99
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Sound and hearing
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
12
Unit flow chart
How sound travels
Sound as a wave
Speed of sound
How do we hear sound?
Noise pollution and sound proofing
Aims and learning objectives
•  To describe how sounds are made by a variety of musical instruments and by humans
•  To understand that sound needs a medium to travel through and that sound travels at different speeds 
through different media
•  To show how sound travels through different media
•  To describe a sound wave
•  To explain how an echo is produced
•  To introduce the concepts of frequency and amplitude
•  To explain how changes in frequency and pitch of a sound wave affect the sound
•  To describe how an oscilloscope can be used to show sound waves
•  To show how the human ear works, and describe some ways in which deafness can be caused
•  To understand the dangers of noise pollution and describe some ways in which it can be reduced
Background information
Vibrations and waves play an important part in our everyday lives. We hear sound waves wherever we go. 
Some, like music are pleasant but others are irritating and dangerous.
Unit introduction
Ask the students: how are sound waves produced? How do we hear sound? 
Explain that sound waves are caused by vibrations. Hitting a tuning fork or plucking a guitar string makes 
a musical note. The tuning fork’s prongs oscillate backwards and forwards and the guitar strings vibrate. 
Delete pages pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
cut pages out of pdf file; cut pages from pdf online
Delete pages pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages of pdf preview; delete pages of pdf
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
100
In a radio or a television the sound comes from a loudspeaker. Here the thin cone of the speaker vibrates 
backwards and forwards.
In all these cases the vibrations cause sound waves to move through the air into our ears where they are 
detected.
Teaching procedure
Perform the experiment on p 109 of the Student’s Book.
Ask the students: can sound travel through all materials? Can sound travel through vacuum?
Explain that sound can only move where there is a material. It cannot exist in a vacuum where there are no 
molecules to vibrate. 
Speed of sound 
Additional activity 1
Two students stand 400m apart in an open space. One has a starter pistol and the other has a stopwatch. 
When the gun is fired, the observer starts the watch immediately after the smoke from the gun is seen. 
The watch is then stopped immediately after the sound is heard. Do this three times and then change 
places to make sure that the wind has not been affecting the results. Calculate the average time. Use the 
following equation to calculate the speed of sound:
Speed of sound =
distance between pistol and observer
average time between smoke and sound
Ask the students: does sound travel at the same speed in all materials?
Explain that the speed of sound in air varies with temperature but is about 330 m/s at zero degrees Celsius 
(0°C). Sound travels at different speeds in different materials. In general it travels faster through liquids than 
gases and faster still through solids.
Ultrasound
Ask the students: what is ultrasound? What is it used for?
Explain that the sound we hear is a pressure wave in the air. Some pressure waves have a frequency too 
high for the human ear to detect. These are called ultrasound. They can be used at sea for finding depths 
or detecting shoals of fish. Because they can penetrate human tissue they can also be used to investigate 
inside the human body. 
Music and sound waves
Ask the students: what sound is pleasing to the ears? How is a musical sound produced?
Explain that musical instruments make sound waves at frequencies which we find pleasing. These notes are 
then put together as music.
Frequency and pitch
Ask the students: what is the number of vibrations set up in one second called? What quality tells us how 
high or low a sound is?
Explain that the pitch of a sound means how high or how low a sound is. It depends on how rapidly the sound 
producer vibrates. The frequency of a sound is the number of sound vibrations set up in one second.
Ask the students: what is the frequency of sound measured in?
Explain that frequency is measured in hertz (Hz). 
Ask the students: what is the relation between the frequency and pitch?
Explain that the higher the frequency the higher its pitch.
Ask the students: what does the loudness of sound depend on?
Explain that the loudness of sound depends on the amplitude or the size of the vibrations.
Additional activity 2
Connect a single generator to a loud speaker. 
What kind of sound does it produce? How can we change the frequency of a note? 
A single generator connected to a loud speaker gives a musical note.
By adjusting the frequency of the generator, the frequency of the note can be changed. When the frequency 
is low the notes heard have a low pitch. When the frequency is increased the notes have a higher pitch. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
cut pages out of pdf online; delete pages from pdf acrobat
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages from pdf document; add or remove pages from pdf
101
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Range of audible sound 
Ask the students: can we hear the sound of a crawling insect? A bat emitting sound at night? Why or why 
not?
Explain that a young person with normal hearing can hear notes from very low frequencies of about 10 Hz up 
to about 20,000 Hz. Older people may have a reduced hearing range. Some animals can hear higher notes.
Frequency (upper limit)  
Notes
35,000 Hz 
dogs
20,000 Hz 
human beings
10,000 Hz  
shrill whistle
1000 Hz  
soprano singer   
Wave forms
Ask the students: what happens when you throw a stone into a pond? What do you see?
Explain that circular ripples spread out from the spot where the stone enters the water. These ripples are an 
example of a circular wave motion. 
Ask a student to hold one end of a long rope tied to a nail on the wall. Now ask him/her to move it up and 
down in a direction perpendicular to its length. 
Ask the students: what kind of movement do you see? Is this movement different to the ripples in a pond?
Explain that the particles of the rope near the end exert a drag on their neighbours, so that they begin to 
oscillate i.e. move up and down as well. This process continues throughout the rope. The rope presents the 
appearance of a series of equidistant up and down movements called  ‘transverse waves’.   
Draw a transverse wave on the board. Label the crest and trough. Mark the wavelength. Ask the students 
what it represents.
Explain that a sound wave is an example of an oscillation, which is a regular backward and forward or an 
up and down movement.
Draw a few more waves on the board and discuss amplitude, pitch and frequency.  
Show the students a cathode ray oscilloscope and explain how it works. 
Musical notes can be displayed by connecting a microphone to a cathode ray oscilloscope. A pure musical 
note has a smooth wave shape. If the note is played more loudly the amplitude of the wave gets bigger but 
the number of waves per second (the frequency) stays the same.
Additional activity 3
If you blow across the open top of a glass bottle you will hear a musical note. The note can be changed 
by pouring some water into the bottle and then blowing. Investigate how the note changes as more water 
is added to the bottle.
Ask the students: how do your findings compare with the results for a stretched wire?
Vibrations in tubes
Blow into a flute and ask the students what produces the sound.
Explain that air vibrating inside a closed tube or an open tube can give a musical note. This fact is used in 
wind instruments. The air blown into the mouth piece of a flute hits a sharp wedge. This breaks up the air 
flow and makes some air vibrate inside the tube. Only some of these waves will fit the length of the tube 
properly. These waves emerge as the notes we hear. To change the notes the player covers or uncovers the 
holes in the flute. This is like changing the length of the tube.
Noise pollution
Ask the students: what kind of sound is pleasing to the ears? Which sound is irritating?
Explain that the world has become so noisy that many people think of unnecessary sound as a form of 
pollution. You have probably had headaches caused by too much noise, but the effects can be much more 
serious. A very loud sound like an explosion can cause the eardrum to split causing pain and deafness. People 
who work in noisy factories for long periods may also suffer loss of hearing if the small bones in the ear are 
damaged by constant vibration. Where noise cannot be avoided, earmuffs should be worn 
Answers 
Sound and hearing: p 108
1.  Our ears can detect sound energy
2.  Sounds are made when something vibrates.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page pdf file; delete pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
cut pages out of pdf; pdf delete page
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
102
3.  a)  The strings vibrate.
b)  The skin of the drum vibrates.
c)  The air column inside the tube vibrates.
4.  a)  Guitar and violin
b)  Clarinet and flute
c)  Drum and tambourine
5.  Humans produce speech sounds by the vibration of their vocal chords and the movement of the 
tongue.
How sound travels: p 109
1.  When the drummer hits the drum, the drum skin vibrates rapidly up and down. The vibrating drum 
skin makes air molecules vibrate backwards and forwards. These molecules affect the molecules next 
to them. The sound spreads out. Within a split second, all the air molecules will be vibrating. We hear 
the sounds when the air inside our ears stars vibrating our eardrums.  
2.  a)  We can hear sounds all around us.
b)  Dolphins communicate by sending out high pitched squeaks and clicks which travel through the 
water.
c)  We can hear someone knocking on the door and the sound of a beating drum.
3.  Sound can only move when there is a material to move through. It means that sound can pass 
anywhere there are particles, and the more tightly packed the particles are, the further the sound 
travels. That is why sound cannot travel in a vacuum because there are no particles in it. 
Sound as a wave: p 110
1.  When anything vibrates, it moves in and out very quickly, stretching and squashing the air in front 
of it. These stretches and squashes spread through the air and are called sound waves. When they 
reach our ears they make our eardrums vibrate and we hear a sound.
2.  a)  When a vibration squashes the air in front of it, the molecules are forced closer together. This is 
called a compression.
b)  When a sound wave stretches the air in front of it, the molecules spread out. This is called a 
rarefaction.
3.  The distance between two compressions is called wavelength.
4.  In a longitudinal wave the vibrations move backwards and forwards.
5.  The waves on a sea or the ripples on water move up and down, not backwards and forwards as do 
longitudinal waves.
6.  An oscillation is a regular backward and forward movement, or an upward or downward movement. 
A sound wave is also a backward and forward movement like an oscillation.
Speed of sound: p 111
1.  a)  In air, the speed of sound is about 330 metres per second.
b)  In air, the speed of sound can vary according to the temperature, so it is only an approximate 
speed.
2.  a)  Sound travels at different speeds in different materials.
b)  No. In general, it travels faster in liquids than in gases. It travels fastest of all in solids.
3.  Light travels faster than sound so we see the lightning first and hear the sound of thunder after some 
time.
A person standing 1600 m away will hear the thunder after five seconds because:
The speed of sound = distance/time
= 1600/5
= 320 m/s
4.  An echo is the reflected sound from walls and other hard surfaces. It is heard a short time after the 
original sound.
Speed  = distance/time
= 80/0.5s
= 160 m/s
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; delete pages pdf online
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
delete pdf pages online; best pdf editor delete pages
103
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
High and low, loud and quiet: p 112
1.  a)  The pitch of a sound means how high or low the sound is. It depends on how rapidly the sound 
producer vibrates.
b)  The frequency of sound is the number of vibrations set up in one second. It is measured in Hertz 
(Hz)
2.  The skin of the drum vibrates 20 times in a second.
3.  a)   When the drum is hit hard, a loud sound is produced as the skin of the drum vibrates faster and 
the amplitude, or the size of the vibrations, is larger. The greater the amplitude, the louder the 
sound. 
b)   When the drum is tapped softly it produces a low, soft sound as the skin of the drum vibrates 
slowly and the amplitude , or the size of the vibrations is smaller. 
How do we hear sound: p 113
1.  Our ears change sound energy into electrical signals which are sent to the brain.
2.  a)  The ear drum.
b)  The vibration of the liquid inside the cochlea sets up electrical signals inside the nerve cells.
c)  The hammer, anvil and stirrup inside the middle ear vibrate and pass the vibrations from the 
eardrum to the cochlea.
3.  Noisy pop concerts can be bad for the ears because they can cause tinnitus, a disease which causes 
a constant ringing in the ears.
Noise pollution and soundproofing: p 114–115
1.  a)  Too much noise causes noise pollution.
b)  Traffic, noise from radios and garden machinery.
2.  a)  Noise levels can be measured with a sound meter. A sound meter converts sound energy into 
electrical energy which can be displayed on a scale.
b)  decibels (dB)
3.  a)  30 dB
b)  20 dB
4.  The walls, floor, and ceiling reflect the smallest sound.
5.  a)  Soft foams, wadding and fabric
b)  They absorb sound energy as they are soft. They stop the transmission of sound across a 
surface.
Test yourself: p 116
1.  a)  When the drummer hits the drum, the drum skin vibrates rapidly up and down. The drum skin 
makes air molecules vibrate backwards and forwards. These molecules affect the molecules next 
to them. The sound spreads out. We hear the sound when the air inside our ears starts to vibrate 
our eardrums.
b)  By tightening the skin tensioners and by hitting the drum harder, the sound of the drum can be 
changed.
c)  i) & ii) A smaller drum will have a smaller drumskin which means lesser number of air molecules 
will bear the vibrations when the drum is hit. As a result, the sound produced by a small drum 
will not travel a long distance. Comparatively, a larger drum will have a larger drumskin area 
exposed to the air molecules. When the drum is hit, more molecules will vibrate and carry the 
sound to a longer distance.
2.  a)
amplititude
wavelength
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages from pdf online; delete pages from a pdf file
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
add and delete pages in pdf; delete blank pages in pdf online
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
104
b)
c)
d)  In 1/10 of a second it vibrates 4 times.
In 1 second it vibrates = (4 x 1) ÷ 1/10 = 40 Hz
3.  a)  An echo is a reflected sound. 
b)
c)  Using the formula: speed = distance/time
330 = distance / 0.5 s
Distance = 330 x 0.5
= 165 m
4.  a)  Sound 1 has a higher pitch than sound 2.
b)  Sound 3 has a higher frequency but a lower pitch than sound 1.
c)  Sound 2 has the highest amplitude.
d)  Sound 3 has the highest frequency.
e)  1.5 m
f)  7 Hz
5.  a)  To catch and direct the sound waves to the middle ear.
b)  They vibrate the eardrum.
c)  They transfer the sound waves to the inner ear.
d)  The stimulus of sound travels along the nerve and reaches the brain.
e)  The wax will stop the waves from reaching the eardrum.
sound pulses
transmitter sends 
out and receives 
sound pulses
electronic depth 
finder
seabed
reflected 
sound
105
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
f)  Tinnitus is a persistent ringing in the ears which can be caused by exposure to loud sounds for 
long periods.
6.  a)  The bell is suspended by rubber bands so that it does not touch the sides of the box as it will 
amplify the sound.
b)  To get accurate results.
c)  By an oscilloscope.
d)  i)  A plastic foam sheet.
ii)  Crumpled aluminium foil.
Workbook 2, chapter 12
1.  a)  Group 1 
Group 2  
Group 3
mouth organ 
harp  
tambourine
saxophone  
guitar  
drum
flute  
cello  
xylophone
trumpet  
sensory beads  
b)  i)  flute  
the air column vibrates
ii)  guitar  
the strings vibrate
iii)  drum  
the skin vibrates
c)  It plays a higher note by tightening the skin.
d)  i)  By tightening the top strings, its pitch will be reduced.
ii)  By loosening the bottom strings, the pitch will be reduced.
e)  The sound waves produced by the piano travel through the air and the vibrating molecules of air 
produce a loud and clear sound.
2.  C, E, A, D, B
3.  a) 
b)
4.  a)  To get an average result.
b)  1.2 + 1.1 + 1.3 = 3.6 
Average time = 3.6 / 3 = 1.2 seconds
c)  Speed of sound =  400 = 333.33 m/s approximately.
1.2
5.  a)  decibel
b)  Because of the vibrations caused by the working machinery.
c)  A rock concert; a rocket being launched.
d)  i)  By wearing earmuffs.
ii)  It would stop loud noise vibrations from entering the ear and hitting against the eardrum.
 They amplify the sound waves according to the hearing capacity of the deaf person.
6.  a)  C 
b)  D 
c)  B 
d)  D 
e)  i)  B 
ii)  C
high note
loud
low note
soft
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
106
7.  a)
b)  Ear canal‡ eardrum ‡ hammer, anvil, stirrup ‡ cochlea‡ nerve to the brain.
c)  i)  The eardrum can burst.
ii)  The nerve can be damaged by too much vibration.
Multiple Choice Questions
1.  Man makes sounds by vibrating the
 teeth 
 tongue 
 vocal cords 
D.  nose
2. A long vibrating string can produce a 
than a short one.
 A  higher note 
 lower note 
 soft note 
D  loud note
3.  Sound cannot travel through
 solids 
 liquids 
 air 
D  vacuum
4.  We can hear sounds of frequency ranging from
 20 to 2,000 Hz 
 20 to 20,000 Hz    C  200 to 29,000 Hz  D  26,000 to 29,000 Hz
5.  The auditory nerve
 sends messages to the brain 
 receives stimuli from the air
 sends messages to the ears 
 receives messages from the brain  
6.  Sound can pass through matter in the form of
 wind 
 waves 
 fluid 
D  electricity
7. Sounds with frequency higher than 20,000 Hz are called
 music 
 ultra sound 
 noise 
D  pitch
8.  The speed of sound in air is
 330 m/s 
 3333 m/s 
 3030 m/s 
D  3000m/s
9.  The frequency of sound is measured in
 A  ohms 
 hertz 
 Pascals 
D  joules
10. The smallest bone in the human body is found in the
 eye 
 ear 
 nose 
D  throat
Answers
1.  C 
2.  B 
3.  D 
4.  B 
5.  C
6.  B 
7.  B 
8.  A 
9.  B 
10. B
ear flap
canal
eardrum
hammer, anvil 
and stirrup
cochlea
nerve to brain
semi-circular canals
107
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Sample lesson plan: Unit 1 Food and digestion
Topic
Time
Objectives
Outcomes
Plan (Activities) Time
Resources Needed
1
Food types
1 period
40 mins.
To name the components 
of a balanced diet.
To give examples of 
food in which these 
components are found.
Background information (5 
mins.)
Introduction (10 mins.). 
Discussion on the different 
types of food. (20 mins.) 
Make a chart. 
Assessment tasks (5 mins.)
Examples of different types 
of food
Charts to show the various 
types
2
Food tests
1 period
40 mins.
To find out what food 
contains and the role of the 
main nutrients in the body.
To perform chemical tests 
in the laboratory. 
Chemical tests in the 
laboratory (10 mins. each)
Samples of food containing 
starch, protein, glucose, fat
3
Digestion
1 period
40 mins.
To know the parts of the 
digestive system and to 
know the functions of each 
part.
To describe how large 
molecules are broken 
down during digestion 
and how enzymes work.
Discussion on the nature 
and role of enzymes (10 
mins.). 
To perform simple 
experiments to find out the 
nature of enzymes  
(20 mins.). 
Assessment tasks 
(10 mins.)
Drawings on the board to 
explain how enzymes act on 
food
Samples of saliva and starch
4
Supplying every cell
1 period
40 mins.
To describe how food is 
absorbed into the blood 
stream.
To describe how blood 
transports the products 
of digestion around the 
body to understand the 
structure and function of 
villi.
Discuss the structure and 
function of villi (10 mins.). 
Discuss the absorption 
of food in relation to the 
structure of the villi  
(20 mins.). 
Assessment tasks  
(10 mins.).
A chart showing the various 
parts of the digestive system
Assessment Tasks
Homework
Teachers evaluation of the lesson
1
Why is it important to eat a balanced diet?
Attempt all the exercises at the end of each 
page.
The ‘Test yourself’ questions on pages 
10–11 will be given as a test of about 
one hour after the unit has been studied 
thoroughly. 
2
Describe how you would find out if a biscuit contains proteins, fact, 
glucose, starch.
3
Draw the digestive system and label it. What is the function of each 
part that you have labelled?
4
What are enzymes? What is the role of enzymes in the digestion of 
food?
5
How is digested food transported to all parts of the body?
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
108
Sample lesson plan: Unit 9 Light
Topic
Time
Objectives
Outcomes
Plan (Activities) Time
Resources Needed
1
Luminous and non-
luminous objects 
and the nature and 
properties of light
1 period
40 mins.
To learn how we see 
objects. 
To explain the terms 
luminous, non-luminous, 
transparent and opaque.
To understand that 
light travels in straight 
lines and at very high 
speeds.
Discuss the difference between 
luminous and non-luminous 
objects and between materials 
that light can pass through 
(10 mins.). 
To use materials to study the 
properties of light (20 mins.). 
(10 mins.) assessment.
Different types of materials: 
a candle, cardboard, opaque 
and transparent objects, a 
pin hole camera
2
Reflection of light
1 period
40 mins.
To describe how light is 
reflected by plane mirrors 
and how images are 
formed from plane and 
rough surfaces.
To understand that 
light can travel 
directly from a source 
or it can be reflected 
from a source.
Discuss reflection (10 mins.)
Perform the experiment to 
prove the laws of reflection 
(20 mins.) 
Assessment tasks (10 mins.)
A plane mirror, a wooden 
board, white paper, common 
pins.
3
Refraction of light
1 period
40 mins.
To describe how light 
is reflected by different 
materials and by lenses.
To understand that 
when light rays pass 
from one medium to 
another, they bend.
Discuss refraction of light 
through different media and 
lenses (20 mins.). Draw ray 
diagrams on the board and 
explain the formation of 
images through lenses (20 
mins.). 
Glass block, board, pins, 
white paper, convex and 
concave lenses.
4
Colours of the 
spectrum
 Mixing coloured lights 
and paints
1 period
40 mins.
To describe the spectrum 
and how the colours are 
produced. 
To describe the effect of 
coloured lights, paints and 
filters on the appearance of 
coloured objects.
To understand that 
white light is made up 
of seven colours.
To understand 
primary and 
secondary colours.
Discuss colours of light and 
formation of a rainbow  
(10 mins.). 
Discuss mixing of colours by 
practical demonstration 
(20 mins.). 
Discuss why objects look the 
colour they are (10 mins.)
Prism, torch, coloured filters, 
paints, coloured objects, 
coloured light
Assessment Tasks
Homework
Teachers evaluation of the lesson
1
What are luminous and non-luminous objects?
Attempt all the questions at the end of each 
page.
The ‘Test yourself’ questions on pages 
86-87 will given as a test (of about one 
hour) after the unit has been studied 
thoroughly.
2
How can you prove the laws of reflection?
3
Draw diagrams to show the refraction of light through a glass block, 
a convex lens.
4
Make a chart of primary and secondary colours, mixing coloured 
paints, and shining white light on to coloured surfaces.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested