c# itextsharp pdfreader not opened with owner password : Delete pages from pdf in reader control SDK platform web page wpf html web browser TG_97801954714030-part1027

1
Teacher’s Guide
Delete pages from pdf in reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete a page from a pdf file; delete pdf pages
Delete pages from pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf reader; delete pdf pages in reader
1
Great Clarendon Street, Oxford 
OX
2 6
DP
Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford.
It furthers the University’s objective of excellence in research, scholarship,
and education by publishing worldwide in
Oxford  New York
Auckland   Cape Town   Dar es Salaam   Hong Kong   Karachi   Kuala Lumpur
Madrid   Melbourne   Mexico City   Nairobi   New Delhi   Shanghai   Taipei   Toronto
With offices in
Argentina   Austria   Brazil    Chile   Czech Republic   France   Greece
Guatemala   Hungary   Italy   Japan   Poland   Portugal   Singapore
South Korea   Switzerland   Turkey   Ukraine   Vietnam
Oxford is a registered trademark of Oxford University Press
in the UK and in certain other countries.
© Oxford University Press 2008
The moral rights of the author have been asserted.
First published 2008
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, translated,
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means,
without the prior permission in writing of Oxford University Press.
Enquiries concerning reproduction should be sent to
Oxford University Press at the address below.
This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way
of trade or otherwise, be lent, resold, hired out or otherwise circulated
without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover
other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition
including this condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser.
ISBN-13: 978-0-19-000000-0
Printed in Pakistan at
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. , Karachi.
Published by
Ameena Saiyid, Oxford University Press
No. 38, Sector 15, Korangi Industrial Area,
P.O. Box 8214, Karachi-74900, Pakistan.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete pdf pages in preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page in pdf preview; delete page from pdf reader
Contents
Introduction ............................................................................2 
Chapter 1 
Food and digestion ..................................................................6
Chapter 2 
Atoms and elements ..............................................................14
Chapter 3 
Heating and cooling ..............................................................21
Chapter 4 
Respiration: it’s all about energy ...........................................31
Chapter 5 
Compounds and mixtures .....................................................39
Chapter 6 
Magnets and electromagnets .................................................47
Chapter 7 
Microbes and diseases ...........................................................56
Chapter 8 
Rocks and weathering ...........................................................63
Chapter 9 
Light .....................................................................................69
Chapter 10 
Ecological relationships .........................................................80
Chapter 11 
The rock cycle .......................................................................92
Chapter 12 
Sound and hearing ................................................................99
Sample lesson plan (Unit 1) .................................................107
Sample lesson plan (Unit 9) .................................................108
Test paper 1 ........................................................................109
Test paper 2 ........................................................................115
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; delete pages pdf online
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete page pdf
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
2
Introduction
Teaching science effectively
Today we no longer question the importance of science in everyday life. Each of us knows that scientific 
discoveries have drastically altered the dimensions of our lives, our world, and our universe.
To a scientist, trained and with directed curiosity and a thirst for knowledge about the unknown, science 
means much more than the products of discovery and invention. To him, science is a body of organized and 
tested knowledge. It is also a way of thinking and working that is helpful in solving problems. Thus science 
has both content and method.
Most educators agree that the purpose of education is to change the way in which people think, feel, and 
act. In other words, education aims to modify behaviour. Every science teacher should therefore try to answer 
this question: How can I teach science so that it will become a way of living, of reacting to the environment, 
of interpreting the world in which we live? Science taught in this way is not just a collection of facts about 
our world; it creates a behavioural pattern.
When we teach to bring about such changes in the behaviour of our students, we should test our results by 
asking: Can the students think scientifically? Do they understand what science is all about and how scientists 
go about their work? Do they have a positive feeling towards science and scientists? Are they likely to read 
scientific books in later life with enjoyment and understanding? 
Learning and teaching
Learning is most likely to occur when a student has a definite purpose. Science teaching should be focused 
on the nature, methods, and aims of science. Science differs from other school subjects because it involves 
a method of discovery based on experimentation. Experiments help to answer questions by observing the 
effects of making systematic changes. New concepts must be based on an adequate background of first-
hand experiences. 
The task of the teacher is to set up a learning situation in which the student carries out activities focused 
on understanding. The learning activities must also be adapted to the individual needs of the students. In 
order to produce an active response from different students, different types of activities should be offered. 
Making observations, performing experiments, planning ways to find out something, interpreting pictures 
and diagrams, reading science content, etc. call for different types of thinking and skills. A variety of 
activities help students to grasp concepts from different directions and therefore result in a greater depth 
of understanding. 
The teaching cycle
According to psychologists, learning focused on understanding must pass through a definite cycle. The 
steps in learning may be termed:
1. Stimulus or raising questions and problems
Effective learning starts with a stimulus. To raise a question or problem, the situation must be meaningful 
to the student; that is, it must be connected with his or her personal experience. The situation must also 
be concrete and interesting enough to challenge him/her to find a solution. 
2. Assimilation or achieving experience
This step is a search for the information needed to answer the question or solve the problem. Students 
perform experiments, go on field trips, use visual aids, interview people, refer to books, etc. In short, 
students use any source of information that will provide them with the facts needed to support their 
enquiry. 
Much of the information gathered by the student is specific because it has been derived from particular 
experiences. However, these facts are useful only in identical situations. To be useful in other situations, 
specific facts must be generalized.
3. Reaction or using the generalization
Practice in the application of the new understanding must now be provided. There should be many 
situations in which the student can use the generalization to explain, predict, and plan. 
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete page in pdf file; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete pages in pdf reader; delete pages out of a pdf
3
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Organization of the book
The Science Fact file series provides a well-balanced and organized course in science, emphasizing the 
acquisition of knowledge to be used as a guide for intelligent behaviour in daily life. It is not only a collection 
of facts about the world around us. Instead the content is focused on the acquisition of general concepts. 
These general concepts are developed through several problem-solving methods. 
To help the students develop thiking skills, appropriate study materials should be organized and concepts 
developed so that they follow the patterns of effective thinking. Though the units are developed in various 
ways, they all share the same general plan or structure. The pictures and text are designed to orient and 
motivate the students. They help them understand the content of the unit and its importance. The layout has 
been designed to arouse an active, inquiring interest in the unit.
Experiments and observations are introduced whenever the student may obtain information by direct 
experience. At the end of each page there is a set of self-testing exercises. These test the student’s 
comprehension of the concepts that have been presented.
About the Teacher’s Guide
Science Fact file Teacher’s Guide 1, 2, and 3 have been written to help the teacher develop effective science 
teaching. The guide goes through each unit, giving suggestions for teaching procedures and supplying 
answers for questions and solutions for exercises and problems.
Background information
This section will prove very helpful to teachers as it contains the scientific knowledge necessary to teach a 
particular unit.
Unit introduction
Below are some of the ways in which a unit can be introduced. Most of them can also be used to start new 
problems within the unit.
1. Ask questions about the students’ experiences in relation to the unit.
This method provides an inventory of past experiences and is thus, in effect a pretest. Ask the students 
questions such as: Have you ever seen…..? What did it look like? Have you ever made a …? Have you ever 
heard about…? Have you ever watched someone …?  The purpose of these questions is to obtain some 
facts from the students’ past experiences.
Any questions that cannot be answered should be written on the board under the heading ‘Questions we 
cannot answer’.
While questioning, the teacher should bear in mind that the purpose is not to get the correct answers. 
It is to find out what the students know and how they think. Another purpose is to get the students to 
ask their own questions. As the discussion progresses, the main points of the answers may be recorded 
on the board. The students can then read the text to check their responses and also find answers to the 
questions. 
2. Using pictures
Pictures make it possible for the students to learn indirectly from other people’s experiences. Students 
should be encouraged to study the pictures on the opening pages of a unit. To provide help to develop 
the concept, several thought-provoking questions should be asked about the pictures.
3. Reading and discussion
Reading is a necessary and desirable activity for learning science, but too often it is the only activity. 
This is probably because reading is the medium most familiar to teachers, who feel more at ease when 
using it. Though science concepts are best developed through first-hand experience, sometimes, it is 
impossible to provide experiments that are simple enough for secondary level students, or they require 
laboratory facilities far beyond the resources of the average school. It is equally impossible to organize 
actual observations of all living things in their natural habitats. 
Though pictures can often substitute for direct experience, not everything can be illustrated. Therefore, 
the text must provide factual information. The text has been planned to guide the student’s thinking 
and help him organize his ideas. Thus reading is a means to an end and not an end in itself. The text 
should not be thought of as a mere body of facts to be memorized by the student and then recited to 
the teacher on demand.   
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
cut pages from pdf preview; delete page from pdf acrobat
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pages of pdf reader; delete page in pdf online
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
4
4. Experiments and observations
These can be experiments given in the book or provided by the teacher. The purpose is to explore 
phenomena that require explanation. There are various ways in which the teacher may use the experiments 
and observations depending on the time and the materials available, and the size of the class. Ideally 
each student should do his own work; but this is not possible in many schools. Satisfactory results may 
be obtained by having groups perform the experiments and make observations. However, the teacher 
should make sure that each student has an opportunity to work within a group. If an activity takes several 
days to prepare or carry out, the group should be selected in advance. 
Before any experiment or observation is performed, ask questions such as: what is the purpose of this 
experiment? What are we trying to find out? Why? This is effective as the teacher can discover from the 
answers whether the students understand what is going to be done. 
When the results have been observed and recorded, ask the students what was done in the experiment 
and what happened. Do the results answer the questions posed at the start of the experiment? How do 
they explain what happened?
The students should understand that it is highly unscientific to generalize from a single instance. 
Explain to them that it may not be possible to do many additional experiments in the science class, but 
reputable scientists insist upon performing many experiments before a general conclusion is reached and 
accepted.
Whenever possible, students should obtain facts by first-hand observation. These facts will require 
explanations. Ask students to collect and bring to class specimens of materials and living things. They 
can then examine the specimens and look for the similarities and differences between them.
5. Field trips
Another means to provide opportunities for first-hand observation is through field studies. To decide 
what to observe and what questions to ask, the teacher should first study the unit thoroughly, then take 
a walk to find out what first-hand information is available to help solve problems raised in the unit. Make 
a list of the things that can be seen and the questions that can be asked. Then take the students on the 
trip and have them make their observations. When they return to class, ask them questions that bring 
out the facts obtained and call for explanation of these facts. 
Teaching procedure
After the unit has been introduced, the students will have questions. The teacher should now develop the 
concepts that can be understood before the students can answer the questions. 
Different concepts require different methods of development. If the concept involves the characteristics of 
a group of living things, materials, etc., various members of the group are described and the characteristics 
common to all members pointed out. If a relationship concept needs to be developed, examples of the 
relationship are discussed and a generalization about this relationship is made from the examples. If the 
concept is a principle by which a device or process works, the development can be carried out in the following 
steps:
i) What does the device or process do or what it is used for?
ii) What are its parts and how are they arranged?
iii) How does the device or process work?
iv) A step-by-step explanation of what happens when it works.
In the Science Fact file series, the concepts are developed through the use of three important media: 
i) First-hand experiences such as experiments and observations because students learn most effectively 
through ‘doing’ and being actively involved
ii) Visual aids such as pictures, diagrams, graphs, and charts
iii) Text or reading material.
Any or all of these media may be used to develop an individual concept.
When the study of the unit has been completed, the students should discuss the unit as a whole in order to 
organize their ideas.
Answers
These provide, where possible, the expected results of any activity and answers to any questions present in 
the units, including the Test yourself section. They also contain answers to questions in the workbook.
5
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Problems to solve and multiple choice questions
Additional questions have been provided for reinforcement purposes. A set of multiple choice questions is 
also available at the end of each unit to check understanding of concepts. The teachers can also develop 
their own multiple choice questions.
Projects and activities
A variety of projects and activities have been included in the Teacher’s Guide to meet the needs and interests 
of different students in different localities. There are suggestions for planning and carrying out experiments 
and observations, taking field trips, collecting specimens, assembling scrap books, building models, making 
charts and drawings, and using reference books.
Lesson plan and test paper
A sample lesson plan and test paper have been provided at the end of the guide.
Finally a word about what we would like to achieve through this course. Our aim is to give students information 
about themselves and the world they live in, upon which they can base opinions, derive judgements, and 
determine courses of action in later life. We certainly do not see our suggestions as mandatory. We hope 
they will supplement and support the teacher’s own professional practice. After all, no book can replace a 
good teacher!
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
6
Food and digestion
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
1
Unit flow chart
Food and digestion
Importance of food
Types of food and food tests
Digestion
Absorption of food
Aims and learning objectives
• To extend knowledge about food and nutrition 
• To name the components of a balanced diet
• To describe the role of the main nutrients in the body
• To understand the role of enzymes in digestion
• To describe how digested food is transported around the body
Background information
The foods we eat contain different types of nutrients. The body needs these in the right quantities in order 
to stay fit. Deficiency as well as excess of nutrients can lead to problems. It is therefore important to eat a 
balanced diet.
Achieving the balance right is not always easy. Many of us just leave it to chance and eat what we like. 
However, we often eat far too much fat, sugar and salt. In addition we do not eat enough fibre. 
Fats and sugars are energy foods. Energy is measured in kilojoules (some people still refer to it as calories). 
The more kilojoules a food contains, the more energy it will provide. If we do not use up the available energy, 
the body stores the excess food as fat and one becomes overweight. Excess salt can lead to high blood 
pressure.
7
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Most people get more than enough proteins, vitamins, and minerals in their normal diet. The body cannot 
store proteins, so eating more will not make you stronger or healthier than you already are. Strength and 
fitness will only come by carefully balancing healthy eating with exercise. If you are eating enough of the 
right kinds of food then you are unlikely to be deficient in vitamins or minerals.
Fibre or roughage is made up of the cell walls of plants which pass through the digestive system without 
being digested or absorbed. It adds bulk to the food, giving the muscles in the walls of the digestive system 
something to push on. Food containing a lot of fibre helps prevent constipation and other disorders of the 
digestive tract. We should eat around 30g of fibre each day.
Food additives should be listed and their function clearly explained on food packaging.  
Unit introduction
Ask the students: why do we eat food? 
Discuss the importance of food for all living things. Explain that the energy produced from oxidized food is: 
• utilized in work and physical exercise
• incorporated into new cells and tissue growth
• used to renew and replace tissues that are constantly broken down by the chemical changes in the 
body.
Teaching procedure
Discuss the different types of food substances that we eat, and their use in the body. Have the students read 
the material on page 3 of the student’s book. 
Ask the students: what will happen if we only eat one kind of food?
Discuss the effects of overeating or being undernourished.
Explain that water makes up a large proportion of all the tissues in the body and is an essential constituent 
of the cells. It plays an important role in the digestion and transport of food material to the different parts 
of the body. All chemical reactions of the body take place in solution form.
Have the students draw a chart and fill it in:
Name of food    
Source
Use in the body
Effects of its deficiency 
carbohydrates
fats
proteins
mineral salts
vitamins
water
roughage
Take the students to the laboratory. Divide the class into groups of four. Explain the methods of performing 
food tests on samples of different kinds of food such as milk, potato, onion, egg yolk, cooking oil, butter, 
etc., to find out what nutrients are present in them.  
Show the students a chart of the human digestive system. Write the names of the parts on the board, and 
discuss the functions of each part. 
Explain the importance of enzymes in helping to perform chemical reactions in the body. They speed up 
reactions but they are not used up or changed; so how do they work? Explain that enzymes are specific. This 
means that they will catalyse one kind of reaction. Most enzymes work on one particular molecule, however, 
some digestive enzymes are able to act on a range of closely related molecules, e.g. lipase will break down 
a number of types of fat during digestion. The molecule that is broken down is called the substrate.  
The activity of enzymes is affected by changes in the pH and temperature. Each enzyme works best at a 
particular level of pH and temperature. Its activity is reduced above or below that point. Enzymes are actually 
proteins and they are affected by heat as it changes their structure. Our normal body temperature is 37°C and 
the enzymes work best at this temperature. Most enzymes cannot tolerate temperatures higher than 45°C. 
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
8
Additional activity 1
Study the graph showing the effect of temperature on enzyme activity.
Now answer the following questions.
1. What is the rate of reaction at
i)  10 degrees 
ii)  20 degrees  
iii)  30 degrees?
2. What happens to the rate of reaction every 10 degrees? 
3. At what temperature is the rate of reaction highest?
4. What happens to the rate of reaction above this temperature?
Ask the students: what happens to the food after it has been digested? 
Explain the absorption of food in the small intestine. Discuss the characteristics of the small intestine:
• It is long and presents a large absorbing surface to the digested food.
• Its internal surface is greatly increased by thousands of tiny finger-like projections called villi.
• Its inner lining is very thin and the fluids can pass fairly rapidly through it.
Additional activity 2
Ask the students to fill in the chart:
The digestive system
Part
Gland
Digestive 
juice
Enzyme
Food acted 
upon
End product
Mouth
Stomach
Liver 
Pancreas
Small intestine
Large intestine
���
���
���
���
��
��
��
��
��
��
��
���������������
������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested