assigned account (in 
this case, Airfare).
UP TO SPEED
Adding Detail with Subaccounts
Say your company’s travel expenses are sky high and you want 
to start tracking what you spend on different types of travel, 
such as airfare, lodging, and limousine services. Subaccounts 
make it easy to track details like these. Subaccounts are noth-
ing more than partitions within a higher-level account (called 
the 
parent
account).
When you post transactions to subaccounts only (not the parent 
account), your reports show the subtotals for the subaccounts 
and
a grand total for the parent account, such as the Travel 
account (number 6336, say) and its subaccounts Airfare (6338), 
Lodging (6340), and Transportation (6342), for example.
Subaccounts also come in handy for assigning similar expenses 
to different lines on a tax form. For example, the IRS doesn’t 
treat all travel expenses the same: You can deduct only half 
of your meal and entertainment expenses, while other travel 
expenses are fully deductible. Meals and Entertainment are 
separate subaccounts from Travel for this very reason.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
adding page numbers pdf file; adding page numbers to pdf in reader
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings. On this page, we will talk about how to achieve this via Add necessary references
add and remove pages from a pdf; add page numbers to pdf files
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
56
CREATING 
ACCOUNTS 
AND 
SUBACCOUNTS
6. If you’ve turned on QuickBooks’ multiple currency preference, the Currency 
box appears below the “Subaccount of” checkbox. If the currency for the 
account is different from the one listed there, choose the right currency in 
the drop-down list.
If you do business in more than one currency, see page 659 to learn how to set 
up multiple currencies in QuickBooks.
7. To add a description of the account, fill in the Description box.
For instance, you can define whether a bank account is linked to another account 
or give examples of the types of expenses that apply to a particular expense 
account. The Description field can hold up to 256 characters, which should be 
more than enough.
8. If you see a field for an account number—such as Bank Acct. No., Credit Card 
Acct. No., or simply Account No.—type in the number for your real-world 
account at your financial institution (checking account, savings account, 
loan, and so on).
If the account type you chose in step 2 doesn’t include a field for an account 
number, you see the Note field instead, which you can use to store any additional 
information you want to document about the account.
9. For a bank account, in the Routing Number box, type your bank’s routing 
number.
This is the nine-digit number in funny-looking font at the bottom of your checks.
10. To associate the account with a tax form and a specific line on that form, in 
the Tax-Line Mapping drop-down list, choose the entry for the appropriate 
tax form and tax line.
The Tax-Line Mapping field is set to <Unassigned> if you haven’t specified the 
tax form that your company files with the IRS. See page 12 to learn how to 
choose a tax form for your company.
If QuickBooks hasn’t assigned a tax line for you, you can scan the entries in the 
drop-down list for a likely match. If you don’t find an entry that seems right or 
if QuickBooks tells you the one you chose isn’t compatible with the account 
type, your best bet is to call your accountant or the IRS. You can also get a hint 
for an appropriate tax line for the account you’re creating by examining one of 
QuickBooks’ sample files (page 9).
To remove a tax line from an account, in the drop-down list, choose <Unassigned>.
 NOTE 
Below the Tax-Line Mapping field, you may see the Enter Opening Balance button. It’s easy to figure 
out the opening balance for a brand-new account—it’s zero—so you can ignore this button. But if you’re setting 
up QuickBooks with accounts that existed prior to your QuickBooks start date, those accounts 
do
have opening 
balances. Even so, clicking the Enter Opening Balance button isn’t the best way to specify an opening balance for 
an account you’re adding to your company file. The box on page 57 explains how to specify opening balances for 
all your accounts in just a few steps.
CHAPteR 3: SETTING UP A CHART OF ACCOUNTS
57
CREATING 
ACCOUNTS 
AND 
SUBACCOUNTS
11. Click the Save & New button to save the current account and create another 
one.
To save the account you just created and close the Add New Account window, 
click Save & Close instead. Click Cancel to discard the account-in-progress and 
close the Add New Account window.
12. If the Set Up Bank Feed dialog box appears, click Yes if you want to set up 
a bank account for online services.
When you click Yes, QuickBooks’ windows close while you go through the setup 
process. (See Chapter 24 to learn about online services and QuickBooks.) If you 
want to set up Bank Feeds later—or never—click No.
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION
Doing Opening Balances Right
When I add an account to my company file, can I just click the 
Enter Opening Balance button and type the balance I want to 
start with in the Opening Balance field? That seems the most 
logical place for it
.
You 
can
, but your accountant may not be too happy about it. 
Filling in the Opening Balance field from the Add New Account 
window (or in the Edit Account window, for that matter) auto-
matically adds that balance to the Opening Bal Equity account, 
which accountants consider sloppy bookkeeping. Instead, they 
usually recommend creating a journal entry from your trial 
balance for most of your accounts. 
The three exceptions are your Accounts Receivable (AR), Ac-
counts Payable (AP), and bank accounts. Because QuickBooks 
requires customer names and vendor names in journal entries 
that contain AR and AP accounts, you’re better off creating 
invoices and bills to define your AR and AP opening balances. 
With bank accounts, you can enter your previous reconciled 
balance in the Opening Balance field and then bring the ac-
count up to date by recording all the transactions since your 
last reconciliation. If you work with an accountant, ask her 
how she’d like you to enter opening balances—or better yet, 
have her do it.
Whoa! What’s a journal entry? What’s a trial balance?
Here’s the deal: 
Journal entries
(page 433) are mechanisms 
for moving money between accounts—on paper, that is. A 
trial balance
(page 452) is a report (from your accountant or 
your old accounting system) that lists all your accounts with 
their balances in either the Debit or Credit column. In the days 
of paper-based ledgers, bean counters totaled the Debit and 
Credit columns. If the totals weren’t equal, the accountant 
had to track down the arithmetic error. Happily, QuickBooks’ 
digital brain does the math for you, without errors. But it’s up 
to you to set up the journal entry properly in the first place.
If you look at the trial balance on the first day of your fiscal 
year, it’s quite simple—it includes balances only for your bal-
ance sheet accounts, not income and expense accounts. You 
can use these values to fill in a journal entry to assign all your 
accounts’ opening balances: First, set the journal entry’s date 
to the last day of the previous fiscal year; that way, you can 
start fresh for your current fiscal year. Next, for each account 
except
your AR and AP accounts, add a line in the journal entry 
with the account name and the balance from your trial balance 
report in either the Debit or Credit column. (If you didn’t use 
the Opening Balance field to set your bank account balances, 
you can include your bank accounts in the journal entry, too.) 
Finally, create invoices and bills to define the opening balances 
for your AR and AP accounts. 
To see what an opening balance journal entry looks like, head 
to page 439.
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
58
WORKING WITH 
ACCOUNTS
Working with Accounts
From time to time, you might need to modify your accounts to, for example, change 
an account’s name or description. If you no longer need an account, you can hide 
it to keep your chart of accounts list tidy. On the other hand, if you created an ac-
count by mistake, you can delete it. And merging accounts comes in handy if you 
find several accounts that represent the same thing. This section describes how to 
make all these changes to accounts.
Modifying Accounts
If you stick to your account numbering and naming conventions, you’ll have few 
reasons to edit accounts. But just in case, the Edit Account window lets you tweak 
an account’s name or description, adjust its number to make room for new accounts, 
or change its level in the chart of accounts hierarchy.
You’re not likely to change an account’s type unless you chose the wrong one when 
you created the account. If you do need to change the account type, back up your 
QuickBooks file first (see page 502) in case the change has effects that you didn’t 
anticipate. Also, note that QuickBooks has several restrictions on changing account 
types. You can’t change an account’s type if:
• It has subaccounts.
• It’s an Accounts Receivable or Accounts Payable account. (You also can’t change 
other types of accounts to AR or AP accounts.)
• QuickBooks automatically created the account, like Undeposited Funds.
To modify an account, in the Chart of Accounts window, select the account you want 
to edit and then press Ctrl+E or click Account→Edit Account. In the Edit Account 
window that appears, make your changes, and then click Save & Close.
Hiding Accounts
If you create an account by mistake, you can delete it (you’ll learn how in a sec). 
However, because QuickBooks drops your financial transactions into account buckets 
and you don’t want to throw away historical information, you’ll usually want to 
hide
accounts that you don’t use anymore instead of deleting them.
Records of past transactions are important, whether you want to review the amount 
of business you’ve received from a customer or the IRS is asking unsettling ques-
tions. When you hide an account in QuickBooks, the account continues to hold your 
historical transactions, but it doesn’t appear in account lists, so you can’t choose 
it by mistake with a misplaced mouse click. For example, you wouldn’t delete your 
Nutrition Service income account just because you’ve discontinued your nutrition 
consulting service to focus on selling your new book, 
The See Food Diet
. The income 
you earned from that service in the past needs to stay in your records.
Hiding and reactivating accounts (Figure 3-5) can also come in handy if QuickBooks 
created a chart of accounts for you based on the industry you chose during setup 
CHAPteR 3: SETTING UP A CHART OF ACCOUNTS
59
WORKING WITH 
ACCOUNTS
(page 11). If the chart of accounts it created includes accounts you don’t think you 
need, simply hide those accounts for the time being. That way, if you find yourself 
saying, “Gosh, I wish I had an account for the accumulated depreciation of vehicles,” 
the solution might be as simple as reactivating a hidden account.
FiGURE 3-5
Top: To hide an account, 
in the Chart of Accounts 
window, right-click the 
account and choose Make 
Account Inactive from this 
shortcut menu. The ac-
count and any subaccounts 
that belong to it disappear 
from the list.
Bottom: To reactivate 
a hidden account, first 
display all your accounts 
by turning on the “Include 
inactive” checkbox at the 
bottom of the Chart of Ac-
counts window. When you 
do that, QuickBooks adds 
a column with an X as its 
heading and displays an 
X in that column for every 
hidden account in the list. 
To un-hide an account, 
click the X next to its 
name. If the account has 
subaccounts, QuickBooks 
displays the Activate Group 
dialog box; there, click Yes 
to reactivate the account 
and
 all its subaccounts.
Deleting Accounts
You can delete an account 
only if
nothing in QuickBooks references it in any way. An 
account with references is a red flag that deleting it might not be the right choice. If 
you try to delete such an account, QuickBooks displays a message box telling you 
it can’t delete the account and recommends making it inactive instead. If that isn’t 
QUICKBOOKs 2014: tHe MIssInG MAnUAL
60
WORKING WITH 
ACCOUNTS
enough to deter you, the sheer tedium of removing references to an account should 
nudge you toward hiding the account instead. If you 
insist
on deleting an account, 
here are the conditions that prevent you from doing so and what you have to do to 
remove these constraints:
• An item uses the account. If you create any items that use the account as an 
income account, expense account, cost of goods sold account, or inventory asset 
account, you can’t delete it. You have to edit the items to use other accounts 
first, as described on page 113.
• The account has subaccounts. You have to delete all subaccounts before you 
can delete the parent account.
• Payroll uses the account. You can’t delete an account if your payroll setup 
uses it.
• A transaction references the account. If you created even one transaction that 
uses the account, either edit that transaction to use a different account or hide 
the account if you want to keep the transaction the way it is.
• The account has a balance. An account balance comes from either an open-
ing balance transaction or other transactions that reference the account. You 
remove an account balance by deleting all the transactions in the account (or 
reassigning them to another account).
To delete transactions, in the Chart of Accounts window, double-click the account’s 
name. For accounts with balances, QuickBooks opens a register window where you 
can select a transaction and then press Ctrl+D to delete it. For accounts without bal-
ances, QuickBooks opens an Account QuickReport window. To delete a transaction 
that appears in the report, double-click the transaction. QuickBooks then opens a 
window related to that transaction (for instance, the Write Checks window appears 
if the transaction is a check). Right-click anywhere in that window and choose Delete 
Check or the corresponding delete command for the type of transaction.
After you’ve deleted all references to the account, in the Chart of Accounts win-
dow, select the account you want to delete, and then press Ctrl+D or choose 
Account→Delete Account. QuickBooks asks you to confirm that you want to delete 
the account; click OK.
Merging Accounts
Suppose you find multiple accounts for the same purpose—Postage and Mail 
Expense, say—lurking in your chart of accounts. No problem! You can merge the 
accounts into one and then remind everyone who creates accounts in QuickBooks 
about your naming conventions. (If you haven’t gotten around to setting up naming 
conventions, see page 50 for some guidelines.)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested