19
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Workbook 2, Chapter 2 
1. a) i)  silver 
ii)  magnesium
b)  sulphur 
c)  mercury 
d)  bromine
2. a) An element is made up of the same kind of atom.
b) i)  element 
ii)  mixture  
iii)  compound
3. a)
b) It is only a theoretical way of describing an atom because an atom is so small that no one has 
seen its actual form.
c) 3 
d) 8
4. a) A
b) i)  D 
ii)  –1 
c) i)  C  
ii)  +1
5. (A)  H
2
(B)  CH
(C)  CO
2
(D)  HCl 
(E) NH
3
(F) N
2
i)  (C) 
ii)  (D)  
iii)  (A)  
iv)  (F)
6. a) Elements are arranged in order of their atomic numbers.
b) i) left 
ii) c), d)
e) hydrogen
7. Some atoms lose or gain electrons easily to become charged ions. Positive and negative ions can 
be held together by electrostatic. Positive sodium ions are attracted to negative chloride ions. They 
bond to produce sodium chloride. This is called ionic bonding. When two non-metallic elements 
react they do not form ions. Instead their atoms overlap so they can share electrons. This is called 
covalent bonding.
Problems to solve
1. Why do scientists use symbols for the elements?
2. When someone tells you that gold is an element, what do you immediately know about gold?
+
+
+
electron
neutron
nucleus
electron shell
proton
VIII
I
II
H
III
IV
V
VI VII
transition elements
noble gases
Delete page from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages in pdf reader; delete a page from a pdf reader
Delete page from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page pdf; add or remove pages from pdf
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
20
3. Write the names of the elements in each of these compounds: 
baking soda, limestone, water, vinegar, table salt
4. Mercuric oxide separates into its elements when it is heated. Is it correct to say that all compounds 
can be separated into their elements by heating them? Give a reason for your answer.
5. When salt is dissolved in water, is a compound formed? Explain your answer.
Answers to problems
1. It is easier to represent elements, chemicals, and chemical reactions using symbols. Also they are 
internationally recognized.
2. It is a pure substance.
3. baking soda: sodium, hydrogen, carbon, oxygen
limestone: calcium, carbon, oxygen
water: hydrogen, oxygen
vinegar: carbon, hydrogen, oxygen
table salt: sodium, chlorine
4. No. Only some compounds can be separated into their elements by heating. Others need different 
methods.
5. No, it forms a solution. No chemical reaction occurs and the constituents of the mixture can be 
separated by simple physical means.
Multiple Choice Questions 
1 About 
elements have been found in nature.
 90 
B 100 
C 101 
D 106  
2. An element is a chemical substance that is made up of
 only two types of atoms 
B only one type of atom
 three different types of atoms 
D only carbon atoms  
3. The nucleus of an atom is made up of 
 neutrons only 
 protons only
 protons and electrons 
 protons and neutrons
4. The number of neutrons in a hydrogen atom is
 0 
 1 
 3 
D  2 
5. Atomic number of an element is the number of 
 shells 
 neutrons 
 electrons 
 protons 
6. The atomic mass of carbon is 12. What will be the arrangement of its electrons?
 (1, 2, 3) 
 (2, 4) 
 (3, 3) 
D  (3, 2, 1)
7. The periodic table displays all the elements in order of their 
 mass numbers 
 electron shells
 atomic numbers 
 weight of the nucleus
8. Which one of the following is not a coinage metal?
 gold 
 silver 
 copper 
 iron 
9. The type of bond formed when an atom loses or gains electrons is called
 a covalent bond 
 an ionic bond  
 a multiple bond 
 a single bond
10. A water molecule is formed by the sharing of
 1 hydrogen atom and 2 oxygen atoms 
 2 hydrogen atoms and 2 oxygen atoms
 2 hydrogen atoms and 1 oxygen atom  
 1 hydrogen atom and 1 oxygen atom
Answers
1. A 
2. B 
3. D 
4. A 
5. D
6. B 
7. C 
8. D 
9. B 
10. C
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pdf pages reader; delete page pdf acrobat reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
copy pages from pdf to word; delete page in pdf online
21
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Heating and cooling
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
3
Unit flow chart
What is heat?
Methods of heat transfer
Reducing energy waste
Change of state
Aims and learning objectives
• To understand the difference between heat and temperature
• To understand temperature scales
• To use kinetic theory to explain changes in the states of matter
• To learn about mechanisms of heat transfer
• To use the particle model to explain the methods of heat transfer and change of state
Background information
Most materials can exist in all three physical states. Perhaps the best example is water. It comes out of the 
freezer as a solid (ice), out of the tap as a liquid, and out of a boiling kettle as a gas (steam). Heating or 
cooling water changes its state.
The kinetic theory of matter attempts to explain how solids, liquids, and gases behave. The theory is based 
on three assumptions: 
• all matter is made up of tiny molecules or atoms which are continually in motion
• attractive forces hold particles close together
• heating a material affects the movement of particles
A temperature scale gives us a simple way of comparing how hot objects are. The most commonly used 
temperature scale is the Celsius scale. Some common examples of temperatures on this scale are: 
Object 
Temperature in degrees Celsius
surface of the Sun  
6000
light bulb filament 
2500
Bunsen flame  
1000
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete a page from a pdf file; delete page in pdf reader
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
22
boiling water  
100
human body  
37
melting ice  
0
domestic deep freezer 
–15
Unit introduction
Ask the students: what is temperature?
According to the kinetic theory, molecules move more quickly when a substance is heated. The energy from 
the heat source is transferred to the molecules as increased kinetic energy. At the same time the temperature 
of the substance rises.
Temperature can be explained as a measure of the (average) kinetic energy of the molecules. 
Teaching procedure
Now use kinetic energy to explain what happens when a hot object is placed in contact with a cold object.
The hot object has many high-speed molecules. When these collide with the slower moving molecules in the 
cold object, they transfer some of their energy. The hot block gets slightly colder and the cold block gets 
slightly warmer. This goes on until eventually the two objects are at the same temperature i.e. a thermal 
equilibrium.
When an object cools down, its molecules slow down and have less kinetic energy. If energy is taken away 
constantly, the molecules will, in theory, stop moving. In reality, the lowest possible temperature is called 
absolute zero. No more energy can be taken away after this temperature. Scientists have calculated this to 
be about –273°C or zero Kelvin.
Show the students thermometers with different temperature scales. Ask them to study these carefully and 
discuss the temperature scales. Place the thermometers in a beaker containing crushed ice and ask them to 
read the scale on the thermometers. Now set up an experiment to study the boiling temperature of water 
and ask them to read the scale. Explain the different scales and help them to make a comparison of the 
Farenheit and Celsius scales.
For scientific work it is convenient to use a temperature scale starting at absolute zero. The Kelvin scale 
starts at absolute zero and has degrees which are the same size as degrees on the Celsius scale. This makes 
conversions easy.
Converting from one scale to another is easy: 
Kelvin temperature = Celsius temperature – 273
Kelvin scale  
Celsius scale
1273 K 
1000 degrees
373 K  
100 degrees
273 K  
0 degrees
0 K  
–273 degrees
Additional activity 1
Convert the following temperatures from degrees Celsius to the Kelvin scale.
a) 0°C 
b) 100°C c) 180°C d) –173°C e) –100°C
Convert the following temperatures from Kelvin to the Celsius scale.
a) 0K 
b)  73K 
c)  150K 
d)  473K 
e)  561K
Explain that heat moves from a place of higher temperature to a place of lower temperature. It flows by 
conduction, convection and radiation.
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete pages from a pdf document; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete pages in pdf online; delete pages on pdf file
23
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Experiment: To show that a wire gauze is a good conductor of heat.
Materials: a Bunsen burner, a tripod, a wire gauze
Method: Place a wire gauze on a tripod, over a Bunsen burner. Hold a lighted splint above 
the wire gauze and then turn on the gas.
You will see that the gas burns on top of the wire gauze and not below it. 
Why do you think this happens?
Experiment: To show that water is a bad conductor of heat.
Materials: A test tube and a holder, some ice, a wire gauze, a candle
Method: Take some ice in the test tube. Place a piece of wire gauze over the ice to stop it 
from rising. Fill the test tube with water. Heat the water in the test tube by keeping the candle 
flame close to the mouth.
What do you observe? Does the ice at the bottom of the test tube melt?
Why do you think this happens?
Conduction occurs in solid metals where the atoms are close to each other. If one end of a metal rod is 
heated, heat is transferred through the vibration of atoms to the other end. 
Whenever warm air rises, cooler air moves in to take its place. The result is a circulating current of air called 
convection current. Convection does not only happen in air. It can occur in all gases and liquids. Can the 
students think of a reason why convection cannot occur in solids? 
Ask the students: why does warm air rise?
Explain that air expands when it is heated. This makes it less dense because the same mass now takes up a 
larger volume. Being less dense, the warm air floats upwards through the denser, cooler air around it. 
Most of the heat from a heater is circulated by convection. Warm air rises above the heater. It carries heat 
all around the room.
In a refrigerator, cold air sinks below the freezer compartment. This sets up a circulation which cools all the 
food in the refrigerator.
Additional activity 2
Fill a beaker with water and gently place a few crystals of potassium permanganate in it. Hold a candle 
flame just below the crystals in the beaker. What do you observe?   
Convection is used in supplying hot water from a boiler in your homes. Water is heated in the boiler. It 
rises to the storage tank. Cooler water flows to replace it and is heated. In time, a supply of hot water 
collects in the tank from the top down. 
Explain that the waves from the Sun are mostly infrared, light and ultraviolet waves. They warm up anything 
that absorbs them. They are known as heat radiation. Some surfaces are better at absorbing heat radiation 
than others. Dull black surfaces are the best absorbers of radiation. Shiny silvery surfaces are the worst 
absorbers of radiation. They reflect nearly all the radiation that strikes them. Good absorbers of heat radiation 
are also good emitters. Dull black surfaces are the best emitters of radiation. Silvery surfaces are the worst 
emitters of radiation.
Additional activity 3
Fill two saucepans with hot water and note their temperatures. Allow them to cool. Note the temperature 
after 15 minutes. Which saucepan lost more heat? Can you explain why?
Additional activity 4
Two freshly poured cups of tea were placed on a table. Cup A was covered, while Cup B was not. Following 
is how the temperature dropped with time.
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
cut pages from pdf reader; cut pages from pdf file
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete pages from pdf in reader; cut pages from pdf
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
24
Time 
Temperature
(in minutes) 
(in degrees Celsius)
cup A  
cup B 
80 
80
2  
73 
67
4  
66  
56
6  
61  
48
8  
56  
42
10  
52  
37
Ask the students to plot a graph of temperature against time for each cup. 
What is the difference in temperature between the two cups after five minutes? How do the results explain 
conduction in hot liquids?
Discuss melting point of solids and boiling point of liquids in the light of the kinetic theory. 
Reducing energy waste
Most of the energy used by us comes from fossil fuels—coal, oil and natural gas. The supplies of these are 
limited and we are using them up at an alarming rate. 
Explain that energy conservation means making the best use of our energy supplies. It is important that we 
do not waste fuel in the home, cars, or in industries.
In the home most of the energy is used to heat rooms. When this energy escapes, it goes to heat up the 
atmosphere outside. It is spread out among many air particles and so is wasted.
The way we use fuels in our homes has changed very much over the past hundred years or so. Originally 
candles and oil lamps were used for lighting. They were dirty, dangerous and did not give much light. 
Eventually electricity took their place and now electric light bulbs and fluorescent tubes seem to be everywhere. 
Electricity has changed our lives because it can be used for lighting, heating, and to operate motors inside 
domestic appliances like mixers, juicers, hair driers, etc. Electricity is not a fuel but we produce most of our 
electricity by using fossil fuels. 
Storing heat
When a kettle is put on to boil, the temperature of the water steadily rises until it reaches 100°C. At this 
temperature it starts to boil. Once the water has begun boiling, the temperature remains constant at 100°C, 
but at the same time, heat is being steadily absorbed by the water from the gas flame. This heat, which is 
not increasing the temperature of water, is the energy needed to convert the water from the liquid state to 
the vapour state. Experiments show that 22600000 J of energy are required to convert 1 kg of water at its 
boiling point to steam at the same temperature. This is known as the specific latent heat of steam, where 
‘latent’ means hidden. This extra heat goes into the vapour, but does not indicate its presence by producing 
a rise in temperature. When steam condenses to form water, the latent heat is given out. This is one reason 
why a scald from steam does more harm than one from boiling water.
Just as latent heat is taken in when water changes to vapour at the same temperature, a similar process 
happens when ice melts to form water. However, in this case the latent heat is not so great. It requires only 
336000 J to convert 1 kg of ice at 0°C to water at the same temperature. Likewise when water freezes into 
ice at 0°C, the same quantity of heat is given out for every 1 kg of ice formed. This is called the specific 
latent heat of ice. 
Answers
Heating and cooling: p 24
1. A spark from a firecracker may be very hot but it does not contain much heat energy. Comparatively, 
a cup of hot tea would cause more damage owing to the amount of heat energy it contains. 
2. Heat is the amount of energy that something possesses. It is measured in Joules(J) or kilojoules(kJ).
3. Temperature is a measure of how hot or cold something is. It is measured with a thermometer in 
degrees Celsius.
4. The particles of a substance move with respect to the amount of energy they have. At higher 
temperatures, the particles move about very vigourously. With the decrease in temperature, this energy 
is lost slowly until the time when the particles stop moving altogether.
25
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
5. The temperature at which the particles of a substance stop moving is called absolute zero.
6. The Kelvin scale is a temperature scale starting from absolute zero.
Heat is about moving particles: p 25
1. In a liquid, the particles move faster as the temperature rises. At the surface the faster particles break 
free to form a gas above it. 
2. a) evaporation   b) melting   c)  condensation   d)  freezing
3. From the atmosphere.
Moving heat (1): conduction: p 26
1. metals
2. Substances that do not allow heat to pass through them are called insulators. For example, glass, 
plastic, and wood.
3. If one end of a metal bar is heated, the particles there gain energy and vibrate faster. This causes the 
particles next to them to vibrate faster as well. The increased vibration of particles is passed along 
the bar until the whole bar is hot.
4. Take a plastic container and make three holes near the base at one side of the container. Insert three 
metallic rods of the same length and diameter into the holes at the side of the container. Attach 
drawing pins to the ends of the rods using wax. Pour hot water into the container and observe 
what happens to the drawing pins. The drawing pins fall, one by one, according to how fast heat 
was conducted through the rods. The results show that different materials conduct heat at different 
rates.
5. a) Heat energy flows quickly through the metal base of the saucepan to reach the food item that 
needs to be cooked or warmed. 
b) Plastic is a poor conductor of heat so it will not burn our hand when we hold it.
Moving heat (2): convection: p 27
1. Liquids and gases can carry heat because their particles are free to move.
2. The heating element in the kettle only warms the water touching it. Warm water being less dense 
than cold water rises to the top. Cold water replaces the rising warm water and this in turn becomes 
warm. 
3. Warm air is less dense than cold air, so the warm air rises and is replaced by the colder denser air. 
In this way, a convection current is set up and air circulates around the room.
4. In rooms with high ceilings, it takes longer for the warm air to rise, and for the colder air to come to 
take its place.
5. The warm air rises by convection from the heater and makes the paper decorations flutter about.
6. Convection cannot happen in solids because the particles are held in a framework and they cannot 
move around as they do in liquids and gases.
Moving heat (3): radiation: p 28
1. a) White or silvery surfaces are poor absorbers because they reflect most of the radiation. That is 
why in hot sunny countries houses are often painted white to keep them cool inside.
b) Black absorbs heat more quickly than white.
c) The silvery surface of aluminium is a poor emitter of thermal radiation so the food remains 
warm.
d) A dark surface absorbs heat more quickly than a shiny one. 
Reducing energy waste: p 29
1. Energy for our homes is produced from fossil fuels, which were formed over millions of years. Since 
these energy sources are being used up at a fast pace, we should try to reduce heat loss from 
homes.
2. Air is a good insulator because it is a poor conductor of heat.
3. Insulating materials such as foam and fibre contain a lot of trapped air.
4. A layer of air is trapped between two glass panes which slows down the rate at which heat energy is 
lost. 
5. Heat loss through draughts can be stopped by filling the gaps with strips of rubber or plastic draught 
excluders.
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
26
Solar power is free: p 30
1. Most of the thermal energy that comes to the Earth from the Sun during the day is lost into space as 
radiation so the Earth cools down at night.
2. Solar heating is expensive because the cost of making the equipment is very high. 
3. a) The blackened layer at the back of solar panels absorbs the heat radiation from the Sun and 
warms the water.
b) The network of pipes helps to carry water throughout the house.
4. They are economically rich countries so they can afford to install solar heating equipments.
5. Combining solar power with the skilful use of insulating building materials could help to make an 
ideal energy-saving home. 
Some of the steps are:
• Solar panels on the roof should be positioned to absorb as much sunlight as possible.
• Large double glazed windows should be positioned on the side of the house with most sunlight 
and small windows elsewhere.
• A greenhouse or conservatory should be built on the sunny side of the house, from where the 
warm air can be circulated around the house.
• Loft insulation should stop heat loss through the roof.
• Thick cavity walls filled with cavity wall insulation would heat up during the day and radiate some 
of this heat into the house at night.
• Shutters on the windows would help the double glazing by preventing heat loss at night.
Test yourself: p 32–33 
1. Ice is a solid. When it is heated, it melts and becomes water. Water is a liquid which boils at 100°C. 
At this temperature, it turns into a gas called steam. When steam cools, it condenses and turns back 
into water. At 0°C, water freezes and turns back into ice. These are examples of changes of state.
2. a) Celsius 
Kelvin
200  
473
100  
373
273
–100 
173
–200 
73
–273  
0
b) Add 273 to the degrees on the Celsius scale to convert into the Kelvin scale.
c) i) 573 K   ii) 423 K   iii) 223 K
d) Absolute zero is the temperature at which a material has no heat energy.
3. a) i) The red blobs represent molecules.
ii) They are vibrating.
b) i) It is a solid metal.
ii) The molecules are arranged in a regular grid or lattice.
c) As a metal is heated, its molecules vibrate more quickly. Some of this energy is passed on to 
neighbouring molecules which pass it on to their neighbours and so on.
4. a) The particles are gaining kinetic energy. Some of them are also able to escape from the 
surface.
b) heat 
c) Sun
d) Drying clothes in the Sun.
5. a)   convection 
b)  radiation 
c)  conduction 
d)  convection
Workbook 2, Chapter 3
1. a) i)  B 
ii)  D 
iii) 30 degrees 
b) 15 degrees
27
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
c)
2. 
Melting
When a solid is warmed the particles move faster, until some 
break and become part of the liquid.
Evaporation
When heat is applied to a liquid, the particles move faster. At the 
surface, the faster particles break free to form a gas above it.
Condensing
When heat energy is removed from a gas, its temperature falls. 
The gas particles slow down and move closer together. Eventually 
they will come close enough to form a liquid.
Freezing
As a liquid cools, its particles slow down. Eventually they will start 
to form a framework which is typical of a solid. 
Mass is conserved
In a change of state, only the behaviour of the particles changes. 
The actual particles remain the same.
3. a) 
Article
What is it 
made of?
What is its job?
table mat
cork
prevents heat from a hot utensil to reach the 
table 
frying pan
steel
allows heat to get from burner to food
handle of fish slice
wood
stops heat to reach the hand from the heated 
utensil
base of iron
aluminium
allows heat to pass from iron to clothes
feet of kettle
plastic
prevents heat from kettle to reach the table
hot water cylinder
copper
allows heat to get from burner to water in boiler
��
��
��
��
��
��
���
���
���
���
�����������
����
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
28
b) Conductors 
Insulators
steel  
cork
copper  
wood
aluminium  
plastic
c) i) To hold hot pans or the hot oven tray.
ii) An insulator.
iii) An insulator would not allow heat to pass through it.
4. a) Cold water being denser than hot water settles to the bottom of the tank.
b) i) B 
ii) Hot water is less dense and would rise to the top of the tank. Therefore, point B would be 
best.
c) Hot air rises pulling along with it dust particles from the floor.
5. a) i) Screw top made of plastic stops heat loss by conduction.
ii) Vacuum between the inner and outer layers of the bottle stops heat loss by convection.
iii) Silvery inside surface would prevent heat loss by radiation as the heat rays are reflected 
back.
b) It prevents heat loss to the outside and stops outside heat from coming in.
c) 
6. a) An insulator is a substance that does not allow heat to pass through.
b) i) By using insulating materials such as foam or fibre.
ii) By filling cavity walls with insulating materials.
iii) By covering the floor with carpets or making wooden floors.
iv) Double glazing.
c) Double glazing and insulating materials.
d) Trapped air does not let heat to pass through, therefore, proving to be a good insulator.
7. a) i) White reflects radiations and is a poor absorber of heat. It helps to keep houses cool.
ii) Black is a better emitter of thermal radiations than a shiny surface.
iii) Hot air rises from the bonfire causing cool air to take its place. A convection current is set 
up and the person can feel a draught.
iv) Cold air being denser than hot air settles at the bottom of the refrigerator. This escapes as 
the refrigerator door is kept open.
v) By fluffing up, birds trap air between their feathers forming an insulation layer.
vi) A saucepan has a copper bottom (a conductor) to absorb heat from the fire, but it has a 
plastic handle (an insulator) so that our hands do not get burnt.
vii) Air gets trapped between the hole of the string vest and the tight shirt.
viii) Convection currents of air are produced by the warm Sun shining on the field. This helps the 
glider to gain height.
ix) Black is a good absorber of heat.
x) Convection currents of air are produced by the heater. As the warm air rises, it makes the 
paper decorations flutter.
vacuum to prevent
heat loss by radiation
or
fill the space with
an insulating material
plastic body to prevent heat loss by conduction
tight-fitting to prevent
heat loss by convection
shiny metallic inner
surface to prevent heat
loss by radiation
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested