c# itextsharp pdfreader not opened with owner password : Delete pages on pdf SDK application API .net windows wpf sharepoint TG_97801954714033-part1032

29
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
b) i) Saucepan with a plastic handle, fluffed out feathers in birds, wearing a tight shirt over a 
string vest.
ii) Glider pilots, fluttering of paper decorations, cold air from refrigerator door.
iii) Car radiators painted black, houses painted white, soil covered with black plastic sheet.
Problems to solve
1. Why do pipes sometimes burst when the water in them freezes?
2. On a very cold day your breath usually forms a white cloud. What is this cloud? Why does your breath 
not form a cloud on a warm day? 
3. When an ice cube melts, do you think it takes up more space or less space? Give your reasons using 
the molecular theory.
4. Solids usually dissolve faster in hot water than in cold water. Why?
5. The temperature of the human body is 98.6°F. What is this temperature on the Celsius scale?
6. What fuel is used to heat your home? What are the reasons for using this fuel?
Answers to problems
1. Water expands when cooled and frozen.
2. Our breath contains water vapour. When we breathe out on a cold day the water vapour condenses 
to form water droplets which form a cloud in the cold air. 
3. When an ice cube melts the molecules are vibrating at a faster rate and colliding more and more with 
each other, thereby pushing each other away thus causing the water to expand and occupy more 
space.
4. The molecules of hot water move at a faster rate as compared to those of cold water. Due to the fast 
movement of molecules, solids dissolve faster in hot water than in cold.
5. 37°Celsius 
6. Answers depend on students.
Project
Make a wall chart of temperatures.
Take a long strip of wrapping paper (about 3 metres). Mark the lower end of the scale at –273°C. With a 
difference of 10 degrees, make a mark every two centimetres up to 100°C. Mark a Fahrenheit scale alongside 
it. Put interesting temperatures at the proper points along the scale. Include the boiling points of water, 
freezing point of water, temperature of the human body, etc.
Multiple Choice Questions
1. The amount of heat is measured in
 degrees Kelvin 
 degrees Fahrenheit C  degrees Celsius 
D  joules
2. What is the temperature in degrees Celsius, at which particles stop moving altogether?
 +273 
 –273 
 –0 
D  +100
3. Which of the following have the greatest heat energy?
 solids 
 liquids 
 gases 
D  ice
4. When heat is applied to a liquid, its particles move faster and break free from the surface to form
 solid 
 liquid 
 gas 
D  water vapour
5. What happens to the particles as a liquid cools?
 They begin to move faster. 
 They start changing to vapour.
 They come closer together. 
 They move away from each other.
6. The movement of heat through a solid is called
 conduction 
 convection 
 radiation 
 insulation 
7. Convection cannot occur in a solid because
 the particles are held in a framework 
 the particles can move around easily
 the particles evaporate easily 
 the particles behave like those of a liquid
Delete pages on pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete pages pdf
Delete pages on pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
30
8. White or silvery surfaces 
 are poor absorbers of heat 
 are good absorbers of heat
 are good emitters of thermal radiation 
 absorb most of the radiation  
9. Air is a good insulator because it is a
 good conductor of heat 
 poor conductor of heat
 good radiator of heat 
 poor radiator of heat  
10. Why is there no change in temperature when solid ice turns into a liquid?
A Heat energy is raising the temperature of ice.
B Heat energy is being used to allow water molecules to break away from their fixed positions.
C Heat energy is raising the temperature of water up to boiling point.
D Heat energy is being used to allow water molecules to break free completely.
Answers
1. D 
2. B 
3. C 
4. C 
5. C
6. A 
7. A 
8. A 
9. B 
10. B
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page from pdf reader; delete page on pdf document
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page in pdf; delete pdf pages
31
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Respiration: it’s all 
about energy
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
4
Unit flow chart
Respiration in cells
Anaerobic respiration in plants and 
animals
The mechanism of breathing
Aims and learning objectives
• To show how living things release energy
• To understand that cells need a supply of food and oxygen for respiration
• To explain the difference between aerobic and anaerobic respiration 
• To describe how blood transports carbon dioxide and oxygen to and from the lungs
• To differentiate between inhaled and exhaled air
• To explain the mechanism of breathing
Background information
Respiration is a process during which living things take in oxygen from their environment and release carbon 
dioxide and water vapour into it. All living things have a different way of affecting this exchange of gases 
between their bodies and their environment. In lower forms, this exchange of gases occurs by simple diffusion 
through the entire body surface. In many animals, there are special organs which provide a respiratory surface 
for this gaseous exchange.
Unit introduction
Show the students pictures of a scuba diver, a tree, a carton of yoghurt and some fruit vinegar.
Ask the students: which of these do you think are living things? Why? 
Explain that all these have something to do with living things. The person and the tree are large organisms 
and the yoghurt and the vinegar contain micro-organisms too small to be seen with the naked eye. All living 
things need energy to stay alive. This is achieved from food where it is stored as chemical energy. This 
chemical energy is released by a process called respiration.
Teaching procedure
Ask the students: where does respiration take place in living organisms? 
Explain that respiration takes place inside the cells of plants and animals, where energy is released from food 
in a chemical reaction. Usually this reaction needs oxygen. Respiration which uses oxygen is called aerobic 
respiration.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
cut pages out of pdf online; cut pages out of pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
copy page from pdf; delete blank pages from pdf file
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
32
Carbohydrates and fats are high energy food substances. Digestion breaks these down into simpler 
molecules such as glucose. It is the energy holding these simple molecules together that is released during 
respiration.
We can summarize aerobic respiration in a chemical equation: 
glucose + oxygen ‡ carbon dioxide + water + energy
This form of respiration is very similar to the burning of a fuel. 
Ask the students: where in the cells does respiration take place?
Explain that there are rod-like structures called mitochondria in the cytoplasm of the body cells. This is where 
respiration takes place.
Ask the students: do all the body cells have the same number of mitochondria?
Explain that mitochondria are found in the cytoplasm of all cells, but the number varies according to the kind 
of job that the cells do. For example, muscle cells have lots of mitochondria because they need to release 
large amounts of energy quickly for movement.
Explain that the energy released during respiration is needed for many purposes. We need it for movement 
and to keep our body temperature steady. As a result it is very important that our bodies should be able to 
store energy, as chemical energy, ready for use.
Ask the students: can energy be stored in our bodies?
Explain that for long-term storage, the body uses fat 
molecules but these cannot be broken down quickly. 
Cells must store energy for quick release when 
necessary. They do this using a chemical compound 
called adenosine triphosphate (ATP). We can draw a 
diagram to represent ATP.
Explain that the chemical bond holding the second and 
third phosphate groups together can be thought of as 
a high energy bond. When it is broken a new molecule, 
Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is formed and energy is 
released. ATP is a short-term energy store in the cells 
which can release energy quickly when needed. 
Ask the students: what do you think happens to the 
excess energy inside the cell?
Explain that when the cell has excess energy, ADP 
molecules can be joined to phosphate groups to make 
ATP again.
Energy without oxygen
Ask the students: can we breathe without oxygen? What do you think would happen? What happens to our 
breathing rate when we are running a race? What about your heart rate? Why do you think this happens?
Additional activity 1
This activity can be done with the students in pairs. One student to perform and the other to keep a 
record.
Ask pairs of students to sit on their seats and count their breathing rate for a minute. Also ask them to 
count their heart rate for a minute. Now ask them to stand and jump up and down for five minutes and 
then sit down. Ask them to count their breathing rate and heart rate again for a minute each and record 
their results in the table below.
Sitting
After jumping for 5 min.
breathing rate/min.
heart beat/min.
After how many minutes did your heart rate and breathing rate become normal?
Why do you think this happened?
food + oxygen
ADP + P
ATP
CO
2
+ H
2
O
phosphate 1
phosphate 3
phosphate 2
adenosine
Model of an ATP molecule
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
acrobat remove pages from pdf; add remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
delete pages on pdf online; delete pages in pdf
33
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Explain that sometimes an animal’s breathing rate cannot get oxygen to the cells quickly enough. For 
example, running a race creates an oxygen shortage in the body cells. A runner breathes faster and harder 
and their heart rate also increases. 
Ask the students: can your breathing rate and heart rate continue to increase as your run?
Explain that our muscles need to release more energy for movement but oxygen cannot get to the muscles 
fast enough. So, where does the energy come from under these conditions? ATP seems like the obvious answer 
but unfortunately ATP is only a short-term energy store and it is quickly used up. The body must therefore 
‘borrow’ some energy from glucose in its cells. It does this by breaking down the glucose, without oxygen, 
into a substance called lactic acid. Lactic acid is a sort of halfway stage between glucose and its breakdown 
products, carbon dioxide and water. Energy is released and so the runner can continue running. 
Ask the students: can you keep running endlessly? What makes you stop? Why do you feel tired?
Explain that lactic acid builds up in the muscle cells causing muscle fatigue and eventually painful cramps.
Ask the students: what happens after you have run a race? What do you feel?  
Explain that after the exercise, we usually gasp for air taking in lots of oxygen; our heart will also be beating 
faster to get more oxygen to the cells. 
The lactic acid is slowly converted into carbon dioxide and water, releasing more energy which is used to 
rebuild ATP molecules. This process can be summarized as follows: 
glucose ‡ lactic acid ‡ carbon dioxide + water + 150 kJ energy
Since the process brings about the release of energy from food without oxygen it is called anaerobic 
respiration.
The respiratory system
Show the students a chart of the human respiratory system of human beings.
Explain the parts of the respiratory system. Discuss the structure of the respiratory system and explain that 
during breathing, air is taken into the lungs from where oxygen is removed and carried in the blood to body 
cells. Carbon dioxide and water, produced in the cells during respiration, leave the body by the reverse 
process. Oxygen moves into the blood system by diffusion.
The lungs are two elastic pouches lying inside the ribs. They are connected to the air outside the body by the 
windpipe or trachea. This opens into the back of the mouth and nose. The trachea divides into two smaller 
tubes called bronchi. One of these goes into each lung before dividing further into smaller tubes called 
bronchioles. After yet more branching the tubes end in tiny, thin walled air sacs called alveoli.
Lining all the air passages are two types of cells. One type is covered with tiny hair called cilia. The other 
produces a sticky liquid called mucus. Small dust particles and bacteria stick to the mucus. The cilia ‘beat’ 
to carry the mucus to the back of the mouth where it is swallowed.
Breathing
Air is a mixture of gases, one of which is oxygen. Oxygen is needed by all living things so that energy can 
be released from food during respiration. During breathing, air is taken into the lungs; oxygen is removed 
and carried in the blood to body cells. Carbon dioxide and water, produced in the cells during respiration, 
leave the body by the reverse process.
Ask the students to place their hands below the rib cage and take a deep breath. What do they feel? Now ask 
them to breathe out slowly and feel their diaphragm relaxing.
While breathing in, the muscles between the ribs contract lifting the rib cage up and out, expanding the chest. 
At the same time muscles contract to flatten the diaphragm. This makes the space inside the rib cage bigger 
and reduces the air pressure in the lungs. Air moves into the lungs from outside because the air pressure is 
higher.
The rib and diaphragm muscles relax when we breathe out. This lowers the chest and raises the diaphragm. 
The space in the rib cage gets smaller so the air pressure increases. This forces air out of the lungs. 
The table shows the amount of different gases in the air we breathe in and the air we breathe out.
Gas
Inhaled (air breathed in) 
Exhaled (air breathed out)
nitrogen
78 % 
78 %
oxygen 
21 % 
17 %
carbon dioxide
0.03 % 
4 %
water vapour
varies
saturated
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete page from pdf online; delete pages pdf document
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete pages of pdf; delete page pdf file
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
34
We can prove that the air we breathe out contains carbon dioxide by passing it through lime water. The 
presence of carbon dioxide will turn the lime water milky.
Methods of demonstrating respiration
If an organism is respiring it will:
• use up carbohydrate 
• take in oxygen
• give out carbon dioxide
• produce water or water vapour
• release energy
Experiment: To investigate decrease in dry weight (using up carbohydrates) in beans.
Materials: Cotton wool, two conical flasks, beans, test tube containing lime water
Method: Soak 40 beans in water for 24 hours. Boil half of them to kill them. Place the living 
seeds in one dish with moist cotton wool and the dead seeds in identical conditions. After 
five days take seed samples from each dish and weigh them. Heat both samples in an oven 
for two hours to evaporate all the water. Weigh them again.
Is there a difference in weight before and after the heating? Explain your results.
Experiment: To show that carbon dioxide is produced by germinating seeds.
Materials: Cotton wool, two conical flasks, beans, test tube containing lime water
Method: Place wet cotton wool in two flasks A and B. Put some soaked seeds to flask A and an 
equal number of boiled seeds to flask B. Cork both flasks tightly and leave them in the same 
conditions of light and temperature until germination is seen. Test the gases in each of the 
flasks by tilting them over test tubes containing lime water and shaking up the test tubes. 
What will be the effect of the air from flask A on the lime water?
What will be the effect of the air from flask B on the lime water?
Explain the results.
Which flask do you think is the control?
Answers 
Respiration: it’s all about energy: p 34
1. Living things need energy to carry out the different life processes in their body.
2. (a) The body gets its energy from a chemical reaction which takes place in the cells. This is called 
respiration. Carbon dioxide and water are produced as waste products.
(b) glucose + oxygen ‡ carbon dioxide + water + energy
3. We breathe in fresh air which contains oxygen required for respiration. When we breathe out we get 
rid of the carbon dioxide and water vapour.
4. Our exhaled air contains water vapour which condenses when it touches the cold window.
5. The amount of water vapour in the atmosphere varies according to the weather conditions.
Respiration in cells: p 35
1. Breathing is simply a way of exchanging gases between the lungs and the surrounding air.
Respiration is the process by which energy is released by the chemical breakdown of glucose. It takes 
place in the body cells.
2. Respiration occurs in the every living cell of the body.
3. Mitochondria are the tiny rod-shaped structures present inside the cells where respiration takes 
place.
35
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
4. There are more mitochondria in the muscle cells because they have to release large amounts of energy 
quickly for movement.
5. An ATP molecule is a complex molecule that contains three phosphates. The chemical bond holding 
the second and third phosphate together is a high energy bond. When an ATP molecule is broken, a 
new ADP molecule is formed and energy is released quickly.
6. ADP is a short-term energy store. When the body has excess energy, ADP molecules combine with 
another phosphate to make ATP again.
Energy without oxygen (1): in animals: p 36
1. The kind of respiration in which oxygen is used to release energy from food is called aerobic 
respiration. Respiration which takes place without oxygen is called anaerobic respiration.
2. glucose ‡ lactic acid ‡ carbon dioxide + water + energy (small amount)
3. a) walking  
b) running fast
4. 
Energy without oxygen (2): in plants: p 37
1. Plants produce alcohol and carbon dioxide.
2. glucose ‡ alcohol + carbon dioxide
3. fermentation
4. i)  glucose ii)  water 
iii)  warmth
5. Watering potted plants too often is harmful because the soil becomes waterlogged. The roots of plants 
living in waterlogged soil have to use anaerobic respiration. The end product of anaerobic respiration 
is alcohol. If the level of alcohol in the cells becomes too high it can kill the plants.  
6. Carbon dioxide is produced during anaerobic respiration. If the sealed container of yoghurt is left for 
a long time, its lid bulges due to the accumulation of too much carbon dioxide.
Breathing: p 38
1. Taking in oxygen and the removal of carbon dioxide from the body is called breathing.
2. Blood carries oxygen from the lungs to the cells and the carbon dioxide from the cells back to the 
lungs. 
3. From the nose and mouth.
4. The wind pipe or trachea and the bronchi.
Lungs in more detail: p 39
1. The lungs are located in the chest cavity or the thorax.
2. The lungs look like two pink sponges because they contain lots of air sacs and blood supply. 
3. One bronchus for each lung.
4. Alveoli are excellent for gas exchange because:
• There are millions of them which provide a large surface area.
• They have thin, moist walls for gas exchange.
• They are surrounded by blood capillaries.
5. a) i) A sticky liquid produced by cells which line the air passages is called mucus. 
ii) Tiny hair which line the air passages are called cilia.
b) Dust particles and bacteria stick to the mucus. The cilia, by their sweeping movements, carry the 
mucus up to the back of the mouth where it is swallowed.
food
oxygen
carbon 
dioxide
water
food
Anaerobic respiration in a cell
Aerobic respiration in a cell
energy is
released
less energy
+
lactic acid
carbon 
dioxide
water
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
36
Investigating respiration in maggots: p 40
1. A respirometer is a scientific instrument that can be used to investigate the respiration rates in small 
organisms such as maggots.
2. Soda lime absorbs carbon dioxide.
3. Both test tubes are put into a beaker of water to keep the temperature around them steady.
4. The maggots were respiring and the products of respiration made the water level rise.
5. A control is used in this experiment to make sure that the results in the first experiment are due to 
the conditions being studied and not some other cause which might have been overlooked
Test yourself: p 41
1 a) Respiration is the oxidation of food to release energy.
b) It takes place in living cells of body tissues.
c) i) glucose 
ii) oxygen 
iii) carbon dioxide and water
iv) energy 
v) aerobic respiration 
vi) Oxygen is being used.
2. a) Carbohydrates and fats.
b) Starch is acted upon by enzymes and is broken down into glucose.
c) Fat; it is stored as a layer under the skin.
d) Pasta has all the food substances in the right proportions and has a high energy value. 
3. a) A capillary is a tiny blood vessel having very thin walls.
b) oxygen
c) carbon dioxide
d) i) to dissolve the gases diffusing through its walls
ii) so that gases can easily diffuse through its walls
4. a) When yeast breaks down glucose into ethanol and carbon dioxide in the absence of oxygen to 
release energy, the process is called fermentation. 
b) i)  carbon dioxide 
ii)  alcohol
c) Yeast cells die.
Workbook 2, chapter 4
1. During respiration, glucose is broken down to release energy. If there is plenty of oxygen, the 
respiration is called aerobic respiration. In aerobic respiration, water and carbon dioxide are given 
off as waste products.
Anaerobic respiration is not as efficient but is useful in an emergency. The waste product of anaerobic 
respiration in animals is lactic acid.
2. a) The process of the break down of glucose into ethanol and carbon dioxide with the release of 
energy is called fermentation.
b) i) It will turn milky.
ii) Carbon dioxide is produced by the yeast during anaerobic respiration.
c) i) alcohol
ii) Alcohol depresses or reduces brain activity and thereby affects judgment, self control and 
the time taken to react to a stimulus.
d) It is the optimum temperature at which yeast can live.
e) i) The reaction will stop as the yeast cells will die.
ii) The reaction will gradually slow down.
37
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
3. a) 
b) i) Oxygen is taken in and carbon dioxide is given out.
ii) The blood and air.
c) i) Gases can easily diffuse through the thin walls.
ii) Gases diffuse in and out from the lining in solution form.
iii) Maximum absorption of oxygen can take place by the red blood cells of the blood vessels.
4. Breathing in  
Breathing out 
diaphragm contracts 
diaphragm relaxes
chest gets bigger 
rib muscles relax
rib muscles contract 
chest gets smaller
air is sucked into the lungs 
air is pushed out of the lungs
5. a) i)  4  
ii) 6
b) i) 3.4 cm
3
ii) 5 cm
3
c) During the race the muscles have been respiring anaerobically and a lot of lactic acid is produced 
from the glycogen which is stored in the muscles. This causes the feeling of tiredness. The lungs 
have to breathe much faster for a longer time so that most of the lactic acid is changed back into 
glycogen and stored in the muscles again.
6. a) It turns milky.
b) i) B  
ii) This shows that the air we breathe out contains a lot of carbon dioxide.
c) Carbon dioxide from the mouth will go in both the test tubes at the same time, so we will not 
get accurate results. 
7. a) It tests for the presence of carbon dioxide.
b) Air contains less carbon dioxide as compared to air that is breathed out.
c) Water is produced as a by-product of aerobic respiration.
d) Carbon dioxide, water, energy.
e) Breathing is a mechanical process by which air enters and leaves the lungs. Respiration is a 
chemical process by which the oxidation of food takes place to release energy.
f) The mouse will die as oxygen will have been used up and carbon dioxide will have collected in 
the jar. 
Problems to solve
1. Where is the food that you eat actually used in your body?
2. Why must your body have oxygen to stay alive?
3. Explain why you breathe faster after running.
4. How does your body use energy while you are sleeping?
5. After working or playing hard you feel much warmer. Explain.
trachea (windpipe)
bronchiole
alveoli
rib
bronchi
lung
diaphragm
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
38
Answers to problems
1. The food is used in the cells.
2. Oxygen helps in the oxidation of food to release energy which is used for the various activities of the 
body.
3. We breathe faster to overcome the oxygen debt which is incurred during vigorous exercise.
4. While sleeping, energy is used for growth and repair.
5. A lot of energy is produced during vigorous activity. As a result the body feels warmer.
Multiple Choice Questions
1. From which process do living things get their energy?
 photosynthesis 
 excretion 
 digestion 
D  respiration
2. What are the waste products of respiration?
 oxygen and glucose  
 carbon dioxide and water
 oxygen and water   
 glucose and oxygen  
3. What is the amount of carbon dioxide in exhaled air?
 4% 
 40% 
 0.4 % 
D  0.04 %
4. Where does respiration occur inside the cells?
 Golgi bodies 
 ribosomes 
 mitochondria 
D  chromosomes
5. In what form do cells store energy for instant release?
 ADP 
 ATP 
 TAP 
D  PAD
6. What does glucose break down into during anaerobic repiration?
 acetic acid 
 glucose 
 lactic acid 
D  protein
7. When plants respire anaerobically they produce
 lactic acid 
 acetic acid 
 alcohol 
D  glucose  
8. Which one of the following does not happen when we breathe in?
 the diaphragm flattens 
 the rib muscles contract   
 air is sucked into the trachea 
 the chest gets smaller  
9. Where does gaseous exchange take place?
 in the lungs 
 in the alveoli 
 in the bronchi 
 in the trachea  
10 What is the name of the gas that is produced during fermentation? 
 oxygen 
 nitrogen 
 hydrogen 
D  carbon dioxide 
Answers
1. D 
2. B 
3. A 
4. C 
5. B
6. C 
7. C 
8. D 
9. B 
10. D
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested