c# free pdf viewer : Add a page to a pdf online control SDK platform web page winforms wpf web browser ratnerfull2-part807

PHS 398 Modular Budget, Periods 1 and 2
OMB Number: 0925-0001 
1.  
Start Date:
End Date:
Budget Period:1
* Direct Cost less Consortium F&A
A. Direct Costs
B. Indirect Costs
Consortium F&A
* Total Direct Costs
Indirect Cost Type
Indirect Cost 
Rate (%)
Indirect Cost 
Base ($)
* Funds Requested ($)
Cognizant Agency (Agency Name, POC Name and Phone Number)
Indirect Cost Rate Agreement Date
Total Indirect Costs
2.  
3.  
4.  
* Funds Requested ($)
12/01/2010
11/30/2011
Res. Federal On-Campus
61
250,000.00
152,500.00
DHHS, Robert Aaronson, (212) 264-2069
07/30/2009
152,500.00
250,000.00
0.00
250,000.00
402,500.00
Funds Requested ($)
C. Total Direct and Indirect Costs (A + B)
1.  
Start Date:
End Date:
Budget Period:  2
* Direct Cost less Consortium F&A
A. Direct Costs
B. Indirect Costs
Consortium F&A
* Total Direct Costs
Indirect Cost Type
Indirect Cost 
Rate (%)
Indirect Cost 
Base ($)
* Funds Requested ($)
Cognizant Agency (Agency Name, POC Name and Phone Number)
Indirect Cost Rate Agreement Date
Total Indirect Costs
Funds Requested ($)
C. Total Direct and Indirect Costs (A + B)
2.  
3.  
4.  
* Funds Requested ($)
61
250,000.00
Res. Federal On-Campus
152,500.00
DHHS, Robert Aaronson, (212) 264-2069
152,500.00
07/30/2009
12/01/2011
11/30/2012
250,000.00
0.00
250,000.00
402,500.00
          
          !""#
  
 
Modular Budget                                                                                                Page 24
Principal Investigator/Program Director (Last, first, middle): Ratner, Adam, Jonathan
Add a page to a pdf online - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page number pdf; adding pages to a pdf
Add a page to a pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page numbers to pdf reader; add a page to a pdf file
PHS 398 Modular Budget, Periods 3 and 4
1.  
Start Date:
End Date:
Budget Period:3
* Direct Cost less Consortium F&A
A. Direct Costs
B. Indirect Costs
Consortium F&A
* Total Direct Costs
Indirect Cost Type
Indirect Cost 
Rate (%)
Indirect Cost 
Base ($)
* Funds Requested ($)
Cognizant Agency (Agency Name, POC Name and Phone Number)
Indirect Cost Rate Agreement Date
Total Indirect Costs
Funds Requested ($)
C. Total Direct and Indirect Costs (A + B)
2.  
3.  
4.  
1.  
Start Date:
End Date:
Budget Period:  4
* Direct Cost less Consortium F&A
A. Direct Costs
B. Indirect Costs
Consortium F&A
* Total Direct Costs
Indirect Cost Type
Indirect Cost 
Rate (%)
Indirect Cost 
Base ($)
* Funds Requested ($)
Cognizant Agency (Agency Name, POC Name and Phone Number)
Indirect Cost Rate Agreement Date
Total Indirect Costs
Funds Requested ($)
C. Total Direct and Indirect Costs (A + B)
2.  
3.  
4.  
* Funds Requested ($)
* Funds Requested ($)
61
250,000.00
Res. Federal On-Campus
152,500.00
07/30/2009
152,500.00
DHHS, Robert Aaronson, (212) 264-2069
11/30/2013
12/01/2012
250,000.00
0.00
250,000.00
402,500.00
152,500.00
250,000.00
61
Res. Federal On-Campus
152,500.00
07/30/2009
DHHS, Robert Aaronson, (212) 264-2069
12/01/2013
11/30/2014
250,000.00
0.00
250,000.00
402,500.00
          
          !""#
  
 
Modular Budget                                                                                                Page 25
Principal Investigator/Program Director (Last, first, middle): Ratner, Adam, Jonathan
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Access to freeware download and online VB.NET to provide users the most individualized PDF page image inserting function, allowing developers to add and insert
add page to pdf acrobat; add page number to pdf in preview
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add pages to pdf without acrobat; add page to pdf preview
PHS 398 Modular Budget, Periods 5 and Cumulative
1.  
Start Date:
End Date:
Budget Period:5
* Direct Cost less Consortium F&A
A. Direct Costs
B. Indirect Costs
Consortium F&A
* Total Direct Costs
Indirect Cost Type
Indirect Cost 
Rate (%)
Indirect Cost 
Base ($)
* Funds Requested ($)
Cognizant Agency (Agency Name, POC Name and Phone Number)
Indirect Cost Rate Agreement Date
Total Indirect Costs
Funds Requested ($)
C. Total Direct and Indirect Costs (A + B)
2.  
3.  
4.  
Cumulative Budget Information
* Funds Requested ($)
1.  Total Costs, Entire Project Period
Section A, Total Consortium F&A for Entire Project Period
*Section A, Total Direct Costs for Entire Project Period
*Section B, Total Indirect Costs for Entire Project Period
2.  Budget Justifications
1,250,000.00
0.00
1,250,000.00
762,500.00
2,012,500.00
$
$
$
$
$
Personnel Justification
Consortium Justification
Additional Narrative Justification
View Attachment
Delete Attachment
Add Attachment
1246-VLYR01A2budgetjustif.pdf
View Attachment
Delete Attachment
Add Attachment
View Attachment
Delete Attachment
Add Attachment
152,500.00
250,000.00
61
Res. Federal On-Campus
07/30/2009
152,500.00
DHHS, Robert Aaronson, (212) 264-2069
12/01/2014
11/30/2015
250,000.00
0.00
250,000.00
402,500.00
          
          !""#
  
 
Modular Budget                                                                                                Page 26
Principal Investigator/Program Director (Last, first, middle): Ratner, Adam, Jonathan
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via password by using simple VB.NET demo code. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF.
add page numbers to pdf document; add page number pdf file
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in C#.NET
add page numbers to a pdf document; adding a page to a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Please follow the sections below to learn more. DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add page to pdf; add page number to pdf online
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
adding a page to a pdf file; adding page numbers to pdf
PHS 398 Research Plan
1. Application Type:
reference, as you attach the appropriate sections of the Research Plan.
*Type of Application:
OMB Number: 0925-0001 
2. Specific Aims
3. *Research Strategy
6. Protection of Human Subjects
7. Inclusion of Women and Minorities
8. Targeted/Planned Enrollment Table
9. Inclusion of Children
10. Vertebrate Animals
13. Consortium/Contractual Arrangements
14. Letters of Support
15. Resource Sharing Plan(s)
16. Appendix
1. Introduction to Application 
(for RESUBMISSION or REVISION only)
Human Subjects Sections
2. Research Plan Attachments: 
Please attach applicable sections of the research plan, below.
Other Research Plan Sections
5. Progress Report Publication List
11. Select Agent Research
12. Multiple PD/PI Leadership Plan
4. Inclusion Enrollment Report
New
Resubmission
Renewal
Continuation
Revision
1240-VLYR01A2introduction.p
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
1241-VLYR01A2-aims.pdf
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
1242-VLYR01A2-researchstrat
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
1247-VLYR01A2-vertebrate.pd
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
1248-VLYR01A2-selectagents.p
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
1249-supportletters.pdf
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
1250-VLYR01A2sharing.pdf
Add Attachment
Delete Attachment
View Attachment
Add Attachments
Remove Attachments
View Attachments
          
          !""#
  
 
List of Research Plan Attachments                                                                             Page 28
Principal Investigator/Program Director (Last, first, middle): Ratner, Adam, Jonathan
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add page numbers pdf file; add pages to pdf preview
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings. On this page, we will talk about how to achieve this via Add necessary references
add page number to pdf reader; add pdf pages together
Gardnerella vaginalis: toxin production and pathogenesis 
SPECIFIC AIMS 
Our overall goal is to define the role of vaginolysin (VLY), a novel, human-specific toxin produced by 
Gardnerella vaginalis, in the pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV)We propose the following research plan 
directed at elucidating both genetic mechanisms of control of VLY production by G. vaginalis and the specific 
role of VLY in the interaction of G. vaginalis with host cells. Using techniques developed in our laboratory, we 
will perform the first genetic screens in G. vaginalis, define genes required for toxin production and other 
virulence properties, and construct defined mutants of G. vaginalis that express a validated, non-species-
selective VLY toxin chimera (Aim 1). We will also determine the role of VLY at the host-pathogen interface by 
characterizing VLY-specific responses of vaginal epithelial cells, including bleb formation and increased host 
cell sensitivity to complement. Both of these responses are unique to VLY and its interaction with the hCD59 
receptor, and we hypothesize that they are important to the pathogenesis of BV (Aim 2A). Finally, we will take 
advantage of our knowledge of the VLY-hCD59 interaction to develop novel in vivo models of G. vaginalis 
pathogenesis. Using defined mouse lines transgenic for hCD59 as well as VLY mutants that lack species 
selectivity, we will manipulate both host and pathogen to perform a detailed analysis of the role of VLY in vivo 
(Aims 2B-C). In addition to vastly expanding our knowledge of G. vaginalis pathogenesis and of VLY, this 
research program will address the potential to manipulate the VLY-hCD59 interaction in order to develop 
therapeutic strategies and in vivo models for bacterial vaginosis. 
Aim 1
Define determinants of Gardnerella vaginalis virulence using new genetic techniques. 
A. Determine genes required for production and regulation of VLY. 
B. Construct and evaluate specific G. vaginalis strains with altered species specificity. 
C. Determine genes required for biofilm formation in G. vaginalis
Aim 2
Determine the role of VLY in G. vaginalis at the host-pathogen interface in vitro and in vivo. 
A. Determine the role of VLY-induced membrane blebbing as a mechanism for protection of vaginal 
epithelial cells from toxin pores and as a pathway sensitizing cells to complement.  
B. Define the role of the VLY-hCD59 interaction in G. vaginalis pathogenesis in vivo. 
C. Evaluate candidate inhibitors of the VLY-hCD59 interaction in vivo. 
Specific Aims                                                                                                 Page 30
Principal Investigator/Program Director (Last, first, middle): Ratner, Adam, Jonathan
RESEARCH STRATEGY 
SIGNIFICANCE   
Bacterial vaginosis, sexually transmitted infections, and preterm birth  Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is an 
exceedingly common and poorly understood disorder associated with significant adverse sequelae. Nationwide 
point-prevalence estimates of BV among reproductive aged women are roughly 30%, corresponding to 21 
million women with BV
[2]. Rates are higher in pregnant women and in African-American populations [2]. 
Although the symptoms associated with BV are not life threatening, BV substantially increases the risk of a 
number of significant health outcomes. Chief among these is preterm 
birth (PTB). The nationwide rate of PTB (parturition at less than 37 
weeks gestation) is 12.7% (March of Dimes Peristats). BV causes 
90,000 excess preterm births per year (at an overall cost in excess of $1 
billion) and accounts for at least 30% of the racial difference in PTB 
rates [3]. In pregnancy, women with BV are at increased risk for 
chorioamnionitis, post-operative wound infections, and post-partum 
endometritis. BV increases both acquisition and shedding of a number of 
sexually transmitted infections, including HIV [4]. BV increases the risk 
of heterosexual acquisition of HIV at least 2-fold [5,6], and exposure of 
HIV-infected cells to vaginal secretions from women with BV [7] or to 
pure cultures of Gardnerella vaginalis [8,9] increases production of HIV 
transcripts and viral shedding. Synergistic interactions between BV and 
other sexually transmitted infections including herpes simplex, 
gonorrhea, and chlamydia have been detailed [10,11].   
Given its public health importance, it is striking that the pathogenesis of BV is not well understood. BV is a 
pathological state characterized by loss of the normal Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microflora and 
overgrowth of other species, especially Gardnerella vaginalis (Fig. 1). The disturbance to the vaginal 
microenvironment during BV is complex, involving alterations in pH, deficiency of components of host immunity 
[12], and a marked expansion of microbial diversity [13]. BV can be exceedingly difficult to eradicate, even with 
targeted antimicrobial therapy, and relapse rates are high, often exceeding 50% [14]. Thus, the pathogenesis 
of BV represents a substantial hole in public health-focused microbiological research. New approaches to 
prevention and treatment of BV are urgently needed. The focus of this proposal is on a novel approach to the 
pathogenesis of BV.
Gardnerella vaginalis: an enigmatic bacterial species with a controversial history  In the 1950s, Leopold 
[15] and then Gardner and Dukes [16] noted the presence of small, pleomorphic gram-variable organisms in 
the genital tracts of women with "non-specific vaginitis," an early name for BV. Believing it to be a Gram-
negative, they named the species Haemophilus vaginalis (I will continue to refer to it by its current name, 
Gardnerella vaginalis here.) In an elegant series of papers, Gardner, Dukes, and others cultivated this 
fastidious organism, demonstrated that it was present in essentially all women with BV, and established a 
causal link between the organism and the clinical syndrome [16]. The last of these goals was the most 
problematic. Using human volunteers, they showed that vaginal washes from women with BV were sufficient to 
cause BV in unaffected women [16]. Likewise, using pure cultures of G. vaginalis, Criswell et al. showed that 
the organism itself could cause BV in healthy women, albeit only in a minority of those tested [17]. From these 
early studies, it seemed that a causal link between G. vaginalis and BV had been established. Subsequent 
bacteriological characterization revealed that G. vaginalis is not a member of the Haemophilus genus and is, in 
fact, a gram-positive bacterium, lacking endotoxin and having a Gram-positive cell wall structure [18]. In 
addition, the failure to establish a model of BV by introducing cultures of G. vaginalis into laboratory animals 
dealt a blow to the notion that the G. vaginalis-BV link had fulfilled Koch's postulates. A variety of experimental 
models have been tried without success, including mice, rabbits, mares, and primates [19]. 
Why has it been so difficult to establish an animal model of this important disease? One hypothesis is 
that the cause of BV is not G. vaginalis alone — rather, that a confluence of specific microbes and host factors 
come together to cause the syndrome of BV. Indeed, this polymicrobial hypothesis is logical for a number of 
reasons: a number of women in the Criswell trials did not develop BV despite intravaginal inoculation of G. 
vaginalisthe diversity of microorganisms in BV is high and many species (both cultivatable and uncultivatable) 
are potential causative factors, and G. vaginalis can, on occasion, be found in the genital tracts of women 
without other signs of BV [20]. However, because introduction of pure cultures of G. vaginalis can cause BV in 
Fig. 1. Changes in vaginal microflora 
during bacterial vaginosis. (A) Normal 
vaginal microflora is dominated by 
Lactobacillus species (gram-positive rods). 
(B) During bacterial vaginosis, there is an 
abundance of gram-variable coccobacilli 
adherent to vaginal epithelial cells (clue 
cells). Figure adapted from [1]. 
Research Strategy                                                                                             Page 31
Principal Investigator/Program Director (Last, first, middle): Ratner, Adam, Jonathan
some women and because G. vaginalis is, even in the age of molecular testing for uncultivatable bacterial 
species, the sine qua non of BV [21,22], we hypothesize that a major factor in the failure to develop an animal 
model of BV is that the primary virulence determinant of G. vaginalis is specific to human cells.
G. vaginalis 
produces a number of potential virulence factors, including sialidase, prolidase, and a protein toxin [19].  
Cholesterol-dependent cytolysins: a widespread family of bacterial toxins with major roles in 
pathogenesis  The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family of protein toxins has more than 20 distinct 
toxins from at least six gram-positive genera. The properties of this toxin family have been reviewed [23]. 
CDCs are secreted as monomers and bind to cholesterol-containing host membranes through a mechanism 
dependent on a conserved 11 aa region (the undecapeptide) and on short loops present in the structure of 
domain 4 [24,25]. After binding, the CDCs oligomerize into a pre-pore conformation, and subsequently undergo 
a striking rearrangement by which a previously α-helical portion of the toxin becomes a β-barrel and inserts 
into the membrane, forming a pore [26,27,28,29].   
The CDCs play a major role in the pathogenesis of their cognate organisms. These toxins are produced by 
major human pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniaeS. pyogenesS. intermedius, Listeria 
monocytogenesClostridium perfringens, and Bacillus anthracis. Isogenic bacterial strains lacking the CDC 
gene have been studied in vivo and support a major role in pathogenesis. Bacteria seem to utilize CDCs for a 
variety of purposes. Listeriolysin O (LLO) from L. monocytogenes aids in escape of Listeria from the vacuole 
following activation by a host factor [30]. Streptolysin O (SLO) from S. pyogenes lyses target cells but also 
functions as a protein secretion system, delivering streptococcal NAD+ glycohydrolase to the host cytosol [31]. 
Pneumolysin (PLY) is essential to the pathogenesis of pneumococcal disease [32] and has several functions 
— pore formation, complement binding, and modulation of the host immune system in models of interbacterial 
competition [33,34]. Because host membrane cholesterol is necessary for CDC function and because 
preincubation of CDCs with cholesterol inhibits pore formation, it was hypothesized that cholesterol acts as the 
CDC receptor [35]. While cholesterol is important to CDC activity, the situation is more complicated than that. 
Intermedilysin (ILY), the CDC from Streptococcus intermedius, exhibits species specificity inconsistent with the 
use of cholesterol as a sole receptor [36]. The activity of ILY on human cells but not those of closely related 
species, including primates, prompted a search for an additional receptor. The mechanism of ILY species 
restriction depends on the ability of ILY to bind human CD59 (hCD59), a complement-regulatory molecule 
expressed on all human cells [37]. 
Vaginolysin: a novel, human-specific, CD59-dependent toxin from G. vaginalis  We recently 
characterized vaginolysin (VLY), a human-specific, CD59-dependent CDC from G. vaginalis [38]. Hemolysin 
production from G. vaginalis has been described, and some reports have demonstrated an IgA-mediated 
immune response to a Gardnerella hemolysin during BV [39,40]. However, until our studies (described below) 
detailed genetic and functional information were lacking. Among the CDCs, VLY is most closely related to ILY 
from S. intermedius, despite the distant phylogenetic relationship between these species. This relationship 
suggests a possible lateral transfer event as the mechanism of acquisition of VLY by an ancestor of 
Gardnerella [41]. We have initiated detailed investigations of VLY and its contribution to G. vaginalis virulence. 
As the second species-specific CDC, VLY provides an opportunity to expand our knowledge about this 
important group of toxins. In addition, as a human-specific virulence factor, VLY may afford a more detailed 
and nuanced understanding of the pathogenesis of BV and its adverse sequelae. The role of VLY in G. 
vaginalis pathogenesis and BV is the main focus of this proposal.
Host immunity, cytokines, and pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis  Immune responses are of paramount 
importance in BV, and dysregulation of cytokine production in response to microbial challenge is thought to be 
a major driving force in BV-associated pathogenic mechanisms. In particular, an abundance of mature 
interleukin (IL)-1β is thought to play a role in the sustained immune activation that mediates adverse sequelae 
of BV [42,43,44]. Loss of epithelial integrity as a result of chronic inflammation may also be important in BV-
related increases in susceptibility to HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Several genetic association 
studies have addressed risk factors for BV, and specific polymorphisms in cytokine genes (IL-1β and IL-8) 
have been associated with increased risk of BV [39,40]. These data demonstrate the importance of local host 
immunity in the pathogenesis of BV. Our data demonstrate a link between VLY and IL-1β production, 
consistent with VLY acting as an agent of epithelial stimulation at the vaginal mucosal surface. 
Research Strategy                                                                                             Page 32
Principal Investigator/Program Director (Last, first, middle): Ratner, Adam, Jonathan
Human CD59: more than a toxin receptor  It is striking that a 
bacterial toxin would use hCD59 as its receptor. hCD59 is a small, 
glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein that is ubiquitously 
expressed on human cells. It functions as a complement restriction 
factor, binding directly to terminal complement components C8 and 
C9, thus preventing membrane attack complex (MAC) deposition on 
the surface of human cells (Fig. 2) [45,46]. Deficiency of hCD59, 
either as a component of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria or as 
an autosomal recessive hCD59-specific deficiency, leads to 
complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes [47,48,49]. hCD59 has 
remarkable species specificity; it restricts human complement 
components but not those of other species, even other primates [50]. 
Unexpectedly, ILY and VLY appear to have co-opted this selective 
mechanism and have, as a result, drastically narrowed their host 
range compared to related CDCs. This is of particular interest 
because it has recently been proposed that CDC toxins, complement 
components, and other pore-forming molecules may be part of a 
large superfamily with shared structural motifs [51,52]. In addition to 
acting as a complement restriction factor, hCD59 localizes to lipid 
rafts and has signaling capacity [53]. Ligation of hCD59 by 
antibodies induces calcium signaling and tyrosine phosphorylation of src family kinases [54,55,56], and this 
has been hypothesized to play a role in initiation and maintenance of immune responses. Based on our 
preliminary studies, we will test the hypothesis that, in addition to using hCD59 as a receptor to initiate pore-
formation, VLY induces signaling through hCD59 that mediates proinflammatory effects and ultrastructural 
changes in epithelial cells. In addition, we propose that by sequestering hCD59 or causing its removal on 
membrane blebs, VLY removes a major protective mechanism, leaving vaginal epithelial cells vulnerable to 
attack from human complement components.  
Broadening the host range of G. vaginalis  We will use 
our knowledge of the VLY-hCD59 interaction to 
characterize new in vivo models of G. vaginalis 
pathogenesis and BV. We have produced mice transgenic 
for the hCD59 receptor and constructed a chimeric toxin 
consisting of the first three domains of VLY fused to the 
fourth domain of pneumolysin, a CDC that does not exhibit 
species selectivity. We have shown that co-delivery of a 
non-selective toxin enhances G. vaginalis colonization. By 
altering both bacteria and host, we will produce murine 
models that can be colonized by a variety of G. vaginalis 
isolates and will construct G. vaginalis strains that can 
colonize a wide range of mouse strains. These two 
strategies will address the major barrier to 
understanding the pathogenesis of BV, the absence of 
an animal model.
INNOVATION 
Our characterization of a human-specific toxin from G. 
vaginalis and its receptor on the surface of human cells 
represents an opportunity to overcome the narrow host 
range of this bacterial species. By genetically manipulating 
both microbe and host
, we will create new animal models 
for BV and understand the specific role of G. vaginalis in its 
pathogenesis. We have used innovative methods to 
generate the first descriptions of genetic manipulation of G. 
vaginalis, chimeric toxins with altered species specificity, 
and the first successful model of murine colonization with 
this organism. Our planned approach will use these tools 
Fig. 3VLY is a human-specific, hCD59-dependent toxin. (A
Neighbor-joining tree of known CDC sequences showing that VLY 
is most closely related to ILY. (B) VLY is detected as a single 
band in Western blot of G. vaginalis lysate. (C) Affinity purification 
of codon-optimized VLY from E. coli. (D) Production of VLY as 
measured by sandwich ELISA during growth of G. vaginalis. (E
VLY lyses human (hRBC) but not sheep (sRBC) erythrocytes. (F
Antibody to hCD59 but not hCD55 inhibits VLY-mediated 
hemolysis. (G) VLY lyses CHO cells transfected with hCD59 
(black bars) but not control (vector alone) CHO cells (white bars). 
Figure adapted from [38,57] and unpublished data. 
Fig. 2. Roles of human CD59.  (A) High resolution 
crystal structure of hCD59 showing GPI anchor 
(green) and complement/VLY binding site (red). 
(B) hCD59 (red) binds terminal complement 
components (blue, C8 and C9), preventing 
assembly of membrane attack complex on target 
cells. (C) VLY (green) binds hCD59 prior to 
interaction with membrane cholesterol and 
oligomerization/pore formation. 
Research Strategy                                                                                             Page 33
Principal Investigator/Program Director (Last, first, middle): Ratner, Adam, Jonathan
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested