c# free pdf viewer : Add page numbers to pdf online SDK control API wpf web page windows sharepoint R4%20information%20board%20guidelines2-part799

FEE INFORMATION
FEE REQUIRED
SINGLE SITE
With Pass Discount........................ $7
DOUBLE SITE
With Pass Discount...................... $10
PER VEHICLE
With Pass Discount................... $2.50
14
20
5
$
$
$
SELF-SERVICE PAY STATION
DAY USE FEE
INSTRUCTIONS
Fill out 
envelope and 
enclose fee.
Occupy 
campsite, 
note number, 
return within 
30 minutes.
Detatch stub 
and deposit 
envelope in 
fee box.  
Attatch stub to 
post located at 
occupied site. 
If no post, 
display on 
dashboard. 
PERMIT
For more information, contact:
Name Ranger District, Name National Forest
Street or mailing address
City, State, Zip
Phone 555-555-5555  -  www.fs.fed.us/XX
Additional Charge for Electric/Water/Sewer........... $5
Fees are used to manage and service this site. 
Violations punishable.  36 CFR 261.17.
CAMPING FEE
Thank You
The Recreation Fee Program allows the Forest 
Service to charge modest fees and reinvest the 
revenues. A minimum of 80 percent of the money 
collected is used to improve facilities and 
services, and the remaining amount is used to 
operate the program. 
THE MONEY IS TYPICALLY USED TO 
Keep areas cleaner 
and repair vandalism
Improve recreation 
facilities
Enhance visitor services 
and information
Improve public safety 
YOUR FEES ACCOMPLISHED
Illabori arum nam, et aut officim 
audit ati optissim quae et, alici-
mus et atur, nissit rerume molorit 
fuga. Is voloreriae aligenitibus etur 
aut repudant eum fuga. Tiora quo 
derumque pe resequedia nonem.
THANK YOU
FEE PROGRAM
RECREATION FEE PROGRAM INFORMATION
The National Parks and Federal Recreatonal Lands Passes
AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL 
Golden Age and Golden Access Passports are Also Honored
GOLDEN PASSPORT
Learn more about these Pass Programs and how to obtain them at: www.store.usgs.gov/pass
HONORED PASSES
INTERAGENCY PASSES
Choose from over a thousand places....
LAKESIDE, MOUNTAIN, and OTHER RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES
USDA Forest Service
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
National Park Service
Bureau of Reclamation
Bureau of Land Management
RESERVE YOUR NEXT TRIP NOW!
www.recreation.gov
1-877-444-6777
Enjoy America’s Great Outdoors With Confidence
SITE RESERVATION
NATIONAL RECREATION RESERVATION SERVICE
SIGN PLACEMENT
21
Multi-Panel Sign with Fee Information or Fee Only Sign
If possible, keep fee information on a panel by itself. This will allow your viewers 
to easily distinguish this information from the rest of your signs. This is
important if you want them to pay the required fees. 
If you are going to put fee information on a multi-panel sign, keep the fee 
information on the far left panel. Since we read from left to right, this will make 
sure your visitors see this information first. 
If you do not want fee information to take up an entire panel, you can choose 
a template that accommodates this. These templates will give you extra posting 
room for site specific notes or supervisors orders. 
FEE REQUIRED
SELF-SERVICE PAY STATION
SINGLE SITE
With Pass Discount........................ $7
DOUBLE SITE
With Pass Discount...................... $10
PER VEHICLE
With Pass Discount................... $2.50
14
20
5
$
$
$
CAMPING  FEES
DAY USE FEE
To pay follow the instructions to the right.  
Additional Charge for Electric/Water/Sewer.......... $5
INSTRUCTIONS
Occupy campsite, 
note  number, return 
within 30 minutes.
Fill out en n ve lope and 
enclo se fee.
Detatc h stub and 
deposit envelope  in 
fee box.  
Attatch stub to post 
located at occup p ied 
site. If no p p ost, 
display on  dashbo o ard. 
P E RM IT
For more i i nformati on,  contact:
Name Ranger District, Name National Forest
Street or maili ng address
Ci ty,  State,  Zip
Phone 555- 555- 5555  -  www.fs. . fed.us/XX
Viola tions p p unishab le.  36 CFR 261.17.
Fees are used to manage and service this site. 
HONORED PASSES
America the Beautiful
The National Parks and Federal
Recreatonal Lands Passes
Golden Passports
Golden Passports
Golden Age and Golden
Access Passports are Honored
INTERAGENCY PASSES
ABOUT FOREST PASSES
America the Beautiful Interagency Passes are the 
most convenient way to pay or receive a discount on 
federal lands that require a fee.  Senior passes are 
available for a one-time fee of $10 for US citizens 
over 62 years of age.  Access passes are available 
for US citizens that have been medically determined 
to have a permanent disability that severely limits 
one or more major life activity.  
Learn more about these Pass Programs and h h ow to 
obtain them at: www.fs.fed.u s/r4 /dixie
FOREST PASSES
The Recreation Fee Program allows the Fore st 
Service to charge modest fees and reinvest the 
revenues. A minimum o o f 80 perce nt of the money 
collected is used to imp p rove facilities and 
services, and the remaining amount is used to  
operate the program. 
THE MONEY IS TYPICALLY USED TO 
Keep areas cleaner 
and repair vandalism
Improve recreation 
facilities
Enhance visitor services 
and information
Improve public safety 
YOUR FEES ACCOMPLISHED
Illabori arum nam, et aut officim 
audit ati optissim quae et, alici-
mu s et atur, nissit rerume molorit 
fu ga. Is voloreriae aligenitibus etur 
aut repudant eum fuga. Tiora quo 
derumque pe resequedia nonem.
THANK YOU
FEE PROGRAM
RECREATION FEE PROGRAM INFORMATION
Choose from over a thousand places....
LAKESIDE, MOUNTAIN, and OTHER RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES
USDA Fo rest Service
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
National Park Service
Bureau of Reclamation
Bureau of Land Management
RESERVE YOUR NEXT TRIP NOW!
www.recreation.gov
1-877-444-6777
Enjoy America’s Great Outdoors With Confidence
SITE RESERVATION
NATIONAL RECREATION RESERVATION SERVICE
Add page numbers to pdf online - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page number to pdf document; add page number pdf
Add page numbers to pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add pages to pdf preview; add page to existing pdf file
SIGN PLACEMENT
22
Single Panel Sign or Welcome Section of a Multi-Panel Sign
Ebenezer Bryce Campground Loop
Host Site
Site Number
Information & Fee Box
Tent Pad
Picnic Area
Restrooms
Water
Dumpster 
1
H
H
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
8
10
11
12
13
14
0
50
100
200
300
Feet
Although black bears rarely attack, they are very powerful animals capable of injuring 
or killing humans. These steps may be helpful if you encounter a bear. 
•If you see a bear in the distance, make a wide detour or leave the area.
•Do not feed or toss food to a bear, or any other wild animal.
•Pick up children or put them on your shoulders. 
•Watch for vehicles on campground roads.
•Never approach bears - they are dangerous wild animals. If a bear changes 
its natural behavior because of your presence, you are too close.
•Give a bear plenty of room to pass, and it usually will. 
BEAR COUNTRY
BE AWARE AND WATCH FOR WARNING SIGNS OF BEARS
•Don’t run.
•Back away slowly.
•Face the bear, but don’t look directly into 
its eyes. 
If a Bear Approaches You
•Keep it in sight.
•Make yourself look bigger by waving your 
arms and yelling.
•Make lots of noise and stomp your feet. 
As a visitor to this national forest you will find many opportunities to enjoy and explore 
nature’s creations. In addition to the beauty, there are also potential hazards. Please 
remember that YOU are ultimately responsible for your own safety.
•Scout your campsite for hazards including poison ivy, bees, ants and sharp objects.
•Store all food in vehicles or tight food containers and away from sleeping areas. 
•Resist the temptation to feed or handle wild animals, for their safety and yours. 
•Watch for vehicles on campground roads.
•Wear shoes and carry a flashlight when walking after dark.
•Keep your campfire small, within the grill provided. Make sure your campfire is dead out and 
cold before you leave.
Always be AWARE, ALERT & CAUTIOUS
Some visitors have different agendas besides relaxation, exploration and recreation. These agendas may 
include drug production, theft, arson and other illegal acts.
Avoiding these areas if discovered is the safest course of action. Report sightings to local law enforcement 
personnel only after you have relocated to a safe area.
SAFE CAMPING
YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY
Non Emergency Numbers 
EMERGENCY ONLY CALL 911 
CONTACT INFO
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY
Ranger District........................................................
Supervisor’s Office..................................................
County Sheriff’s Office............................................
Division of Wildlife Resources................................
Poaching Hotline..................................................
Regional Medical Center........................................
City Police Department ..........................................
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
1-800-662-3337
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
When you call for help, be sure to give your location. This area is on the Name of 
Ranger District of the Name of National Forest.  Please note that your cell 
phone may not work in some areas due to tower location and terrain.
FEED BACK
Tell Us What You Think
We strive to make your visit the most safe 
and enjoyable possible. Please let us know if 
you see conditions that may be unsafe. 
Reporting these incidents helps us provide a 
better experience for you.
 
Volunteer
Volunteering for the Forest Service is a fun 
and rewarding way to learn new skills and 
YOUR OPINION MATTERS
experience the 
outdoors. Contact the 
local Forest Service 
office for more 
information or go to 
www.volunteer.gov
WELCOME
TO CAMPGROUND NAME HERE
Olorero eaquaec torroresti di con paritatatur, simi, utatur aditet 
ulparunt. Mo culluptatem alis et offic tem nonsequ iducit renihil 
incte mossit audigenis ipicidem eos dolupta dolut ex eum 
quam, vendus. Ne nus, qui blanture rem sunt accus et eos der-
natu repelique occus, omnistiaes is nusam net alit ateceaq 
uodisqu atatio. Aritate illant rations equam, aut volor aligente 
sunt, cor sequasp iduciaspe quos eos apedica temporem aut hit 
modionseque sandit, ipid quae. 
Ceres aliatio rrovit aut que voluptur? Quiae derunt omnis poria 
quat licipsunda cusanda ntiistiorem qui ratiore consedi tiisit 
faccum liquia quistoribus. Rovid quamusciet id est, ulpa dem et 
laborempos doloremped mod quia iduntum faccusa nostrupis 
et eum eatemqu iaestibus rate occus dolore, in pa dolo mag-
nima aut que maxim is et volorpo ssitae rem et voluptur atia 
sae met doluptaque.
Thanks for visiting. Enjoy your stay!
EBENEZER BRYCE LOOP
Ebenezer Bryce Campground Loop
Host Site
Site Numb b er
Info rmation & Fee Box
Tent Pad
Picnic Area
Restrooms
Water
Dump ster 
1
H
H
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
8
10
11
12
13
14
0
50
100
200
300
Feet
Although black bears rarely attack, they are very powerful animals capable of injuring 
or killing humans. These steps may be helpful if you encounter a bear. 
•If you see a bear in the distance, make a wide detour or leave the area.
•Do not feed or toss food to a bear, or any other wild animal.
•Pick up children or put them on your shoulders. 
•Watch for vehicles on campground roads.
•Never approach bears - they are dangerous wild animals. If a bear changes 
   its natural behavior because of your presence, you are too close.
•Give a bear plenty of room to pass, and it usually will. 
BEAR COUNTRY
BE AWARE AND WATCH FOR WARNING SIGNS OF BEARS
•Don’t run.
•Back away slowly.
•Face the bear, but don’t look directly into 
   its eyes. 
If a Bear Approaches You
•Keep it in sight.
•Make yourself look bigger by waving your 
   arms and yelling.
•Make lots of noise and stomp your feet. 
•Keep your pet under physical restraint 
   at all times.
•Give your dog plenty of water and rest, 
   and watch for signs of stress and 
   fatigue.
•Keep your dog leashed and under 
   control in campgrounds. Secure your 
   pet in a shady spot and give it lots of 
   attention to minimize barking.
•If you encounter wild animals, respect 
   them by restraining your dog. 
IF YOU HAVE A DOG
KEEP YOUR PET SECURE AT ALL TIMES
In the national forest, you and your dog could meet people, horses, mountain bikes, 
ATVs, other dogs, and wild animals. Help make the outdoor experience enjoyable for 
you, your dog and all the forest’s users by following these safety tips:
keep man’s 
BEST FRIEND
safe & happy
As a visitor to this national fo rest you will find  many opportunities to enjoy and explo re 
nature’s creations. In addition to the beauty, there are also potential h h azards. Please 
remember that YOU are ultima a tely responsible for your own safety.
•Scout your campsite for hazards including poison ivy, bees, ants and sharp objects.
•Store all food in vehicles or tight food containers and away from sleeping areas. 
•Resist the temptation to feed or handle wild animals, for their safety and yours. 
•Watch for vehicles on campground roads.
•Wear shoes and carry a flashlight when  walking after dark.
•Keep your campfire small, within the grill provided. Make sure your campfire is dead out and 
cold before you leave.
Always be AWARE, ALERT & CAUTIOUS
Some visitors have different agendas besides relaxation, exploration and recreation. These agendas may 
include drug production, theft, arson and other illegal acts.
Avoiding these areas if discovered is the safest course of action. Report sightings to local law enforcement 
personnel only after you have relocated to a safe area.
SAFE CAMPING
YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY
CONTACT INFO
CONTACT INFO
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY
Non Emergency Numbers 
EMERGENCY ONLY CALL 911 
Name of Ranger Di strict
Name of National  Forest
5555 Somethi i ng Lane
City,  State Area Code
555-555- 5555
www.website. com
Ranger Dis
Supervisor’s Of
County Sheriff’s Of
Division of Wildlife Resources................................................................
Poac
Regional Medical Center
City Police D D epar
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
1-800-662-3337
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
Whe n you call for help, be su u re to give your location. This area is on the Name of 
Ranger District of the Name of National Fore st.  Ple ase note that your cell phon n e 
may not work in some  areas d d ue to towe e r location  and terrain.
WELCOME
WELCOME TO THE THOMAS FORSYTH GROUP AREA LOOP
Thanks for visiting. Enjoy your stay!
Olorero eaqu u aec torroresti di con pa a ritatatur, simi, utatur aditet ulparunt. Mo cullupta-
tem alis et offic tem nonse e qu iducit renihil incte mossit au u digenis ipicidem eos do-
lupta do o lut ex eum quam, vendus. Ne nu u s, qui blanture rem sun n t accus et eos der-
n atu repelique occus, omn istiaes is nusam net alit ateceaq  uodisqu a a tatio. Aritate 
illant rations equam, aut volor aligente sunt, cor sequ u asp iduciaspe  quos eos ap p edica 
temporem aut hit modionseq ue sand d it, ipid qu u ae. 
Ceres aliatio rrovit aut que voluptur? Quiae derunt omnis poria quat licipsunda 
cu sa nda n n tiistiorem qui ratiore co nsedi tiisit faccum liquia  quistoribus. Rovid qua-
musciet id est, ulpa dem et laborempos dolorempe e d mod quia idu ntum faccusa nos-
trupis et eum e e atemqu iaestib us rate  occus dolore, in pa dolo magnima aut que 
maxim is et volorpo ssitae rem et vo luptur atia sae met d d oluptaque.
FIRE SAFETY
ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT FOREST FIRES
Make sure your fire is DEAD OUT
• NEVER leave a  fire unattended.
• Keep your fires small and bring your own firewood. If you have 
to collect firewood at your campsite, collect dead and down 
wood only. 
• Check at the local Ranger Station for curren n t fire restrictions. 
Remember, they ca n change on a daily basis.
• Use existing fire rings. Scrape away litter and any other burnable
material within a 10-foot-diameter circle surrounding the fire ring.
• Make su re all wood fits inside the fire ring.
• To put out a campfire, slowly pour 
water onto th e fire and stir with 
a shovel until all material is co ol
to the tou ch .
• Do not bu u ry your fire. The coals can
smolder and re-ignite.
• Make su re the fire is dead out. Many 
wildfires have bee e n caused by
abandoned campfires. 
ARTIFACTS
PROTECT THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE
When  you visit an archaeological site, remember that you a a re 
visitin g someone’s home. Be careful where you walk and  sit, 
and leave ob b jects where you find them. Prehistoric and h h istoric 
sites and artifa cts are irrepla ce able re sources th at prove de 
clues and u u nderstanding into ou u r collective heritage. It is ille e gal 
to damage sites or to remove artifacts. 
Do
• Use designated trails or walk on slickrock
• Leave all artifacts in place
• Take photos or sketch rock art
• View structures from a distance
• Let others enjoy the thrill of discovery
Don’t 
• Create new trails or paths
• Gather artifacts into piles or take them home
• Touch or leave marks on rock art (the oil in your fingers may damage 
the fragile art)
• Sit or walk on walls, or enter structures
• Reveal site locations on websites or give out GPS coordinates
THOMAS FORSYTH LOOP
HORSE BACK RIDING
TREAD LIGHTLY!
• P P ack out what you p p ack in. 
• P P ractice minimum impact camping by usin g established sites. 
• When selectin g a campsite, first consider your horses; th e site should 
accommodate them without damaging the area. 
• Inspect grazing opportu nities before making camp. 
• Use yards, paddocks, and hitchin g rails where provided. 
• Use hitchlines, h h obbles, and staking to confine animals. E E rect hitch h lin es in 
rocky areas with established trees. 
• If you use tempo o rary corrals, move the enclosures twice daily. 
• When breaking camp , remove or sca tter manure, remove excess hay and straw, 
and fill areas dug up by animal hooves. 
• Observe proper sanitary waste disposal o o r pack your waste out. 
• Bring pe e lle ts, grain, or weed-free hay to areas where feed is limited or gra zing is 
not allowed. This he e lps reduce the spread of invasive species. 
• Wash yo ur gear and support vehicle an n d check your animal before and after 
every ride to avo id the spread of invasive species. 
• Build a trail community. Get to know other types of re creationists that share 
you r favorite trail. 
There are simple things you can do when you ride your horse to pro tect your 
National Forest. Most imp p ortantly is leaving the area better than you  found it. You  
can do th is b b y Educating yourse lf prior to yo ur trip by obtaining travel maps a a nd 
regulations from public agencies, planning, taking h h orseback riding skills classes, 
and kno o wing how to  properly manage your horse. It is also imp p ortant to respect 
the right of others. By do o ing this, you and your fellow campers can enjoy their 
recreational activities un n disturb ed. 
Do Your Part
USDA
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
The U. . S.  Depart t ment  of Agri cult ure (USDA) prohibit t s di scri mination in all  it t s program s and 
act iviti es on t t he basi i s of  race, color, nati onal origin, age,  disabi i lit y, and where appl l icable, 
sex, marit al  st t atus,  fami i lial st at us, parental  st t atus,  rel l igi on,  sexual  orientati i on, genet ic 
informat ion, polit t ical  bel l iefs, reprisal l , or because all or part of  an individual’ ’ s income i i s 
derived from any publi c assist ance program.  (Not all  prohibited bases apply t t o al l 
programs. )  Persons with disabi i lit ies who require alternati ve means f f or communi i cati on of 
program informat t ion (Brai i lle, large print,  audi i ot ape, et t c. ) should cont t act  USDA’s TARGET 
Cent er at (202)  720- - 2600 ( ( voice and TDD).   To fi le a complaint  of discrimi i nat ion,  wri i te t t o 
USDA, Director,  Off f ice of  Civil Right s,  1400 I I ndependence Avenue, S. W.,  Washington, D.C. .  
20250-9410,  or call (800) 795-3272 ( ( voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD) .  USDA i i s an equal l  
opport unit y provi der and employer.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
11
9
10
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
22
23
H
Host Site
Site Number
Information & Fee Box
Tent Pad
Picnic Area
Restrooms
Water
Dumpster 
1
H
Tell Us What You Think
We strive to make your visit the most safe and enjoyable possible. 
Please let us know if you see conditions that may be unsafe. Reporting 
these incidents helps us provide a better experience for you.
FEED BACK
Volunteer
Volunteering for the Forest Service is a fun and 
rewarding w w ay to learn new  skills and experience 
the outdoors. Contact the local Forest Service 
office for more information or go to 
www .volunteer.gov.  
YOUR OPINION MATTERS
WELCOME
TO CAMPGROUND NAME HERE
Olorero eaquaec torroresti di con paritatatur, simi, utatur aditet 
ulparu nt. Mo culluptatem alis et offic tem nonsequ iducit renihil 
incte mossit audigenis ipicidem eos dolupta dolut ex eum 
quam, vendus. Ne nus, qu u i blanture rem sunt accus et eos der-
natu repelique occus, omnistiaes is n n usam net alit ateceaq 
uodisqu atatio. Aritate illant rations equam, aut volor aligente 
sunt, cor sequasp iduciaspe quos eos apedica temporem aut hit 
modionseque sandit, ipid quae. 
Ceres aliatio rrovit au u t que volup p tur? Quiae derunt omnis poria 
quat licipsunda cusanda ntiistiorem qui ratiore consedi tiisit 
faccum liquia quistoribus. Rovid quamusciet id est, ulp p a dem et 
laborempos doloremped mod quia iduntum faccusa nostrupis 
et eum ea a temqu iaestibus rate occus dolore, in  pa dolo mag-
nima aut que maxim is et volorpo ssitae rem et voluptur atia 
sae met doluptaque.
Thanks for visiting. Enjoy your stay!
WILDLIFE
HOW TO INTERACT WITH WILDLIFE
Keep wildlife “wild” by not approaching them
• Give wildlife their space. Use those binoculars!
• Do not feed wildlife. A A nimals that become habituated to 
handouts can eventually become nu u isances, losin g their 
instinctive fears of people. 
• Always keep your camp clean with  food in  secure, an n imal-
proof containers.
• If you find what you believe to be an “orphaned” or sick 
animal, leave it alone. Often the pa a rents are close by and are 
waiting fo you to leave.
• Pets must be restrained at all times.
• Leave the area if an animal shows signs of alarm. Watch and 
listen for raised ears, skittish movements, or alarm calls.
• Upon returning home, or while camping, check your body for 
ticks that may have found their way under your clothes. This is 
usually only a concern in the 
spring and early summer.
• Use insect repellen t during 
mosquito season.  
LOWER LEE MEADOW
PROTECT
care, share &
Your actions make a difference.
CONTACT INFO
CONTACT INFO
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY
Non Emergency Numbers 
EMERGENCY ONLY CALL 911 
Name of Ranger District
Name of National Forest
5555 Something Lane
City,  State Area Code
555- 555- 5555
www.websi te.com
Ranger Dis
Supervisor’s Of
County Sheriff’s Of
Division of Wildlife Resources................................................................
Poac
Regional Medical Center
City Police Depar
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
1-800-662-3337
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
When  you call for help, be sure to give your location. This area is on the Name of 
Ranger District of the Name of National Forest.  Please note that your cell phone 
may not work in some areas due to tower location and terrain.
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
them the ability to count the page numbers of generated PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add pages to an existing pdf; add pages to pdf acrobat
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated using this Word document adding control, you can add some additional Create Word From PDF.
add page numbers to pdf preview; adding a page to a pdf document
SIGN PLACEMENT
23
Other Non-Fee Areas of a Multi-Panel Sign
These areas are basically free areas. You can put whatever information here that you would like to tell your forest visitors, whether it is rules,  
resource protection, or site specific notes. 
Non Emergency Numbers 
EMERGENCY ONLY CALL 911 
CONTACT INFO
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY
Ranger District........................................................
Supervisor’s Office..................................................
County Sheriff’s Office............................................
Division of Wildlife Resources................................
Poaching Hotline..................................................
Regional Medical Center........................................
City Police Department ..........................................
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
1-800-662-3337
555-555-5555
555-555-5555
When you call for help, be sure to give your location. This area is on the Name of 
Ranger District of the Name of National Forest.  Please note that your cell 
phone may not work in some areas due to tower location and terrain.
Ebenezer Bryce Campground Loop
Host Site
Site Number
Information & Fee Box
Tent Pad
Picnic Area
Restrooms
Water
Dumpster 
1
H
H
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
8
10
11
12
13
14
0
50
100
200
300
Feet
WELCOME
TO CAMPGROUND NAME HERE
Olorero eaquaec torroresti di con paritatatur, simi, utatur aditet 
ulparunt. Mo culluptatem alis et offic tem nonsequ iducit renihil 
incte mossit audigenis ipicidem eos dolupta dolut ex eum 
quam, vendus. Ne nus, qui blanture rem sunt accus et eos der-
natu repelique occus, omnistiaes is nusam net alit ateceaq 
uodisqu atatio. Aritate illant rations equam, aut volor aligente 
sunt, cor sequasp iduciaspe quos eos apedica temporem aut hit 
modionseque sandit, ipid quae. 
Ceres aliatio rrovit aut que voluptur? Quiae derunt omnis poria 
quat licipsunda cusanda ntiistiorem qui ratiore consedi tiisit 
faccum liquia quistoribus. Rovid quamusciet id est, ulpa dem et 
laborempos doloremped mod quia iduntum faccusa nostrupis 
et eum eatemqu iaestibus rate occus dolore, in pa dolo mag-
nima aut que maxim is et volorpo ssitae rem et voluptur atia 
sae met doluptaque.
Thanks for visiting. Enjoy your stay!
BLACK BEARS
TIPS FOR CREATING A BEAR FREE ZONE
• Always keep a clean camp.
• Store food, including stock and pet food, in bear-proof 
containers. (Coolers and plastic boxes are not bear-proof.
• Hang food if bear-proof containers are not avaliable.
• Keep sleeping areas free of food and odors.
• Do not sleep in clothes worn while cooking.
• Do not sleep in clothes worn while handling game 
or fish. 
MOUNTAIN LION
FAST FACTS
Scientific Name: Felis concolor
Common Names: Mountain Lion, Cougar, Puma
Size: Male – 137 pounds: Female – 98 pounds
Habitat: The mountain lion’s habitat ranges from desert 
chaparral and badlands to subalpine mountains.
Hunting Habits: Lions primarily eat deer; however, they 
also kill elk, porcupines, small mammals, wild horses, 
livestock and pets.  One lion can consume up to 30 
pounds of meat in one meal. They often cache their 
prey or bury it and return to feed on the animal for days.
Interesting Facts: They are good climbers and can 
leap more than 20 feet up into a tree from standstill. 
Plan Ahead and Prepare 
Know the regulations and special concerns for 
the area you’ll visit. Prepare for extreme 
weather, hazards, and emergencies. Visit in 
small groups when possible. Use a map and 
compass to eliminate the use of marking paint, 
rock cairns or flagging. 
Stay on Durable Surfaces
Durable surfaces include established trails and 
campsites, rock, gravel, dry grasses or snow. 
Protect riparian areas by camping at least 200 
feet from lakes and streams. Good campsites 
are found, not made. 
Dispose of Waste Properly
Pack it in, pack it out. Inspect. Pack out all trash and leftover food. Deposit solid human 
waste in catholes dug 6 to 8 inches deep at least 200 feet from water, camp, and trails. 
Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products.
Leave What You Find 
Preserve the past: examine, but do not touch, cultural or historic structures and 
artifacts. Leave rocks, plants and other natural objects as you find them.
Minimize Campfire Impacts 
Use a lightweight stove for cooking and enjoy a candle lantern for light. Where fires 
are permitted, use established fire rings, fire pans, or mound fires.  Keep fires  small. 
Burn all wood and coals to ash, put out campfires completely, then scatter cool ashes.
Respect Wildlife 
Observe wildlife from a distance. Do not follow or approach them. Never feed animals. 
Protect wildlife and your food by storing rations and trash securely.
Be Considerate of Others
Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience. Be courteous. Yield to 
other users on the trail.  Avoid loud voices and noises.
YOU
are
one of
MANY
this forest. Follow these
who use andenjoy
SIMPLE
tips to 
leave
NO
trace
of your
VISIT
Care, Share & Protect. Your actions make a difference. 
For more information visit www.lnt.org
LEAVE NO TRACE
YOUR ACTIONS MAKE A DIFFERENCE
OHV USAGE
FOLLOW THESE TIPS FOR YOUR SAFETY
Ride Responsibly
• Wear proper safety gear.
• Maintain a safe speed.
• Stay alert. Expect the unexpected.
• Always tell someone where you are going for safety reasons.
• Buddy up with two or three riders, reducing vulnerability if you have an accident. 
• Drive over, not around obstacles to avoid widening the trail. 
• Cross streams only at designated fording points, where the trail crosses the stream.
• Travel only on routes designated for your use. 
• Obey signs and temporary postings.
• Don’t mix riding with alcohol or drugs.
Respect the Right of Others
• Be considerate of others on the road or trail.
• Yield the right of way to those passing you or traveling uphill. Yield to mountain bikers, 
hikers, and horses. 
• Do not ride around in camping, picnicking, or trailhead areas. 
• Keep speeds low around crowds and in camping areas. 
• Keep the noise and dust down.
Educate Yourself
• Obtain a map—motor vehicle use map where appropriate—of your destination and determine 
which areas are open to ATVs. 
• Check the weather forecast before you go. Prepare for the unexpected by packing a small 
backpack full of emergency items. 
• Know your limitations. Watch your time, your fuel, and your energy. 
Avoid Sensitive Areas
• Avoid sensitive areas such as meadows, lakeshores, wetlands and streams.  Other sensitive 
habitats to avoid include cryptobiotic soils of the desert, tundra, and seasonal nesting or 
breeding areas.
• Do not disturb historical, archeological, or paleontological sites. 
• Avoid “spooking” livestock and wildlife you encounter. 
• Motorized and mechanized vehicles are not allowed in designated Wilderness Areas. 
AREA RULES
AREA RULES
EBENEZER BRYCE LOOP
FEED BACK
Tell Us What You Think
We strive to make your visit the most safe 
and enjoyable possible. Please let us know if 
you see conditions that may be unsafe. 
Reporting these incidents helps us provide a 
better experience for you.
Volunteer
Volunteering for the Forest Service is a fun 
and rewarding way to learn new skills and 
YOUR OPINION MATTERS
experience the 
outdoors. Contact the 
local Forest Service 
office for more 
information or go to 
www.volunteer.gov
ARTIFACTS
PROTECT THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE
When you visit an archaeological site, remember that you are visiting someone’s 
home. Be careful where you walk and sit, and leave objects where you find them. Pre-
historic and historic sites and artifacts are irreplaceable resources that provede clues 
and understanding into our collective heritage. It is illegal to damage sites or to 
remove artifacts. 
Do
• Use designated trails or walk on slickrock
• Leave all artifacts in place
• Take photos or sketch rock art
• View structures from a distance
• Let others enjoy the thrill of discovery
Don’t 
• Create new trails or paths
• Gather artifacts into piles or take them home
• Touch or leave marks on rock art (the oil in 
your fingers may damage the fragile art)
• Sit or walk on walls, or enter structures
• Reveal site locations on websites or give out 
GPS coordinates
As a visitor to this national forest you will find many opportunities to enjoy and explore 
nature’s creations. In addition to the beauty, there are also potential hazards. Please 
remember that YOU are ultimately responsible for your own safety.
•Scout your campsite for hazards including poison ivy, bees, ants and sharp objects.
•Store all food in vehicles or tight food containers and away from sleeping areas. 
•Resist the temptation to feed or handle wild animals, for their safety and yours. 
•Watch for vehicles on campground roads.
•Wear shoes and carry a flashlight when walking after dark.
•Keep your campfire small, within the grill provided. Make sure your campfire is dead out and 
cold before you leave.
Always be AWARE, ALERT & CAUTIOUS
Some visitors have different agendas besides relaxation, exploration and recreation. These agendas may 
include drug production, theft, arson and other illegal acts.
Avoiding these areas if discovered is the safest course of action. Report sightings to local law enforcement 
personnel only after you have relocated to a safe area.
SAFE CAMPING
YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY
NOXIOUS WEEDS
NOXIOUS WEEDS SPREAD RAPIDLY AND HARM THE ENVIRONMENT
A noxious weed is a plant that has been identified by the state of Nevada to be harmful to agriculture, the general public, or the 
environment. Noxious weeds can spread rapidly and compete aggressively with other plants for light, nutrients, and water.  Once 
noxious weeds inhabit a site, they often reproduce profusely, creating dense strands with extensive roots and soil seed banks 
that can persist formany years.
Impacts of Noxious Weeds
•Displaced wildlife and native plants 
•Reduced recreation potential
•Reduced aesthetic value
•Injury to humans and animals 
•Increased fire danger
Prevent the Spread
•Learn to recognize common weed species.
•Don’t camp or drive in weed infested areas.
•Don’t pick the flowers of noxious weeds and take them home.
•Clean contaminated vehicles, animals, and equipment. 
•When using pack animals, carry only feed that is certified weed-free. Within 96 
hours before entering backcountry areas, feed them only weed-free food. 
Protect your National Forest and prevent the spread of noxious weeds
BUR BUTTERCUP
CHEATGRASS
RUSSIAN KNA PWEE D
PUNCTUREVINE
WEED-FREE
WEED-FREE HAY IS REQUIRED
When using pack animals, carry only 
feed that is certified weed-free. Within 
96 hours before entering backcountry 
areas, feed them only weed-free food. 
•Remove weeds and burrs from 
animals, tack, trailers and trucks.
•Use a nosebag or manger to feed 
your horse.
• Give wildlife their space. Use those binoculars!
• Do not feed wildlife. Animals that become habituated to handouts can eventually 
become nuisances, losing their instinctive fears of people. 
• Always keep your camp clean with food in secure, animal-proof containers.
• If you find what you believe to be an “orphaned” or sick animal, leave it alone. 
Often the parents are close by and are waiting fo you to leave.
• Pets must be restrained at all times.
• Leave the area if an animal shows signs of alarm. Watch and listen
for raised ears, skittish movements, or alarm calls.
• Upon returning home, or while camping, check your body for ticks 
that may have found their way under your clothes. This is usually 
only a concern in the spring and early summer.
• Use insect repellent during mosquito season.  
Occupying Your Campsite
• Pay your camping fee within 30 minutes of arrival, and before   
2:00 p.m. if staying another day. 
• You must occupy your campsite the first night.
• All tents and equipment must be located within the 
designated site. 
• All vehicles must be on marked site. Use designated parking     
lots if available.
• Your site cannot be unoccupied for more than 24 hours with
out permission. 
• Carry water to your campsite for all washing. Do not use 
faucets or bathrooms for cleaning dishes, fish or personal 
items.
Campfires
• Use designated fire ring for all fires.
• Use only dead and down trees for firewood. Do not cut 
standing or live trees. 
Controlling Your Pets
• Leash your pets at all times.
• Keep your pet within your designated campsite. 
• Please remove pet litter, food or manure when you vacate 
your campsite. 
Campground Courtesy
• Quiet hours are from 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.
• Generator use is only permitted between the hours of 6:00 
a.m. and 10:00 p.m.
• Drive cautiously on campground roads and observe posted
speed limits.
• The following are prohibited here:
• Firearms and fireworks
• Alcohol and illegal drugs
• Public nudity
These regulations are required provisions of the Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations, Section 261.50(a) 
for the health and safety of the public and for the protection of the resources.  A complete list of 
Supervisor’s Orders can be found at your nearest R R anger District Office.
Make your stay more enjoyable, observe the following rules:
CAMPING RULES
RULES AND REGULATIONS ARE FOR YOUR SAFETY
FIRE SAFETY
ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT FOREST FIRES
Make sure your fire is DEAD OUT
• NEVER leave a fire unattended.
• Keep your fires small and bring your own firewood. If you have to collect firewood at 
your campsite, collect dead and down wood only. 
• Check at the local Ranger Station for current fire restrictions. 
• Use existing fire rings. Scrape away litter and any other burnable material within a 
10-foot-diameter circle surrounding the fire ring.
• Make sure all wood fits inside the fire ring.
• To put out a campfire, slowly pour water onto the fire and stir 
with a shovel until all material is cool to the touch.
• Do not bury your fire. The coals can smolder and re-ignite.
• Make sure the fire is dead out. Many wildfires have been caused 
by abandoned campfires. 
WILDERNESS
THIS IS A WILD LAND WHERE NATURE RULES
• There are hazards in this wild land. Plan ahead and prepare for 
your visit. Carry proper clothing and equipment for the weather 
and terrain.
• Expect to be self-reliant. Carry acompass and topographic map 
and know how to use them. Use your survival skills and 
knowledge of the environment to enhance your wilderness 
experience.
• Because wilderness is managed to protect its primeval 
character, trail signs, blazes and improvements such as 
footbridges are minimal, if present at all.
• No motorized or mechanized equipment or vehicles, no ATVs, 
bicycles, wagons or carts are allowed.
• Leave no trace of your visit to enhance the wilderness 
experience of future generations.
You are entering public land set aside by Congress to remain wilderness forever. 
RESPECT
mother nature
FISHING
RULES AND REGULATIONS
•A state fisihing license is required to 
fish in this national forest. 
•Trout fishing requires a trout stamp.
•A National Forest Stamp or 
Conservation Stamp may also be 
required.
•State fishing licenses and stamps are 
available at local stores.
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
file but also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated NET using this PowerPoint document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add page numbers pdf; add page numbers to pdf online
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
document file but also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated using this Word document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add page numbers to pdf; add a page to a pdf
these instances, modules will contain editable text boxes so that upon opening the file, implementers can insert site specific information 
before printing. Please note that font and type size has been pre-designed and should not be changed, unless by no other choice.
Pay attention to text
As mentioned above, many of the modules will require that site specific information be inserted.  Please pay attention to the contents 
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Codes to Sort TIFF File with .NET
manipulating multi-page TIFF (Tagged Image File), PDF, Microsoft Office If you want to add barcode into a TIFF a multi-page TIFF file with page numbers using VB
add page numbers to a pdf file; adding page numbers to a pdf document
C# Excel: Create and Draw Linear and 2D Barcodes on Excel Page
can also load document like PDF, TIFF, Word get the first page BasePage page = doc.GetPage REImage barcodeImage = linearBarcode.ToImage(); // add barcode image
adding pages to a pdf document; add page to pdf acrobat
olors
hen you create your own sign, you may need to type the RGB values of the colors in manually in Publisher to be able to follow the same 
lor scheme. 
VB.NET Image: Guide to Convert Images to Stream with DocImage SDK
Follow this guiding page to learn how to easily convert a single image or numbers of it an image processing component which can enable developers to add a wide
add pdf pages to word; add page number pdf file
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
are also available within C# Word Printer Add-on , like pages at one paper, setting the page copy numbers to be C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of Word.
adding page numbers to pdf document; add page numbers to pdf using preview
he advantage of using this system is it cuts out the cost of hiring a contractor. The modules you can edit fit into the template just as well as 
e ones you can’t. If you find that you need changes made to anything, we are more than willing to help you create what you need. 
don’t know how to use the software, and don’t have time to learn. Is there someone that can put our info boards together for 
s?
C# Excel - Excel Creating in C#.NET
document file but also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated using this Excel document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add page number to pdf in preview; add and delete pages in pdf
C#: Use XImage.OCR to Recognize MICR E-13B, OCR-A, OCR-B Fonts
may need to scan and get check characters like numbers and codes. page.RecSettings. LanguagesEnabled.Add(Language.Other); page.RecSettings.OtherLanguage
add page number to pdf file; add page numbers pdf file
can’t download the file.
the file doesn’t download, it may be because the link is broken, so wait a bit and try again. Much of the time the problem is the server. If it 
ill doesn’t work, let us know so we can look into it.
orking from the website is very slow – how can I speed it up?
hy can’t I use my own fonts?
e picked these fonts for readability and consistency and to keep with the Regional Design Guidelines. It is important to keep the same fonts 
nd their sizes to make your board look its best. If you must resize your fonts by dragging the corner of a text box, be sure to hold shift while 
u do to keep the proportions correct. 
can’t print the file.
ontact someone familiar with the printers/plotters in your office. You may need to be set up to use the printer/plotter. 
ome districts don’t have color printers to accommodate larger posters. How can I get them printed?
terpretive information might have to be limited to what you write in the “Welcome Section.”
other areas, like a picnic area or a no-fee site, there may be very little need for rules, regulations, or safety notices, so you’d be able to 
evote more space to an interpretive message.
you have an information-intensive site with lots of safety info, trail and vicinity maps, rules and regulations, plus interpretive information, you 
ight need to consider building a separate interpretive panel.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested