c# free pdf viewer component : Add page to pdf Library control component asp.net web page windows mvc Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux-6-Virtualization_Administration_Guide-en-US30-part903

private
All packets are sent to the external bridge and will only be delivered to a target VM on the
same host physical machine if they are sent through an external router or gateway and that
device sends them back to the host physical machine. This procedure is followed if either
the source or destination device is in private mode.
passthrough
This feature attaches a virtual function of a SRIOV capable NIC directly to a VM without
losing the migration capability. All packets are sent to the VF/IF of the configured network
device. Depending on the capabilities of the device additional prerequisites or limitations
may apply; for example, on Linux this requires kernel 2.6.38 or newer.
Each of the four modes is configured by changing the domain xml file. Once this file is opened,
change the mode setting as shown:
<devices>
...
<interface type='direct'>
<source dev='eth0' mode='vepa'/>
</interface>
</devices>
The network access of direct attached guest virtual machines can be managed by the hardware
switch to which the physical interface of the host physical machine is connected to.
The interface can have additional parameters as shown below, if the switch is conforming to the IEEE
802.1Qbg standard. The parameters of the virtualport element are documented in more detail in the
IEEE 802.1Qbg standard. The values are network specific and should be provided by the network
administrator. In 802.1Qbg terms, the Virtual Station Interface (VSI) represents the virtual interface of
a virtual machine.
Note that IEEE 802.1Qbg requires a non-zero value for the VLAN ID. Also if the switch is conforming
to the IEEE 802.1Qbh standard, the values are network specific and should be provided by the
network administrator.
Virtual Station Interface types
managerid
The VSI Manager ID identifies the database containing the VSI type and instance
definitions. This is an integer value and the value 0 is reserved.
typeid
The VSI Type ID identifies a VSI type characterizing the network access. VSI types are
typically managed by network administrator. This is an integer value.
typeidversion
The VSI Type Version allows multiple versions of a VSI Type. This is an integer value.
instanceid
The VSI Instance ID Identifier is generated when a VSI instance (i.e. a virtual interface of a
virtual machine) is created. This is a globally unique identifier.
profileid
⁠Chapter 19. Virtual Networking
297
Add page to pdf - insert pages into PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format
add a page to a pdf; add page number to pdf
Add page to pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document
adding page numbers to a pdf file; add page number to pdf document
The profile ID contains the name of the port profile that is to be applied onto this interface.
This name is resolved by the port profile database into the network parameters from the port
profile, and those network parameters will be applied to this interface.
Each of the four types is configured by changing the domain xml file. Once this file is opened,
change the mode setting as shown:
<devices>
...
<interface type='direct'>
<source dev='eth0.2' mode='vepa'/>
<virtualport type="802.1Qbg">
<parameters managerid="11" typeid="1193047" typeidversion="2" 
instanceid="09b11c53-8b5c-4eeb-8f00-d84eaa0aaa4f"/>
</virtualport>
</interface>
</devices>
The profile ID is shown here:
<devices>
...
<interface type='direct'>
<source dev='eth0' mode='private'/>
<virtualport type='802.1Qbh'>
<parameters profileid='finance'/>
</virtualport>
</interface>
</devices>
...
19.12. Applying network filtering
This section provides an introduction to libvirt's network filters, their goals, concepts and XML format.
19.12.1. Introduction
The goal of the network filtering, is to enable administrators of a virtualized system to configure and
enforce network traffic filtering rules on virtual machines and manage the parameters of network
traffic that virtual machines are allowed to send or receive. The network traffic filtering rules are
applied on the host physical machine when a virtual machine is started. Since the filtering rules
cannot be circumvented from within the virtual machine, it makes them mandatory from the point of
view of a virtual machine user.
From the point of view of the guest virtual machine, the network filtering system allows each virtual
machine's network traffic filtering rules to be configured individually on a per interface basis. These
rules are applied on the host physical machine when the virtual machine is started and can be
modified while the virtual machine is running. The latter can be achieved by modifying the XML
description of a network filter.
Multiple virtual machines can make use of the same generic network filter. When such a filter is
modified, the network traffic filtering rules of all running virtual machines that reference this filter are
updated. The machines that are not running will update on start.
Virtualization Administration Guide
298
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
adding page numbers to a pdf in preview; add pages to pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Have a try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file. ' Open a document.
add a page to a pdf in acrobat; adding page numbers pdf file
As previously mentioned, applying network traffic filtering rules can be done on individual network
interfaces that are configured for certain types of network configurations. Supported network types
include:
network
ethernet -- must be used in bridging mode
bridge
Example 19.1. An example of network filtering
The interface XML is used to reference a top-level filter. In the following example, the interface
description references the filter clean-traffic.
<devices>
<interface type='bridge'>
<mac address='00:16:3e:5d:c7:9e'/>
<filterref filter='clean-traffic'/>
</interface>
</devices>
Network filters are written in XML and may either contain: references to other filters, rules for traffic
filtering, or hold a combination of both. The above referenced filter clean-traffic is a filter that only
contains references to other filters and no actual filtering rules. Since references to other filters can
be used, a tree of filters can be built. The clean-traffic filter can be viewed using the command: # 
virsh nwfilter-dumpxml clean-traffic.
As previously mentioned, a single network filter can be referenced by multiple virtual machines.
Since interfaces will typically have individual parameters associated with their respective traffic
filtering rules, the rules described in a filter's XML can be generalized using variables. In this case,
the variable name is used in the filter XML and the name and value are provided at the place where
the filter is referenced.
Example 19.2. Description extended
In the following example, the interface description has been extended with the parameter IP and a
dotted IP address as a value.
<devices>
<interface type='bridge'>
<mac address='00:16:3e:5d:c7:9e'/>
<filterref filter='clean-traffic'>
<parameter name='IP' value='10.0.0.1'/>
</filterref>
</interface>
</devices>
In this particular example, the clean-traffic network traffic filter will be represented with the IP
address parameter 10.0.0.1 and as per the rule dictates that all traffic from this interface will always
be using 10.0.0.1 as the source IP address, which is one of the purpose of this particular filter.
19.12.2. Filtering chains
⁠Chapter 19. Virtual Networking
299
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image
add page number to pdf reader; add page numbers to pdf using preview
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via password by using simple VB.NET demo code. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF.
adding pages to a pdf document in preview; add page numbers to a pdf file
Filtering rules are organized in filter chains. These chains can be thought of as having a tree
structure with packet filtering rules as entries in individual chains (branches).
Packets start their filter evaluation in the root chain and can then continue their evaluation in other
chains, return from those chains back into the root chain or be dropped or accepted by a filtering
rule in one of the traversed chains.
Libvirt's network filtering system automatically creates individual root chains for every virtual
machine's network interface on which the user chooses to activate traffic filtering. The user may write
filtering rules that are either directly instantiated in the root chain or may create protocol-specific
filtering chains for efficient evaluation of protocol-specific rules.
The following chains exist:
root
mac
stp (spanning tree protocol)
vlan
arp and rarp
ipv4
ipv6
Multiple chains evaluating the mac, stp, vlan, arp, rarp, ipv4, or ipv6 protocol can be created using
the protocol name only as a prefix in the chain's name.
Example 19.3. ARP traffic filtering
This example allows chains with names arp-xyz or arp-test to be specified and have their ARP
protocol packets evaluated in those chains.
The following filter XML shows an example of filtering ARP traffic in the arp chain.
<filter name='no-arp-spoofing' chain='arp' priority='-500'>
<uuid>f88f1932-debf-4aa1-9fbe-f10d3aa4bc95</uuid>
<rule action='drop' direction='out' priority='300'>
<mac match='no' srcmacaddr='$MAC'/>
</rule>
<rule action='drop' direction='out' priority='350'>
<arp match='no' arpsrcmacaddr='$MAC'/>
</rule>
<rule action='drop' direction='out' priority='400'>
<arp match='no' arpsrcipaddr='$IP'/>
</rule>
<rule action='drop' direction='in' priority='450'>
<arp opcode='Reply'/>
<arp match='no' arpdstmacaddr='$MAC'/>
</rule>
<rule action='drop' direction='in' priority='500'>
<arp match='no' arpdstipaddr='$IP'/>
</rule>
<rule action='accept' direction='inout' priority='600'>
<arp opcode='Request'/>
Virtualization Administration Guide
300
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings. On this page, we will talk about how to achieve this via Add necessary references
add a page to a pdf in reader; add page numbers pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add and delete pages in pdf; add page numbers to pdf
</rule>
<rule action='accept' direction='inout' priority='650'>
<arp opcode='Reply'/>
</rule>
<rule action='drop' direction='inout' priority='1000'/>
</filter>
The consequence of putting ARP-specific rules in the arp chain, rather than for example in the root
chain, is that packets protocols other than ARP do not need to be evaluated by ARP protocol-
specific rules. This improves the efficiency of the traffic filtering. However, one must then pay
attention to only putting filtering rules for the given protocol into the chain since other rules will not
be evaluated. For example, an IPv4 rule will not be evaluated in the ARP chain since IPv4 protocol
packets will not traverse the ARP chain.
19.12.3. Filtering chain priorities
As previously mentioned, when creating a filtering rule, all chains are connected to the root chain.
The order in which those chains are accessed is influenced by the priority of the chain. The following
table shows the chains that can be assigned a priority and their default priorities.
Table 19.1. Filtering chain default priorities values
Chain (prefix)
Default priority
stp
-810
mac
-800
vlan
-750
ipv4
-700
ipv6
-600
arp
-500
rarp
-400
Note
A chain with a lower priority value is accessed before one with a higher value.
The chains listed in 
Table 19.1, “Filtering chain default priorities values” can be also be
assigned custom priorities by writing a value in the range [-1000 to 1000] into the priority
(XML) attribute in the filter node. 
Section 19.12.2, “Filtering chains”filter shows the default
priority of -500 for arp chains, for example.
19.12.4. Usage of variables in filters
There are two variables that have been reserved for usage by the network traffic filtering subsystem:
MAC and IP.
MAC is designated for the MAC address of the network interface. A filtering rule that references this
variable will automatically be replaced with the MAC address of the interface. This works without the
user having to explicitly provide the MAC parameter. Even though it is possible to specify the MAC
parameter similar to the IP parameter above, it is discouraged since libvirt knows what MAC address
an interface will be using.
⁠Chapter 19. Virtual Networking
301
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET Project DLLs for Deleting PDF Document Page. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add page numbers to pdf document; add page to existing pdf file
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Add Sticky Note on PDF Page in C#.NET. Add necessary references:
add page number to pdf online; add pdf pages together
The parameter IP represents the IP address that the operating system inside the virtual machine is
expected to use on the given interface. The IP parameter is special in so far as the libvirt daemon will
try to determine the IP address (and thus the IP parameter's value) that is being used on an interface
if the parameter is not explicitly provided but referenced. For current limitations on IP address
detection, consult the section on limitations 
Section 19.12.12, “Limitations” on how to use this feature
and what to expect when using it. The XML file shown in 
Section 19.12.2, “Filtering chains” contains
the filter no-arp-spoofing, which is an example of using a network filter XML to reference the MAC
and IP variables.
Note that referenced variables are always prefixed with the character $. The format of the value of a
variable must be of the type expected by the filter attribute identified in the XML. In the above example,
the IP parameter must hold a legal IP address in standard format. Failure to provide the correct
structure will result in the filter variable not being replaced with a value and will prevent a virtual
machine from starting or will prevent an interface from attaching when hotplugging is being used.
Some of the types that are expected for each XML attribute are shown in the example 
Example 19.4,
“Sample variable types”.
Example 19.4. Sample variable types
As variables can contain lists of elements, (the variable IP can contain multiple IP addresses that
are valid on a particular interface, for example), the notation for providing multiple elements for the
IP variable is:
<devices>
<interface type='bridge'>
<mac address='00:16:3e:5d:c7:9e'/>
<filterref filter='clean-traffic'>
<parameter name='IP' value='10.0.0.1'/>
<parameter name='IP' value='10.0.0.2'/>
<parameter name='IP' value='10.0.0.3'/>
</filterref>
</interface>
</devices>
This XML file creates filters to enable multiple IP addresses per interface. Each of the IP addresses
will result in a seperate filtering rule. Therefore using the XML above and the the following rule,
three individual filtering rules (one for each IP address) will be created:
<rule action='accept' direction='in' priority='500'>
<tcp srpipaddr='$IP'/>
</rule>
As it is possible to access individual elements of a variable holding a list of elements, a filtering
rule like the following accesses the 2nd element of the variable DSTPORTS.
<rule action='accept' direction='in' priority='500'>
<udp dstportstart='$DSTPORTS[1]'/>
</rule>
Example 19.5. Using a variety of variables
As it is possible to create filtering rules that represent all possible combinations of rules from
different lists using the notation $VARIABLE[@<iterator id="x">]. The following rule allows
Virtualization Administration Guide
302
a virtual machine to receive traffic on a set of ports, which are specified in DSTPORTS, from the set
of source IP address specified in SRCIPADDRESSES. The rule generates all combinations of
elements of the variable DSTPORTS with those of SRCIPADDRESSES by using two independent
iterators to access their elements.
<rule action='accept' direction='in' priority='500'>
<ip srcipaddr='$SRCIPADDRESSES[@1]' dstportstart='$DSTPORTS[@2]'/>
</rule>
Assign concrete values to SRCIPADDRESSES and DSTPORTS as shown:
SRCIPADDRESSES = [ 10.0.0.1, 11.1.2.3 ]
DSTPORTS = [ 80, 8080 ]
Assigning values to the variables using $SRCIPADDRESSES[@1] and $DSTPORTS[@2] would
then result in all combinations of addresses and ports being created as shown:
10.0.0.1, 80
10.0.0.1, 8080
11.1.2.3, 80
11.1.2.3, 8080
Accessing the same variables using a single iterator, for example by using the notation 
$SRCIPADDRESSES[@1] and $DSTPORTS[@1], would result in parallel access to both lists
and result in the following combination:
10.0.0.1, 80
11.1.2.3, 8080
Note
$VARIABLE is short-hand for $VARIABLE[@0]. The former notation always assumes the role
of iterator with iterator id="0" added as shown in the opening paragraph at the top of
this section.
19.12.5. Automatic IP address detection and DHCP snooping
19.12.5.1. Introduction
The detection of IP addresses used on a virtual machine's interface is automatically activated if the
variable IP is referenced but no value has been assigned to it. The variable CTRL_IP_LEARNING
can be used to specify the IP address learning method to use. Valid values include: anydhcp, or
none.
The value any instructs libvirt to use any packet to determine the address in use by a virtual machine,
which is the default setting if the variable TRL_IP_LEARNING is not set. This method will only detect
a single IP address per interface. Once a guest virtual machine's IP address has been detected, its IP
network traffic will be locked to that address, if for example, IP address spoofing is prevented by one
of its filters. In that case, the user of the VM will not be able to change the IP address on the interface
⁠Chapter 19. Virtual Networking
303
inside the guest virtual machine, which would be considered IP address spoofing. When a guest
virtual machine is migrated to another host physical machine or resumed after a suspend operation,
the first packet sent by the guest virtual machine will again determine the IP address that the guest
virtual machine can use on a particular interface.
The value of dhcp instructs libvirt to only honor DHCP server-assigned addresses with valid leases.
This method supports the detection and usage of multiple IP address per interface. When a guest
virtual machine resumes after a suspend operation, any valid IP address leases are applied to its
filters. Otherwise the guest virtual machine is expected to use DHCP to obtain a new IP addresses.
When a guest virtual machine migrates to another physical host physical machine, the guest virtual
machine is required to re-run the DHCP protocol.
If CTRL_IP_LEARNING is set to none, libvirt does not do IP address learning and referencing IP
without assigning it an explicit value is an error.
19.12.5.2. DHCP snooping
CTRL_IP_LEARNING=dhcp (DHCP snooping) provides additional anti-spoofing security,
especially when combined with a filter allowing only trusted DHCP servers to assign IP addresses.
To enable this, set the variable DHCPSERVER to the IP address of a valid DHCP server and provide
filters that use this variable to filter incoming DHCP responses.
When DHCP snooping is enabled and the DHCP lease expires, the guest virtual machine will no
longer be able to use the IP address until it acquires a new, valid lease from a DHCP server. If the
guest virtual machine is migrated, it must get a new valid DHCP lease to use an IP address (e.g., by
bringing the VM interface down and up again).
Note
Automatic DHCP detection listens to the DHCP traffic the guest virtual machine exchanges with
the DHCP server of the infrastructure. To avoid denial-of-service attacks on libvirt, the
evaluation of those packets is rate-limited, meaning that a guest virtual machine sending an
excessive number of DHCP packets per second on an interface will not have all of those
packets evaluated and thus filters may not get adapted. Normal DHCP client behavior is
assumed to send a low number of DHCP packets per second. Further, it is important to setup
appropriate filters on all guest virtual machines in the infrastructure to avoid them being able
to send DHCP packets. Therefore guest virtual machines must either be prevented from
sending UDP and TCP traffic from port 67 to port 68 or the DHCPSERVER variable should be
used on all guest virtual machines to restrict DHCP server messages to only be allowed to
originate from trusted DHCP servers. At the same time anti-spoofing prevention must be
enabled on all guest virtual machines in the subnet.
Example 19.6. Activating IPs for DHCP snooping
The following XML provides an example for the activation of IP address learning using the DHCP
snooping method:
<interface type='bridge'>
<source bridge='virbr0'/>
<filterref filter='clean-traffic'>
<parameter name='CTRL_IP_LEARNING' value='dhcp'/>
</filterref>
</interface>
Virtualization Administration Guide
304
19.12.6. Reserved Variables
Table 19.2, “Reserved variables” shows the variables that are considered reserved and are used by
libvirt:
Table 19.2. Reserved variables
Variable Name
Definition
MAC
The MAC address of the interface
IP
The list of IP addresses in use by an interface
IPV6
Not currently implemented: the list of IPV6
addresses in use by an interface
DHCPSERVER
The list of IP addresses of trusted DHCP servers
DHCPSERVERV6
Not currently implemented: The list of IPv6
addresses of trusted DHCP servers
CTRL_IP_LEARNING
The choice of the IP address detection mode
19.12.7. Element and attribute overview
The root element required for all network filters is named <filter> with two possible attributes. The 
name attribute provides a unique name of the given filter. The chain attribute is optional but allows
certain filters to be better organized for more efficient processing by the firewall subsystem of the
underlying host physical machine. Currently the system only supports the following chains: root
ipv4ipv6arp and rarp.
19.12.8. References to other filters
Any filter may hold references to other filters. Individual filters may be referenced multiple times in a
filter tree but references between filters must not introduce loops.
Example 19.7. An Example of a clean traffic filter
The following shows the XML of the clean-traffic network filter referencing several other filters.
<filter name='clean-traffic'>
<uuid>6ef53069-ba34-94a0-d33d-17751b9b8cb1</uuid>
<filterref filter='no-mac-spoofing'/>
<filterref filter='no-ip-spoofing'/>
<filterref filter='allow-incoming-ipv4'/>
<filterref filter='no-arp-spoofing'/>
<filterref filter='no-other-l2-traffic'/>
<filterref filter='qemu-announce-self'/>
</filter>
To reference another filter, the XML node filterref needs to be provided inside a filter node. This
node must have the attribute filter whose value contains the name of the filter to be referenced.
⁠Chapter 19. Virtual Networking
305
New network filters can be defined at any time and may contain references to network filters that are
not known to libvirt, yet. However, once a virtual machine is started or a network interface referencing
a filter is to be hotplugged, all network filters in the filter tree must be available. Otherwise the virtual
machine will not start or the network interface cannot be attached.
19.12.9. Filter rules
The following XML shows a simple example of a network traffic filter implementing a rule to drop traffic
if the IP address (provided through the value of the variable IP) in an outgoing IP packet is not the
expected one, thus preventing IP address spoofing by the VM.
Example 19.8. Example of network traffic filtering
<filter name='no-ip-spoofing' chain='ipv4'>
<uuid>fce8ae33-e69e-83bf-262e-30786c1f8072</uuid>
<rule action='drop' direction='out' priority='500'>
<ip match='no' srcipaddr='$IP'/>
</rule>
</filter>
The traffic filtering rule starts with the rule node. This node may contain up to three of the following
attributes:
action is mandatory can have the following values:
drop (matching the rule silently discards the packet with no further analysis)
reject (matching the rule generates an ICMP reject message with no further analysis)
accept (matching the rule accepts the packet with no further analysis)
return (matching the rule passes this filter, but returns control to the calling filter for further
analysis)
continue (matching the rule goes on to the next rule for further analysis)
direction is mandatory can have the following values:
in for incomming traffic
out for outgoing traffic
inout for incoming and outgoing traffic
priority is optional. The priority of the rule controls the order in which the rule will be instantiated
relative to other rules. Rules with lower values will be instantiated before rules with higher values.
Valid values are in the range of -1000 to 1000. If this attribute is not provided, priority 500 will be
assigned by default. Note that filtering rules in the root chain are sorted with filters connected to
the root chain following their priorities. This allows to interleave filtering rules with access to filter
chains. Refer to 
Section 19.12.3, “Filtering chain priorities” for more information.
statematch is optional. Possible values are '0' or 'false' to turn the underlying connection state
matching off. The default setting is 'true' or 1
For more information see 
Section 19.12.11, “Advanced Filter Configuration Topics”.
The above example 
Example 19.7, “An Example of a clean traffic filter” indicates that the traffic of type
Virtualization Administration Guide
306
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested