© 2013 Taylor & Francis, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, UK, OX14 4RN 
21 
Preparing your manuscript for submission 
Each chapter in your book should be supplied as a separate file. 
Provide a word count by chapter of all files. 
How to name files 
File names should be numbered, consistent and clear. 
The following is an example of well-named set of files: 
00_Prelims.doc 
01_Chapter1.doc 
02_Chapter2.doc 
02_Chapter2_tables.doc 
03_Chapter3.doc 
03_Chapter3_boxes.doc 
04_Chapter4.doc 
A more complex book structure might be named as follows: 
00a_Prelims.doc 
00b_Introduction.doc 
00c_Part1_titlepage.doc 
01_Chapter1.doc 
02_Chapter2.doc 
03_Part2_titlepage.doc 
04_Chapter3.doc 
How to enter endnotes 
Endnotes should be entered into your manuscript using the Word note function rather than 
numbered text at the end of the document. Not only does this allow us to process the notes more 
accurately and efficiently, it also ensures that the numbering is consistent. 
Special characters 
Please note that we are not permitted to accept separate font files. If your manuscript contains 
special characters (e.g. Chinese, Japanese, Hebrew, Arabic, Greek, Cyrillic, characters not generally 
used in Western European languages, symbols, mathematics, IPA characters, etc.) then you should 
also submit a PDF version of your manuscript and list the special fonts used. This allows us, the copy-
editor, and the typesetter to know what these characters are if we do not have the same font you 
used to display them. Please note that it is your responsibility to check any such special characters in 
the proofs. 
Delete pages from a pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete blank page in pdf; add and delete pages in pdf online
Delete pages from a pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf file; delete pdf pages reader
© 2013 Taylor & Francis, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, UK, OX14 4RN 
Taylor & Francis Books Instructions to Authors 
22 
If some chapters do not contain special characters then there is no need to submit a PDF for those 
chapters. 
Figures, tables and boxes 
Figures, tables and ͚floating͛ boxed text should not be supplied embedded into the manuscript 
itself but rather supplied as separate files.  
Save each figure/table/box in a separate file and name them by chapter – i.e., Figure 1.1, 1.2; 
Table 2.1, 2.2  etc.   
Ensure that you place a call-out in the manuscript to indicate where each figure/table/box 
should be placed – e.g.,  
<FIGURE 1.1 HERE> 
Note that figures, tables and boxes cannot necessarily be placed in the exact location indicated, 
but rather will be placed as close as possible to that point. 
Ensure that the numbering of your call-outs matches exactly the file numbering of your 
figures/tables/boxes so that there is no confusion about which figure etc is being referred to.  
If you wish to include a list of figures, tables or boxes in the front matter, include this separately 
in the front matter file that you supply. 
Figures 
Do not embed figures into the manuscript as this can lead to problems with the quality with 
which they can be reproduced. 
Supply figures in the format in which they were created and at as high a resolution as possible. 
If you have drawn figures within a package like Microsoft Word, then still provide these in a 
separate file.  
Full details on the supply of images, which file types to use, and other useful information can be 
found in How To Supply Artwork on page 35. 
Supply captions, notes and source information for figures as a separate file – avoid making them 
part of the image itself. Source lines should either be included with the caption or separately in 
an Acknowledgements or Credits page in the front matter. 
Tables 
Supply tables separately rather than embedded into the manuscript file. However, it is perfectly 
acceptable (and often easier) to supply the tables grouped together in one file per chapter. 
It is best to format tables as true tables (e.g., using Microsoft Word͛s ͚Insert Table͛ function) 
rather than using another method. Avoid the following, as they can make processing 
problematic and subject to error: 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Deleting Pages. You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well. Sorting Pages.
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete pages in pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page on pdf reader; delete page on pdf file
© 2013 Taylor & Francis, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, UK, OX14 4RN 
23 
Preparing your manuscript for submission 
o
the use of tabs to create pseudo-columns; 
o
the use of a proper table, but rows created using returns or line breaks rather than 
inserting a new row in the table; 
o
a table supplied as an image; 
o
tables with so many columns that it cannot fit on a page. 
Include the caption with the table and list any source line beneath the table. 
Boxes 
If your book contains boxed text, then the type of boxed text it is affects how it should be supplied. 
There are two main types of boxes: in-line and floating.  
In-line 
In-line boxes flow on from the main text in a fixed position because they have to appear in a certain 
place (say, between two particular paragraphs of the main text). This type of box should be 
presented in the main manuscript file in its desired location, but styled in such a way as to make it 
clear that it is boxed text. Indicate on submission if boxes must appear exactly where they are placed 
in the manuscript. 
Floating 
Floating boxes have no fixed position, but rather are positioned in much the same way as a figure or 
table – usually as close as possible to a citation in the main text or a paragraph that pertains to it. 
This type of box is best supplied in a separate file or files with a call-out in the main manuscript and 
is usually numbered (in much the same way as tables should be supplied and likewise numbered). 
For example, floating boxes are often used for case studies as these should be separate from the 
main body of the text. If boxes are captioned, include the caption with the box and list any source 
line at the end of the boxed text. 
Comments, notes and instructions in the manuscript 
Do not insert comments (such as Microsoft Word͛s comment boxes) into your final manuscript files. 
If you do need to give specific instructions  (for example, if a line of poetry must align at a particular 
point relative to the line above, or a certain word is intentionally spelled incorrectly), please supply 
these separately.  
Mathematics, formulae and equations 
If a very simple formula or equation is needed in your manuscript then it can be inserted into the 
body text, but you should use the proper mathematical characters (i.e. × (multiplication sign) instead 
of the letter ͚x͛, − (minus sign) instead of a hyphen, etc.) and standard mathematical notational style, 
i.e. italic for variables, roman for constants, bold for vectors and matrices, etc. It is fine to use a 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
note, PDF file will be divided from the previous page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages.
copy pages from pdf to word; delete pages pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Moreover, you may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a PDFDocument object at user-defined position.
cut pages from pdf reader; delete page pdf online
© 2013 Taylor & Francis, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, UK, OX14 4RN 
Taylor & Francis Books Instructions to Authors 
24 
solidus (/) rather than a division sign, with parentheses if necessary to avoid ambiguity (e.g. 
͚1/(n+1)͛). Word processing packages normally allow you to insert symbol characters, or alternatively 
you can use the Windows ͚ haracter Map͛ to find and select the character you wish. 
Fuller formulae or equations should be displayed (inserted on a separate line). If you are working in 
Word, it is best to insert these using an equation editor. Note that a solidus is not generally used for 
display formulae or equations – a horizontal line is preferred.  Displayed equations should be 
numbered serially but only if they are referred to in the text. Use the decimal system and number 
them sequentially by chapter on the right hand side of the page. For example: 
2x
+ 7y + 8 = 17  
(1.1) 
Braces,  brackets  and  parentheses  are  used  in  the  order  {[()]}  –  except  where  mathematical 
convention  dictates  otherwise  (e.g.  parentheses  or  square  brackets  for  different  types  of 
mathematical interval). 
Please note that although the copy-editor working on books containing equations will be familiar 
with mathematical notation, they will not usually be expected to verify the formulae, so it is your 
responsibility to ensure that the mathematics in your manuscript is correct. 
LaTeX 
We are able to accept manuscripts prepared using LaTeX software; we do not supply a specific 
template for this, so any template you wish to use will usually be acceptable. Please submit all your 
TEX files, and if possible any CLS, STY and BIB files that you have used, and any separate artwork 
files. Please note we are unable to use DVI files. We also require a corresponding PDF of the whole 
book (most TeX packages will allow you to output a PDF as part of the process). 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively will also take up too much space, glyph file unreferenced can Delete unimportant contents
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages from a pdf in preview
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Compress large-size PDF document of 1000+ pages to smaller one in a Delete unimportant contents: C# Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET
delete blank pages in pdf; add or remove pages from pdf
© 2013 Taylor & Francis, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, UK, OX14 4RN 
4.
Editorial style/conventions 
General editorial style  
Use a style appropriate to your discipline as a guide for spelling, capitalization, notes and references, 
etc. 
If you have followed a specific style guide (e.g., Chicago or Harvard), confirm the style you͛ve used 
when submitting your final manuscript. Whichever style you use it is important to ensure that you 
follow it consistently throughout the book – for example, in the use of: 
Spellings 
Hyphenation 
Serial comma  
Capitalization 
Italics  
Abbreviations/acronyms 
Numerals (written or spelt out) 
Punctuation of lists  
References (see further below) 
Include any specific notes to the copy-editor when you submit your final manuscript. 
Some general guidelines are listed below. 
Notes on UK style 
For further guidance, you can refer to Butcher's Copy-editing: The Cambridge Handbook for 
Editors, Copy-editors and Proofreaders
by Judith Butcher, Caroline Drake and Maureen Leach, 
and the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors: The Essential A-Z Guide to the Written 
Word, Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
For British spelling our usual reference is the Concise Oxford English Dictionary, but we will 
accept alternatives as long as they are consistent.  
For referencing, please use the Harvard referencing system.  This uses a basic Author-Date 
method of referencing. 
There are numerous websites outlining the Harvard referencing system in more detail. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF File by Number of Pages Demo Code in VB.NET. This is an VB.NET example of splitting a PDF file into multiple ones by number of pages.
best pdf editor delete pages; delete pages pdf online
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Professional C#.NET PDF SDK for merging PDF file merging in Visual Studio .NET. Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET
cut pages out of pdf; delete page from pdf document
© 2013 Taylor & Francis, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, UK, OX14 4RN 
Taylor & Francis Books Instructions to Authors 
26 
Notes on US style 
For US spelling Webster͛s New Collegiate Dictionary or Webster͛s Third New International 
Dictionary are the standard references.  
There are different style preferences for different subject areas, such as Chicago or APA. Your 
Editorial Assistant will advise which style you should follow. 
Confirm the style you have used when submitting your final manuscript. 
Front matter 
The front matter should be saved as a single text file. This material is placed before the main text 
and may include some or all of the following in the order listed below: 
Title page – should carry the exact final wording of the title (and sub-title, if any), and author or 
editor name in the form you wish it to be used. If you are editor, state ͚Edited by͛. 
Dedication – if included. 
Table of Contents - must be final and match wording and capitalization with the chapter 
headings in the text. 
o
If the book is divided into parts, include the part numbers and part titles in both the Table 
of Contents and the main text. 
o
If the book is an edited collection, list contributor names below each chapter title and 
ensure they match the contributor names cited with the chapter headings in the text. 
Lists of figures, maps, tables or cases – include if appropriate. 
Foreword (or Series Editor Introduction) – if appropriate, not essential. An invited piece written 
by a luminary figure in the field. If the book is in a series, the series editor may write an 
introduction. 
Preface – if appropriate, not essential. A personal piece written by the author explaining how 
the book came to be written, or as a brief apologia. A longer, detailed analysis of the subjects to 
be covered in the book should be treated as an Introduction. 
Acknowledgements or Credits List – if appropriate.  
List of abbreviations – if appropriate. 
List of contributors – must be included in edited collections. Include names and affiliations and, 
if appropriate, short biography. This can also be placed in the back matter for some US titles. 
Ensure the names are presented in exactly the same way as in the Table of Contents and 
Chapter headings. 
Subheadings 
We prefer the use of Word styles to indicate different levels of headings. 
If you cannot use Word styles, please ensure that you present headings consistently with 
different levels of headings clearly differentiated. For example, use bold for level 1 subheadings, 
italics for level 2 subheadings, and roman for level 3 subheadings, i.e.: 
© 2013 Taylor & Francis, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, UK, OX14 4RN 
27 
Editorial style / conventions 
Subheading level 1 
Subheading level 2 
Subheading level 3 
Avoid using all capitals for subheadings as this makes it hard to see which words you prefer to 
be capitalized. 
Avoid using more than 3 levels of subheadings. 
Avoid numbering subheadings unless extensive cross-referencing is essential to the book or it is 
appropriate to your discipline.  
Bibliography/reference lists 
General rules  
The reference list/bibliography for each chapter should be placed at the end of each chapter. 
Do not provide a single reference list/bibliography at the back of the book. This will give readers 
the additional option of accessing your book by chapter. 
Ensure that your references are consistently presented in terms of: the order in which details 
are listed; use of capitalization; use of italics and punctuation. 
Book and journal titles should always be in italics, regardless of which style guide you are 
following. 
Ensure that each entry includes all publication details as applicable: author/editor name(s) and 
initials; date of publication; book or article title; journal title and volume number; place of 
publication; publisher; page numbers for chapter or journal articles. 
It is essential that the reference list/bibliography includes every work cited by you in the text.  
Please ensure you check that the date for each entry in the reference list/bibliography 
matches the date cited in the text reference. This will avoid time-consuming queries at copy-
editing stage. 
Notes 
We prefer a dedicated bibliography or reference list rather than end notes containing references. 
The reason is that if a referenced work appears in a dedicated bibliography or reference section, we 
can create direct links to the works cited anywhere your text appears online. This is not possible with 
note references. 
If you do use end notes we prefer these to be discursive notes that simply expand on the text. 
© 2013 Taylor & Francis, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, UK, OX14 4RN 
Taylor & Francis Books Instructions to Authors 
28 
Our house style is to have notes numbered from 1 at the start of each chapter rather than the 
numbers running throughout the entire book. Our style is also to have endnotes rather than 
footnotes.  The exception is law titles where either style is acceptable as long as consistent within 
the book. For additional information please check with your Commissioning Editor. 
Place notes at the end of each chapter, starting at ͞1͟ for each chapter. 
End matter 
This can include some or all of the following in the order listed below: 
Appendices 
Glossary 
Index (usually compiled at proof stage – see page 51) 
List of Contributors (if not included in front matter) 
Abstracts 
With the increase in electronic sales and ongoing digital developments, we are seeking to make all of 
our books more accessible in electronic format. As such we are very keen for all our books – both 
authored titles and edited collections – to have chapter-by-chapter abstracts in order to make our 
book content more searchable online. These abstracts will not appear in the print edition, but will be 
used to better market the book to potential readers online and in future electronic developments. 
Each abstract  should  be  a  summary  of,  rather  than  an  introduction  to,  each  chapter  and 
comprise no more than 70–100 words. It should detail the main argument and findings of the 
chapter in clear and unambiguous terms and explain why a person should read it. 
For  textbooks,  the  abstract  should  be  based  on  the  learning  outcomes  for  each  chapter 
together  with a group of  key words – in total  comprising  between  50 and  150 words  per 
chapter. 
Supply your complete set of final abstracts as a single Word file separate to your manuscript.  
© 2013 Taylor & Francis, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, UK, OX14 4RN 
5.
Libel 
At Taylor & Francis we expect that our authors͛ work will always conform to the highest scholarly 
standards. Therefore, we require our authors to undertake that their work will contain nothing 
which is defamatory, and that all statements purporting to be facts are true; and moreover that the 
truth of such statements can be demonstrated by providing references where appropriate to source 
material, or can otherwise be justified. If these undertakings are complied with, then the risk of 
libel/defamation should be greatly reduced. 
Occasionally we are faced with cases where libel/defamation is alleged. Such cases, even where the 
allegation cannot be supported, are worrying, troublesome and time-consuming. They can also be 
very expensive in that we may need to take legal advice, even on what may seem to be trivial points. 
Also, there may be substantial costs involved in delaying publication, or withdrawing copies already 
printed. It is important to avoid any risk, even of libel being alleged, if at all possible. Therefore, if 
you have any reason whatsoever for thinking that any part of your work may be libellous or 
defamatory, please raise the matter with your Commissioning Editor without delay. 
Even where the author has given a warranty and indemnity against any risk of defamation, it is very 
likely that Taylor & Francis, as well as the author, would be joined as a co-defendant in any claim for 
libel/defamation and, if the claim succeeds, damages may be awarded against us. In addition, an 
injunction may be granted requiring us to take copies off sale, or preventing us from publishing at 
all. Therefore, we will not publish your work if there is any suspicion that material may be libellous 
or defamatory. 
The warranty and indemnity clause in our author contract 
In order to demonstrate to our authors that libel/defamation is a serious matter, and in order to 
demonstrate, if necessary, in our own defence in court, that we take our responsibilities at Taylor & 
Francis seriously, we require all our authors to warrant to us that the work ͚contains nothing ... 
defamatory͛ and ͚that all statements contained therein purporting to be facts are true͛. This 
warranty, which forms part of the contract which we ask all authors to sign, goes on to commit the 
author to indemnifying Taylor & Francis ͚against all losses, injury or damage and actions, claims, 
costs and proceedings (including legal costs and expenses and any compensation costs and 
disbursements paid by the Publishers on the advice of their legal advisers to compromise or settle 
any claim) occasioned to the Publishers in consequence of any breach or claimed breach of this 
warranty͛. 
In other words, if Taylor & Francis are sued for any defamation contained in the work, in breach of 
the warranty, and lose, we can reclaim the full amount of any award of damages against us and our 
legal costs from the author. In addition – and this is why it is particularly important that statements 
where there is any doubt at all about defamation get removed – we can reclaim our costs from 
© 2013 Taylor & Francis, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, UK, OX14 4RN 
Taylor & Francis Books Instructions to Authors 
30 
authors in those cases where there is an ͚out of court settlement͛ and where the issue of whether a 
statement is defamatory may not always be completely resolved. 
Although this warranty and indemnity may seem a little heavy-handed, the alternative – of not 
having a warranty – could leave Taylor & Francis open to the charge that we publish negligently, 
recklessly and without due care. In addition, our contracts with authors must make it clear that 
Taylor & Francis cannot be obliged to publish material which may be unlawful. Please note that 
these clauses in our author contract are not unique to Taylor & Francis and are in line with general 
publishing practice. 
Definitions of defamation 
͚A statement concerning any person which exposes him to hatred, ridicule or contempt, or 
which causes him to be shunned or avoided, or which has a tendency to injure him in his office, 
profession or trade͛. 
͚A publication to a third party of matter which in all the circumstances would be likely to lower a 
person͛s reputation in the eyes of right-thinking members of society generally͛. 
The above definitions are tests currently applied under English law. However, defamation varies 
from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. This is important because Taylor & Francis books are published 
worldwide and libel actions may be brought in more than one territory, depending on where 
publication takes place. Local laws will apply in each case: for example, in France it is possible to libel 
the dead if the deceased͛s friends and relations are affected by the alleged libel. In some other 
jurisdictions, libel/defamation is a criminal offence. Although English law applies the highest 
standards, it may still be necessary to take the advice of local foreign lawyers. 
Examples of where libel/defamation might arise 
Although it is libel/defamation involving politicians and show business personalities which makes the 
headlines, in our experience allegations of libel/defamation can arise in all sorts of unlikely and 
unexpected places. Statements about political figures have indeed been a problem for us, and so too 
have statements about the political bias of news organizations, about the professionalism or 
otherwise of professionals in their professional area, and about the sexual orientation of (named) 
ordinary individuals. Other examples include the alleged political extremism of leading 
educationalists and referring to some people as criminals when their convictions were overturned 
on appeal (in the interval between completion of the script and publication). In all these real 
examples, proper attention to detail and proper application by the authors of their undertakings that 
their work will contain nothing which is defamatory, and that all statements purporting to be facts 
are true, would have saved a great deal of time, trouble and expense. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested