Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century
iv
K
EY 
F
INDINGS
This report proceeds from the belief that
America should seek to preserve and extend
its position of global leadership by
maintaining the preeminence of U.S.
military forces.  Today, the United States
has an unprecedented strategic opportunity.
It faces no immediate great-power
challenge; it is blessed with wealthy,
powerful and democratic allies in every part
of the world; it is in the midst of the longest
economic expansion in its history; and its
political and economic principles are almost
universally embraced.  At no time in history
has the international security order been as
conducive to American interests and ideals.
The challenge for the coming century is to
preserve and enhance this “American
peace.”
Yet unless the United States maintains
sufficient military strength, this opportunity
will be lost.  And in fact, over the past
decade, the failure to establish a security
strategy responsive to new realities and to
provide adequate resources for the full range
of missions needed to exercise U.S. global
leadership has placed the American peace at
growing risk. This report attempts to define
those requirements.  In particular, we need
to:
E
STABLISH FOUR CORE MISSIONS
for U.S. military forces:
•  defend the American homeland;
•  fight and decisively win multiple, simultaneous major theater wars;
•  perform the “constabulary” duties associated with shaping the security environment in
critical regions;
•  transform U.S. forces to exploit the “revolution in military affairs;”
To carry out these core missions, we need to provide sufficient force and budgetary
allocations.  In particular, the United States must:
M
AINTAIN NUCLEAR STRATEGIC SUPERIORITY
, basing the U.S. nuclear deterrent upon a
global, nuclear net assessment that weighs the full range of current and emerging threats,
not merely the U.S.-Russia balance.
R
ESTORE THE PERSONNEL STRENGTH
of today’s force to roughly the levels anticipated in
the “Base Force” outlined by the Bush Administration, an increase in active-duty strength
from 1.4 million to 1.6 million.
R
EPOSITION 
U.S. 
FORCES
to respond to 21
st
century strategic realities by shifting
permanently-based forces to Southeast Europe and Southeast Asia, and by changing naval
deployment patterns to reflect growing U.S. strategic concerns in East Asia.
Add and remove pages from pdf file online - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add page number to pdf reader; add page numbers to pdf document
Add and remove pages from pdf file online - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
add page numbers pdf files; adding page numbers pdf
Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century
v
M
ODERNIZE CURRENT 
U.S. 
FORCES SELECTIVELY
, proceeding with the F-22 program while
increasing purchases of lift, electronic support and other aircraft; expanding submarine
and surface combatant fleets; purchasing Comanche helicopters and medium-weight
ground vehicles for the Army, and the V-22 Osprey “tilt-rotor” aircraft for the Marine
Corps.
C
ANCEL 
ROADBLOCK
” 
PROGRAMS
such as the Joint Strike Fighter, CVX aircraft carrier,
and Crusader howitzer system that would absorb exorbitant amounts of Pentagon funding
while providing limited improvements to current capabilities.  Savings from these canceled
programs should be used to spur the process of military transformation.
D
EVELOP AND DEPLOY GLOBAL MISSILE DEFENSES
to defend the American homeland and
American allies, and to provide a secure basis for U.S. power projection around the world.
C
ONTROL THE NEW 
INTERNATIONAL COMMONS
” 
OF SPACE AND 
CYBERSPACE
,” and pave
the way for the creation of a new military service – U.S. Space Forces – with the mission of
space control.
E
XPLOIT THE 
REVOLUTION IN MILITARY AFFAIRS
” to insure the long-term superiority of
U.S. conventional forces.  Establish a two-stage transformation process which
•  maximizes the value of current weapons systems through the application of advanced
technologies, and,
•  produces more profound improvements in military capabilities, encourages competition
between single services and joint-service experimentation efforts.
I
NCREASE DEFENSE SPENDING
gradually to a minimum level of 3.5 to 3.8 percent of gross
domestic product, adding $15 billion to $20 billion to total defense spending annually.
Fulfilling these requirements is essential
if America is to retain its militarily dominant
status for the coming decades.  Conversely,
the failure to meet any of these needs must
result in some form of strategic retreat.  At
current levels of defense spending, the only
option is to try ineffectually to “manage”
increasingly large risks: paying for today’s
needs by shortchanging tomorrow’s;
withdrawing from constabulary missions to
retain strength for large-scale wars;
“choosing” between presence in Europe or
presence in Asia; and so on.  These are bad
choices.  They are also false economies.
The “savings” from withdrawing from the
Balkans, for example, will not free up
anywhere near the magnitude of funds
needed for military modernization or
transformation.  But these are false
economies in other, more profound ways as
well.  The true cost of not meeting our
defense requirements will be a lessened
capacity for American global leadership and,
ultimately, the loss of a global security order
that is uniquely friendly to American
principles and prosperity.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Define output file path. Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" ' Remove the password. doc.Save(outputFilePath). VB: Add Password
adding page numbers to a pdf in reader; add pages to pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page Add necessary references: How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
add multi page pdf to word document; add pages to pdf online
Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century
1
I
W
HY 
A
NOTHER 
D
EFENSE 
R
EVIEW
?
Since the end of the Cold War, the
United States has struggled to formulate a
coherent national security or military
strategy, one that accounts for the constants
of American power and principles yet
accommodates 21
st
century realities.  Absent
a strategic framework, U.S. defense plan-
ning has been an empty and increasingly
self-referential exercise, often dominated by
bureaucratic and budgetary rather than
strategic interests.  Indeed, the proliferation
of defense reviews over the past decade
testifies to the failure to chart a consistent
course: to date, there have been half a dozen
formal defense reviews, and the Pentagon is
now gearing up for a second Quadrennial
Defense Review in 2001.  Unless this “QDR
II” matches U.S. military forces and
resources to a viable American strategy, it,
too, will fail.
These failures are not without cost:
already, they place at risk an historic
opportunity.  After the victories of the past
century – two world wars, the Cold War and
most recently the Gulf War – the United
States finds itself as the uniquely powerful
leader of a coalition of free and prosperous
states that faces no immediate great-power
challenge.
The American peace has proven itself
peaceful, stable and durable.  It has, over the
past decade, provided the geopolitical
framework for widespread economic growth
and the spread of American principles of
liberty and democracy.  Yet no moment in
international politics can be frozen in time;
even a global Pax Americana will not
preserve itself.
Paradoxically, as American power and
influence are at their apogee, American
military forces limp toward exhaustion,
unable to meet the demands of their many
and varied missions, including preparing for
tomorrow’s battlefield.  Today’s force,
reduced by a third or more over the past
decade, suffers from degraded combat
readiness; from difficulties in recruiting and
retaining sufficient numbers of soldiers,
sailors, airmen and Marines; from the effects
of an extended “procurement holiday” that
has resulted in the premature aging of most
weapons systems; from an increasingly
obsolescent and inadequate military
infrastructure; from a shrinking industrial
base poorly structured to be the “arsenal of
democracy” for the 21
st
century; from a lack
of innovation that threatens the techno-
logical and operational advantages enjoyed
by U.S. forces for a generation and upon
which American strategy depends.  Finally,
and most dangerously, the social fabric of
the military is frayed and worn.  U.S. armed
forces suffer from a degraded quality of life
divorced from middle-class expectations,
upon which an all-volunteer force depends.
Enlisted men and women and junior officers
increasingly lack confidence in their senior
leaders, whom they believe will not tell
unpleasant truths to their civilian leaders.  In
sum, as the American peace reaches across
the globe, the force that preserves that peace
is increasingly overwhelmed by its tasks.
This is no paradox; it is the inevitable
consequence of the failure to match military
means to geopolitical ends.  Underlying the
failed strategic and defense reviews of the
past decade is the idea that the collapse of
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
intputFilePath, userPassword); // Define output file path. Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Remove the password C# Sample Code: Add Password to Plain
add page to pdf; add page break to pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Add necessary references: Description: Delete consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified
add page numbers to pdf online; add page number to pdf preview
Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century
2
The multiple challenges of the
post-Cold War world.
the Soviet Union had created a “strategic
pause.”  In other words, until another great-
power challenger emerges, the United States
can enjoy a respite from the demands of
international leadership.  Like a boxer
between championship bouts, America can
afford to relax and live the good life, certain
that there would be enough time to shape up
for the next big challenge.  Thus the United
States could afford to reduce its military
forces, close bases overseas, halt major
weapons programs and reap the financial
benefits of the “peace dividend.”  But as we
have seen over the past decade, there has
been no shortage of powers around the
world who have taken the collapse of the
Soviet empire as an opportunity to expand
their own influence and challenge the
American-led security order.
Beyond the faulty notion of a strategic
pause, recent defense reviews have suffered
from an inverted understanding of the mili-
tary dimension of the Cold War struggle
between the United States and the Soviet
Union.  American containment strategy did
not proceed from the assumption that the
Cold War would be a purely military strug-
gle, in which the U.S. Army matched the
Red Army tank for tank; rather, the United
States would seek to deter the Soviets
militarily while defeating them economi-
cally and ideologically over time.  And,
even within the realm of military affairs, the
practice of deterrence allowed for what in
military terms is called “an economy of
force.”  The principle job of NATO forces,
for example, was to deter an invasion of
Western Europe, not to invade and occupy
the Russian heartland.  Moreover, the bi-
polar nuclear balance of terror made both
the United States and the Soviet Union
generally cautious.  Behind the smallest
proxy war in the most remote region lurked
the possibility of Armageddon.  Thus,
despite numerous miscalculations through
the five decades of Cold War, the United
States reaped an extraordinary measure of
global security and stability simply by
building a credible and, in relative terms,
inexpensive nuclear arsenal.
Over the decade of the post-Cold-War
period, however, almost everything has
changed.  The Cold War world was a bipolar
world; the 21
st
century world is – for the
moment, at least – decidedly unipolar, with
America as the world’s “sole superpower.”
America’s strategic goal used to be
containment of the Soviet Union; today the
task is to preserve an international security
environment conducive to American
interests and ideals.  The military’s job
during the Cold War was to deter Soviet
expansionism.  Today its task is to secure
and expand the “zones of democratic
peace;” to deter the rise of a new great-
power competitor; defend key regions of
Europe, East Asia and the Middle East; and
to preserve American preeminence through
the coming transformation of war made
Cold War
21
st
Century
Security
system
Bipolar
Unipolar
Strategic
goal
Contain
Soviet
Union
Preserve Pax
Americana
Main
military
mission(s)
Deter Soviet
expansionism
Secure and
expand zones
of democratic
peace; deter
rise of new
great-power
competitor;
defend key
regions;
exploit
transformation
of war
Main
military
threat(s)
Potential
global war
across many
theaters
Potential
theater wars
spread across
globe
Focus of
strategic
competition
Europe
East Asia
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
adding page numbers to pdf; add page to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
add page numbers to pdf in preview; add page numbers to pdf document in preview
Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century
3
Today, America
spends less than
3 percent of its
gross domestic
product on
national defense,
less than at any
time since before
the United States
established itself
as the world’s
leading power.
possible by new technologies.  From 1945 to
1990, U.S. forces prepared themselves for a
single, global war that might be fought
across many theaters; in the new century, the
prospect is for a variety of theater wars
around the world, against separate and
distinct adversaries pursuing separate and
distinct goals.  During the Cold War, the
main venue of superpower rivalry, the
strategic “center of gravity,” was in Europe,
where large U.S. and NATO conventional
forces prepared to repulse a Soviet attack
and over which nuclear war might begin;
and with Europe now generally at peace, the
new strategic center of concern appears to
be shifting to East Asia.  The missions for
America’s armed
forces have not
diminished so
much as shifted.
The threats may
not be as great,
but there are
more of them.
During the Cold
War, America
acquired its
security
“wholesale” by
global deterrence
of the Soviet
Union.  Today,
that same
security can only be acquired at the “retail”
level, by deterring or, when needed, by
compelling regional foes to act in ways that
protect American interests and principles.
This gap between a diverse and
expansive set of new strategic realities and
diminishing defense forces and resources
does much to explain why the Joint Chiefs
of Staff routinely declare that they see “high
risk” in executing the missions assigned to
U.S. armed forces under the government’s
declared national military strategy.  Indeed,
a JCS assessment conducted at the height of
the Kosovo air war found the risk level
“unacceptable.”  Such risks are the result of
the combination of the new missions
described above and the dramatically
reduced military force that has emerged
from the defense “drawdown” of the past
decade.  Today, America spends less than 3
percent of its gross domestic product on
national defense, less than at any time since
before World War II – in other words, since
before the United States established itself as
the world’s leading power – and a cut from
4.7 percent of GDP in 1992, the first real
post-Cold-War defense budget.  Most of this
reduction has come under the Clinton
Administration; despite initial promises to
approximate the level of defense spending
called for in the final Bush Administration
program, President Clinton cut more than
$160 billion from the Bush program from
1992 to 1996 alone.  Over the first seven
years of the Clinton Administration,
approximately $426 billion in defense
investments have been deferred, creating a
weapons procurement “bow wave” of
immense proportions.
The most immediate effect of reduced
defense spending has been a precipitate
decline in combat readiness.  Across all
services, units are reporting degraded
readiness, spare parts and personnel
shortages, postponed and simplified training
regimens, and many other problems.  In
congressional testimony, service chiefs of
staff now routinely report that their forces
are inadequate to the demands of the “two-
war” national military strategy.  Press
attention focused on these readiness
problems when it was revealed that two
Army divisions were given a “C-4” rating,
meaning they were not ready for war.  Yet it
was perhaps more telling that none of the
Army’s ten divisions achieved the highest
“C-1” rating, reflecting the widespread
effects of slipping readiness standards.  By
contrast, every division that deployed to
Operation Desert Storm in 1990 and 1991
received a “C-1” rating.  This is just a
snapshot that captures the state of U.S.
armed forces today.
These readiness problems are
exacerbated by the fact that U.S. forces are
poorly positioned to respond to today’s
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
add page to pdf preview; add or remove pages from pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
add page numbers pdf file; adding page to pdf
Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century
4
crises.  In Europe, for example, the
overwhelming majority of Army and Air
Force units remain at their Cold War bases
in Germany or England, while the security
problems on the continent have moved to
Southeast Europe.  Temporary rotations of
forces to the Balkans and elsewhere in
Southeast Europe increase the overall
burdens of these operations many times.
Likewise, the Clinton Administration has
continued the fiction that the operations of
American forces in the Persian Gulf are
merely temporary duties.  Nearly a decade
after the Gulf War, U.S. air, ground and
naval forces continue to protect enduring
American interests in the region.  In addition
to rotational naval forces, the Army
maintains what amounts to an armored
brigade in Kuwait for nine months of every
year; the Air Force has two composite air
wings in constant “no-fly zone” operations
over northern and southern Iraq.  And
despite increasing worries about the rise of
China and instability in Southeast Asia, U.S.
forces are found almost exclusively in
Northeast Asian bases.
Yet for all its problems in carrying out
today’s missions, the Pentagon has done
almost nothing to prepare for a future that
promises to be very different and potentially
much more dangerous.  It is now commonly
understood that information and other new
technologies – as well as widespread
technological and weapons proliferation –
are creating a dynamic that may threaten
America’s ability to exercise its dominant
military power.  Potential rivals such as
China are anxious to exploit these trans-
formational technologies broadly, while
adversaries like Iran, Iraq and North Korea
are rushing to develop ballistic missiles and
nuclear weapons as a deterrent to American
intervention in regions they seek to
dominate.  Yet the Defense Department and
the services have done little more than affix
a “transformation” label to programs
developed during the Cold War, while
diverting effort and attention to a process of
joint experimentation which restricts rather
than encourages innovation.  Rather than
admit that rapid technological changes
makes it uncertain which new weapons
systems to develop, the armed services cling
ever more tightly to traditional program and
concepts.  As Andrew Krepinevich, a
member of the National Defense Panel, put
it in a recent study of Pentagon experi-
mentation, “Unfortunately, the Defense
Department’s rhetoric asserting the need for
military transformation and its support for
joint experimentation has yet to be matched
by any great sense of urgency or any
substantial resource support.…At present
the Department’s effort is poorly focused
and woefully underfunded.”
In sum, the 1990s have been a “decade
of defense neglect.”  This leaves the next
president of the United States with an
enormous challenge: he must increase
military spending to preserve American
geopolitical leadership, or he must pull back
from the security commitments that are the
measure of America’s position as the
world’s sole superpower and the final
guarantee of security, democratic freedoms
and individual political rights.  This choice
will be among the first to confront the
president: new legislation requires the
incoming administration to fashion a
national security strategy within six months
of assuming office, as opposed to waiting a
full year, and to complete another
quadrennial defense review three months
after that.  In a larger sense, the new
president will choose whether today’s
“unipolar moment,” to use columnist
Charles Krauthammer’s phrase for
America’s current geopolitical preeminence,
will be extended along with the peace and
prosperity that it provides.
This study seeks to frame these choices
clearly, and to re-establish the links between
U.S. foreign policy, security strategy, force
planning and defense spending.  If an
American peace is to be maintained, and
expanded, it must have a secure foundation
on unquestioned U.S. military preeminence.
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF contains the first page and the later three pages respectively Add necessary references
adding a page to a pdf file; add page number to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET: Remove Image from PDF Page. Add necessary references
adding a page to a pdf in preview; add page to pdf without acrobat
Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century
5
None of the
defense reviews
of the past
decade has
weighed fully
the range of
missions
demanded by
U.S. global
leadership, nor
adequately
quantified the
forces and
resources
necessary to
execute these
missions
successfully.
II
F
OUR 
E
SSENTIAL 
M
ISSIONS
America’s global leadership, and its role
as the guarantor of the current great-power
peace, relies upon the safety of the
American homeland; the preservation of a
favorable balance of power in Europe, the
Middle East and surrounding energy-
producing region, and East Asia; and the
general stability of the international system
of nation-states relative to terrorists,
organized crime, and other “non-state
actors.”  The relative importance of these
elements, and the threats to U.S. interests,
may rise and fall over time.  Europe, for
example, is now extraordinarily peaceful
and stable, despite the turmoil in the
Balkans.  Conversely, East Asia appears to
be entering a period with increased potential
for instability and competition.  In the Gulf,
American power and presence has achieved
relative external security for U.S. allies, but
the longer-term prospects are murkier.
Generally, American strategy for the coming
decades should seek to consolidate the great
victories won in the 20
th
century – which
have made Germany and Japan into stable
democracies, for example – maintain
stability in the Middle East, while setting the
conditions for 21
st
-century successes,
especially in East Asia.
A retreat from any one of these
requirements would call America’s status as
the world’s leading power into question.  As
we have seen, even a small failure like that
in Somalia or a halting and incomplete
triumph as in the Balkans can cast doubt on
American credibility.  The failure to define a
coherent global security and military
strategy during the post-Cold-War period
has invited challenges; states seeking to
establish regional hegemony continue to
probe for the limits of the American security
perimeter.  None of the defense reviews of
the past decade has weighed fully the range
of missions demanded by U.S. global
leadership:  defending the homeland,
fighting and
winning multiple
large-scale wars,
conducting
constabulary
missions which
preserve the
current peace, and
transforming the
U.S. armed forces
to exploit the
“revolution in
military affairs.”
Nor have they
adequately
quantified the
forces and
resources
necessary to
execute these
missions
separately and
successfully.
While much
further detailed
analysis would be required, it is the purpose
of this study to outline the large, “full-
spectrum” forces that are necessary to
conduct the varied tasks demanded by a
strategy of American preeminence for today
and tomorrow.
Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century
6
HOMELAND DEFENSE.  America must defend its homeland.  During the Cold War,
nuclear deterrence was the key element in homeland defense; it remains essential.   But the
new century has brought with it new challenges.  While reconfiguring its nuclear force, the
United States also must counteract the effects of the proliferation of ballistic missiles and
weapons of mass destruction that may soon allow lesser states to deter U.S. military action
by threatening U.S. allies and the American homeland itself.  Of all the new and current
missions for U.S. armed forces, this must have priority.
LARGE WARS.  Second, the United States must retain sufficient forces able to rapidly
deploy and win multiple simultaneous large-scale wars and also to be able to respond to
unanticipated contingencies in regions where it does not maintain forward-based forces.
This resembles the “two-war” standard that has been the basis of U.S. force planning over
the past decade.  Yet this standard needs to be updated to account for new realities and
potential new conflicts.
CONSTABULARY DUTIES.  Third, the Pentagon must retain forces to preserve the
current peace in ways that fall short of conduction major theater campaigns.  A decade’s
experience and the policies of two administrations have shown that such forces must be
expanded to meet the needs of the new, long-term NATO mission in the Balkans, the
continuing no-fly-zone and other missions in Southwest Asia, and other presence missions in
vital regions of East Asia.  These duties are today’s most frequent missions, requiring forces
configured for combat but capable of long-term, independent constabulary operations.
T
RANSFORM 
U.S. A
RMED 
F
ORCES
 Finally, the Pentagon must begin now to exploit the so-
called “revolution in military affairs,” sparked by the introduction of advanced technologies
into military systems; this must be regarded as a separate and critical mission worthy of a
share of force structure and defense budgets.
Current American armed forces are ill-
prepared to execute these four missions.
Over the past decade, efforts to design and
build effective missile defenses have been
ill-conceived and underfunded, and the
Clinton Administration has proposed deep
reductions in U.S. nuclear forces without
sufficient analysis of the changing global
nuclear balance of forces.  While, broadly
speaking, the United States now maintains
sufficient active and reserve forces to meet
the traditional two-war standard, this is true
only in the abstract, under the most
favorable geopolitical conditions.  As the
Joint Chiefs of Staff have admitted
repeatedly in congressional testimony, they
lack the forces necessary to meet the two-
war benchmark as expressed in the warplans
of the regional commanders-in-chief.  The
requirements for major-war forces must be
reevaluated to accommodate new strategic
realities.  One of these new realities is the
requirement for peacekeeping operations;
unless this requirement is better understood,
America’s ability to fight major wars will be
jeopardized.  Likewise, the transformation
process has gotten short shrift.
To meet the requirements of the four
new missions highlighted above, the United
States must undertake a two-stage process.
The immediate task is to rebuild today’s
force, ensuring that it is equal to the tasks
before it: shaping the peacetime enviro-
nment and winning multiple, simultaneous
theater wars; these forces must be large
enough to accomplish these tasks without
running the “high” or “unacceptable” risks it
faces now.  The second task is to seriously
embark upon a transformation of the
Defense Department.  This itself will be a
two-stage effort: for the next decade or
more, the armed forces will continue to
operate many of the same systems it now
Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century
7
A new assessment of the global
nuclear balance, one that takes
account of Chinese and other nuclear
forces as well as Russian, must
precede decisions about U.S. nuclear
force cuts.
does, organize themselves in traditional
units, and employ current operational
concepts.  However, this transition period
must be a first step toward more substantial
reform.  Over the next several decades, the
United States must field a global system of
missile defenses, divine ways to control the
new “international commons” of space and
cyberspace, and build new kinds of
conventional forces for different strategic
challenges and a new technological
environment.
Nuclear Forces
Current conventional wisdom about
strategic forces in the post-Cold-War world
is captured in a comment made by the late
Les Aspin, the Clinton Administration's first
secretary of defense.  Aspin wrote that the
collapse of the Soviet Union had “literally
reversed U.S. interests in nuclear weapons”
and, “Today, if offered the magic wand to
eradicate the existence and knowledge of
nuclear weapons, we would very likely
accept it.”  Since the United States is the
world’s dominant conventional military
power, this sentiment is understandable.  But
it is precisely because we have such power
that smaller adversarial states, looking for an
equalizing advantage, are determined to
acquire their own weapons of mass
destruction.  Whatever our fondest wishes,
the reality of the today’s world is that there
is no magic wand with which to eliminate
these weapons (or, more fundamentally, the
interest in acquiring them) and that deterring
their use requires a reliable and dominant
U.S. nuclear capability.
While the formal U.S. nuclear posture
has remained conservative through the 1994
Nuclear Posture Review and the 1997
Quadrennial Defense Review, and senior
Pentagon leaders speak of the continuing
need for nuclear deterrent forces, the Clinton
Administration has taken repeated steps to
undermine the readiness and effectiveness of
U.S. nuclear forces.  In particular, it has
virtually ceased development of safer and
more effective nuclear weapons; brought
underground testing to a complete halt; and
allowed the Department of Energy’s
weapons complex and associated scientific
expertise to atrophy for lack of support.  The
administration has also made the decision to
retain current weapons in the active force for
years beyond their design life.  When
combined with the decision to cut back on
regular, non-nuclear flight and system tests
of the weapons themselves, this raises a host
of questions about the continuing safety and
reliability of the nation’s strategic arsenal.
The administration’s stewardship of the
nation's deterrent capability has been aptly
described by Congress as “erosion by
design.”
Rather than maintain and improve
America’s nuclear deterrent, the Clinton
Administration has put its faith in new arms
control measures, most notably by signing
the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty
(CTBT).  The treaty proposed a new
multilateral regime, consisting of some 150
states, whose principal effect would be to
constrain America's unique role in providing
the global nuclear umbrella that helps to
keep states like Japan and South Korea from
developing the weapons that are well within
their scientific capability, while doing little
to stem nuclear weapons proliferation.
Although the Senate refused to ratify the
treaty, the administration continues to abide
by its basic strictures.  And while it may
Rebuilding America’s Defenses: Strategy, Forces and Resources for a New Century
8
The
administration’s
stewardship of
the nation’s
deterrent
capability has
been described
by Congress as
“erosion by
design.”
make sense to continue the current
moratorium on nuclear testing for the
moment – since it would take a number of
years to refurbish the neglected testing
infrastructure in any case – ultimately this is
an untenable situation.  If the United States
is to have a nuclear deterrent that is both
effective and safe, it will need to test.
That said, of all the elements of U.S.
military force posture, perhaps none is more
in need of reevaluation than America’s
nuclear weapons.  Nuclear weapons remain
a critical component of American military
power but it is unclear whether the current
U.S. nuclear arsenal is well-suited to the
emerging post-Cold War world.  Today’s
strategic calculus encompasses more factors
than just the balance of terror between the
United States and Russia.  U.S. nuclear force
planning and related arms control policies
must take account of a larger set of variables
than in the past, including the growing
number of small
nuclear arsenals –
from North Korea
to Pakistan to,
perhaps soon,
Iran and Iraq –
and a modernized
and expanded
Chinese nuclear
force.  Moreover,
there is a question
about the role
nuclear weapons
should play in
deterring the use
of other kinds of weapons of mass destruc-
tion, such as chemical and biological, with
the U.S. having foresworn those weapons’
development and use.  It addition, there may
be a need to develop a new family of nuclear
weapons designed to address new sets of
military requirements, such as would be
required in targeting the very deep under-
ground, hardened bunkers that are being
built by many of our potential adversaries.
Nor has there been a serious analysis done
of the benefits versus the costs of maintain-
ing the traditional nuclear “triad.”  What is
needed first is a global net assessment of
what kinds and numbers of nuclear weapons
the U.S. needs to meet its security
responsibilities in a post-Soviet world.
In short, until the Department of
Defense can better define future its nuclear
requirements, significant reductions in U.S.
nuclear forces might well have unforeseen
consequences that lessen rather than
enhance the security of the United States
and its allies.  Reductions, upon review,
might be called for.  But what should finally
drive the size and character of our nuclear
forces is not numerical parity with Russian
capabilities but maintaining American
strategic superiority – and, with that
superiority, a capability to deter possible
hostile coalitions of nuclear powers.  U.S.
nuclear superiority is nothing to be ashamed
of; rather, it will be an essential element in
preserving American leadership in a more
complex and chaotic world.
Forces for Major Theater Wars
The one constant of Pentagon force
planning through the past decade has been
the recognized need to retain sufficient
combat forces to fight and win, as rapidly
and decisively as possible, multiple, nearly
simultaneous major theater wars.  This
constant is based upon two important truths
about the current international order.  One,
the Cold-War standoff between America and
its allies and the Soviet Union that made for
caution and discouraged direct aggression
against the major security interests of either
side no longer exists.  Two, conventional
warfare remains a viable way for aggressive
states to seek major changes in the
international order.
Iraq’s 1990 invasion of Kuwait reflected
both truths.  The invasion would have been
highly unlikely, if not impossible, within the
context of the Cold War, and Iraq overran
Kuwait in a matter of hours.  These two
truths revealed a third: maintaining or
restoring a favorable order in vital regions in
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested