c# itextsharp pdfreader not opened with owner password : Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader application control tool html azure asp.net online TG_97801954714037-part1036

69
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Light
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
9
Unit flow chart
Reflection of light
Refraction of light
Colours of the spectrum
Mixing coloured lights and paints
Aims and learning objectives
•  To understand how we see objects
•  To understand that light travels in straight lines and at very high speeds
•  To represent light as a ray and use this concept to explain reflection and refraction at plane surfaces
•  To explain how light is refracted by different materials and by lenses
•  To describe the spectrum and explain how the different colours of the spectrum are produced
•  To learn about the origin of coloured light, and the appearance of coloured objects
•  To distinguish between the mixing of coloured lights and coloured paints
•  To describe the effect of coloured filters and coloured lights on the appearance of coloured objects
Background information
Almost anything can give out light. You can see some things because they give off their own light, such as 
the Sun. You see other things because daylight or other light bounces off them. They reflect light into your 
eyes.
Light is a form of energy. When you look at a lamp you can see an image of the lamp in your eye. Light energy 
seems to be able to travel from one place to another. How does it do this? Scientists believe that light energy 
travels from one point to another in a straight line. They believe that it does this by travelling as a wave. Light 
can travel through anything that is transparent. It travels at different speeds through different substances. 
It travels fastest through vacuum, such as through space. Its speed is then about 300,000 kilometres per 
second. Nothing can travel faster than this. 
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf reader; delete pages of pdf
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page on pdf; delete pages in pdf reader
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
70
Some facts about light
•  Light carries energy. A solar calculator does not need a battery to keep it going; it runs on sunlight.
•  Light waves can travel through empty space. We can see the Sun and stars because light can travel in a 
vacuum.
•  Light is made up of waves which are tiny electric and magnetic vibrations just like ripples spreading across 
the surface of water. 
•  Light travels in straight lines.
Unit introduction
Ask the students: what is light? How do we see things? Do all objects give out light?
Explain that visible light is a small part of an electromagnetic spectrum that can be detected by our eyes. We 
can see things because they scatter (reflect) this light into our eyes. 
Explain that a luminous object is one which gives out its own light. The Sun and a burning candle are luminous 
objects. Non-luminous objects do not give out light. We can see non-luminous objects because they reflect 
light into our eyes.
Show the students different types of transparent, translucent and opaque objects. Ask them to classify them. 
Explain that non-luminous materials can be classified into three types depending on their ability to allow light 
rays to pass through them: transparent materials allow light rays to pass through; translucent materials allow 
only some light to pass through, while opaque materials do not allow any light to pass through.
Teaching procedure
Shadows 
Ask the students: what is a shadow? How is a shadow formed?
Explain that a shadow is formed by placing an opaque object in the path of light. 
Additional activity 1
Set up a lamp, a battery and a ‘screen’. Hold the lamp vertically and observe the shadow of the lamp on 
the screen. 
Now turn the lamp so that its filament is horizontal. Is the shape of the shadow the same? What property 
of light does the shape of the shadows explain?
Ask the students: what is the colour of light? Write VIBGYOR on the board and explain that white light is 
made up of seven colours.
Ask the students: how can we see the seven colours of white light? Have you seen a rainbow? 
Explain that the visible spectrum can be seen by passing white light through a glass prism. This is called 
dispersion of light. Also explain that a rainbow is formed when sunlight passes through tiny droplets of 
water in the air after a rain shower. The droplets of water act like tiny prisms through which dispersion of 
light takes place.
Experiment: To show that light travels in straight lines
Materials: three cardboard pieces, candle
Method: Set up three cardboards, each with a hole in the centre, so that the holes are in a 
straight line. Place a burning candle behind the cardboard that is furthest away. Observe the 
candle flame through the first cardboard. What do you see?
Now push the middle cardboard slightly away from its position and observe the flame again. 
Can you see the flame? Explain your answer.
Reflection
Ask the students: what can you see when you look into a flat mirror? How is the image formed?
Explain that when you look into a flat (or plane) mirror, you can see an image of yourself. Your image appears 
to be of the same size as you are. It appears to be behind the mirror. 
If you shine rays of light at a mirror, they are reflected in definite directions. If you measure the angle of the 
incoming (incident) light, and the angle of the reflected light, they are always equal to each other. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
delete page in pdf file; delete pages from a pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
71
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Ask the students: how do we see objects which are not sources of light (non-luminous objects)?
Explain that compared to a plane mirror, the surface of a piece of paper is rough. Each bit of the surface is 
at a different angle to the next. Each incoming ray of light obeys the reflection rule, but the rays hit pieces 
of the surface which are at various angles. The result is that the light is reflected from the paper not in a 
single beam but in many different directions. It is scattered. Wherever your eye is, it can see some of this 
scattered, reflected light. 
Refraction
Look at the front of a fish tank. Where do the fish and the back of the tank appear to be?
Explain that they appear to be closer than they actually are. A similar effect will be noticed if you go to a 
swimming pool. The water appears shallower than it really is.
Additional activity 2
Stand a glass block on a piece of paper with a small ink spot on it. Look down through the block at the 
ink spot. Where does the spot appear to be?
Explain that light bends as it passes from one transparent material to another. This is called refraction. 
A ray of light is always refracted in a definite direction. As light passes from a dense material to a less 
dense material (e.g. from glass to air) it bends away from the normal. As light goes into a more dense 
material it bends towards the normal.
Lenses
Ask the students: have you ever looked through a magnifying glass, or the glasses of a pair of spectacles? 
What size does the object appear to be?
Explain that lenses are pieces of glass that have a focusing effect. Convex lenses bend light towards a central 
axis, so they are called converging lenses. Concave lenses bend the light away from the axis, so they are 
called diverging lenses. 
Additional activity 3
Show the students different kinds of lenses and ask them to observe objects of different sizes as well as 
near and far objects and record their observations.
Explain that if you look through a concave lens, you can see a lot of your surroundings, but the image 
appears smaller than normal.
In a convex lens, if you look at something close up you see a magnified image. A distant object though, 
will appear upside down.
Additional activity 4: To make a simple refracting telescope
You will need a large diameter, but fairly thin, convex lens at the end of the telescope. This is called the 
objective lens which will be nearest to the object you are looking at. You will also need a small diameter, 
thick convex lens for the eyepiece. Fix the lenses on a metre-rule with gum or plasticine.
Now observe a distant object, such as a tree, through the eyepiece. What do you see?
Explain that the objective lens produces an upside down image of the object you are looking at. The eyepiece 
acts as a magnifying lens to inspect this image. 
Parallel rays of light passing through a converging lens are brought together at a focal point. Parallel rays 
passing through a diverging lens are bent as if they came from a single focal point. The distance between 
the centre of a lens and its focal point is called the focal length. Powerful lenses have short focal lengths; 
weak lenses have long focal lengths.
Experiment: Finding the approximate focal length of a convex lens.
Materials: a convex lens, a concave lens, a screen or a wall to see the image
Method: Focus light from a window on to the wall or screen on the other side of the room. 
When the image is sharply focused, measure the distance between the screen and the centre 
of the lens. This distance gives an approximate focal length of the lens. 
What do you notice about the size and position of the image? Is the image upright?
Repeat the above experiment with the concave lens. 
Do you get the same result? Why?
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete pages in pdf online; delete page on pdf file
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
delete page on pdf reader; acrobat remove pages from pdf
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
72
Images formed by lenses
Rules for drawing ray diagrams
•  Any ray passing through the optical centre of the lens passes straight through without being bent.
•  Any ray parallel to the axis of the lens passes through the focal point after it leaves the lens.
•  Any ray through the focal point of the lens leaves parallel to the axis of the lens.
•  The image formed by a convex lens is real, inverted and smaller than the object.
•  The image formed by a concave lens is always virtual, upright and smaller than the object. 
Uses of lenses
One of the oldest and certainly most common uses of lenses is to improve the vision of people with poor 
eyesight. Short-sighted people can see things clearly which are close but they cannot focus on things which 
are far away. Short-sighted people need concave lenses to see clearly.
Long-sighted people can see distant things but cannot focus things close to them. Long-sighted people need 
convex lenses to see clearly.
Lenses are also used in cameras, telescopes, binoculars, and projectors.
Coloured light
White light can be split up into a range of colours called the visible spectrum. Our eyes contain only three 
types of colour sensors. One type responds to red light, another to green and the third to blue light. Red, 
blue and green are called the primary colours. If our eyes receive red, blue and green lights together, we see 
white light. By varying the amounts of each primary colour present we can see any colour of the spectrum.
Looking at coloured objects
White light from the Sun or from a light bulb contains all the colours of the spectrum. Why do many objects 
look coloured? The answer is that the materials they are made of absorb some of the colours and reflect the 
rest. As a result we only see the colours of the reflected light. 
Primary colours 
Colours seen by eye
red + green + blue  
white
red + green  
yellow
red + blue  
magenta
green + blue  
cyan (peacock blue)
Pigments
We call chemicals which reflect only certain colours pigments. Paints, inks, and coloured crayons contain 
pigments. Some mixtures of pigments will absorb all the colours of the spectrum. These appear black.
Mixing pigments
There are three primary pigment colours: red, blue and yellow. With them a wide range of other colours can 
be made. This is because the pigments do not reflect just one colour but a small part of the spectrum. For 
example, blue paint absorbs red, orange and yellow light, but reflects blue, green and violet lights.
��
��
��
��
Ray diagram viewed through a convex lens
Ray diagram viewed through a concave lens
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete page from pdf preview; pdf delete page
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete a page from a pdf in preview; delete pages from pdf preview
73
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Filters
A filter is a coloured piece of glass or plastic which lets through some colours but filters out all the others. 
For example, a red filter lets red light through but absorbs green and blue light. Looking at objects through 
coloured filters or shining coloured lights may make them look different colours.
A green apple looks green because it reflects green light. If we look at it in red light it looks black because 
there is no green light to reflect.
Answers 
Light: p 78
1.  Luminous objects give out their own light. Non-luminous objects do not emit light. We see them when 
they reflect light from a luminous source into our eyes.
2.  Light travels at a speed of almost 300,000 kilometres per second in air.
3.  Because light travels in straight lines, we can represent them using a ruler.
4.  Rays of light can pass through transparent materials such as glass and acetate sheet. Translucent 
materials allow only some light to pass through. These include grease-proof paper and frosted 
glass.
5.  a)  Transparent materials: acetate, paper and glass
b)  Translucent materials: frosted glass and greaseproof paper
c)  Opaque materials: wood and metal
6.  In air, the speed of sound is about 330 m/s.
Reflection of light: p 79
1.  A plane mirror is a flat mirror.
2.  A piece of paper is a material that does not reflect light.
3.  The incident ray is the incoming ray which strikes the mirror at an angle. The reflected ray is the 
outgoing ray which is reflected at the same angle as the incident ray.
4.  A line drawn between the incident ray and the reflected ray at 90 degrees to the mirror is called the 
normal.
5.  The rule of reflection is: the angle of incidence is equal to the angle of reflection.
6.  a)  When light rays from an object strike a plane mirror, the image appears to be the same distance 
behind the mirror as the object is in front. This is a virtual image because no rays of light actually 
pass through it.
b)  The image of an object in a plane mirror seems to be laterally inverted, which means it appears 
changed from left to right.
Refraction of light: p 80
1.  a)  When a ray of light passes from air into a material such as glass or water, it slows down and 
bends towards the normal. This bending of light is called refraction.
b)  Light entering the glass block slows down and bends towards the normal. As it leaves the glass, 
it speeds up again and bends away from the normal. The ray emerging from the rectangular block 
is parallel to the ray going in.
2.  Since a diamond is denser than water, the light slows down more and so the refraction is greater.
3.
���
���
air
perspex
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete page numbers in pdf; delete page in pdf preview
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe reader.
delete pdf pages reader; delete blank pages in pdf
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
74
4.  Water never looks as deep as it really is. If you throw a stone in a tub of water, you will see that it 
appears to be in a different place from where it actually is. This is because light rays from the pebble 
bend away from the normal when they leave the water. From above, the rays seem to come from a 
point which is not so deep, and is slightly to one side. So, the pebble seems closer than it actually 
is.
Refraction in lenses: p 81
1.  a)  A concave lens is thinner in the middle than at the edges.
b)  A convex lens is thicker in the middle than at the edges.
2.  A convex lens.
3.  a)  The point at which all the rays passing through a lens seem to meet is called the focal point of 
a lens.
b)  The distance between the focal point and the middle of the lens is called the focal length. 
4.  A convex lens focuses the light rays to a point, whereas a concave lens spreads the light rays. To find 
the focal length of a concave lens the refracted rays have to be traced back through the lens. 
Colours of the spectrum: p 82
1.  When a ray of white light is passed through a triangular prism it is split into different colours. The 
continuous spread of colour is called a spectrum.
2.  a)  Blue light is refracted more than red light.
b)  Red light has a longer wavelength than blue light so it is refracted at a greater angle than blue 
light which has a smaller wavelength and is refracted at a smaller angle.
3.  a)  Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet.
b)  VIBGYOR
4.  The different colours of the spectrum are produced because different wavelengths of light are refracted 
at slightly different angles. This is called dispersion. Different wavelengths are seen as different 
colours.
5.  a)  A rainbow is an example of a spectrum that occurs naturally. It is caused when sunlight from 
behind you is refracted through raindrops in front of you. Rain drops act like tiny prisms splitting 
sunlight into different colours of the spectrum.
b)  In front of me.
Mixing coloured light: p 83
1.  The primary colours of light are red, blue and green.
2.  a)  The secondary colours of light are cyan, yellow and magenta.
b)  Combining any two of the primary colours produces the three secondary colours.
3.  If you shine a ray of light through a coloured filter, some colours are blocked, or absorbed. Other 
colours are allowed to pass through or transmitted.
4.  a)  A blue filter will absorb the colours red and green light.
b)  It will transmit blue light.
5. 
Mixing coloured paints: p 84
1.  a)  Chemicals which cause colours are called pigments.
b)  Paints, inks, coloured crayons, petals of flowers, leaves of plants, and skins of animals.
2.  The primary pigment colours are red, blue, and yellow.
3.  a)  The secondary pigment colours are magenta, green, and orange.
b)  Red mixed with blue gives magenta; blue mixed with yellow gives green; yellow mixed with red 
gives orange.
���
����
�����
����������
�������������
������������
75
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
4.  a)  A red surface absorbs blue and green, and reflects red light.
b)  A green surface absorbs red and blue light, and reflects green light.
c)  A blue surface absorbs red and green, and reflects blue light.
5.  a)  White surfaces reflect all the colours of the spectrum.
b)  Surfaces that absorb all the colours of the spectrum appear black.
Coloured surfaces in coloured lights: p 85
1.  Blue and green. 
2.  Magenta and yellow.
3.  a)  Green and blue.
b)  The shirt looks green; the trousers look blue.
4.  They will not be able to make their food as only the red and blue parts of the spectrum are used in 
photosynthesis.
Test yourself: p 86–87
1.  a)  Translucent is used to describe materials that allow some but not all light to pass through. For 
example, grease proof paper and frosted glass.
b)  Since light travels in straight lines, rays of light coming from the top of the object will travel in 
a straight line through the pinhole and form an image at the lower end of the screen. The rays 
coming from the lower end of the object will travel in a straight line through the pinhole and will 
form an image at the top of the screen. Thus an inverted image of the object will be seen on the 
screen.
c)  i)  It would appear bigger.  
ii)  It would appear smaller.
d)  It is blurred.
2.  a), b) & c)
d)  Laterally inverted means that a mirror turns the image around from left to right and vice versa. 
For example when you raise your right hand in front of the mirror you will find that the left hand 
of your image is raised.
e)  If you look behind a mirror, you will not be able to see the image. If you place a screen behind 
the mirror, you will not be able to catch the image on the screen. This type of image is called a 
virtual image.
3. 
candle
eye
image
plane mirror
air
air
water
glass
60
o
60
o
45
o
40
o
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
76
4.  a)  i)  Convex lens 
ii)  Concave lens
b) 
c)  The point upon which light rays passing through a convex lens are focused, is known as a focal 
point.
d)  spectacles
5.  a)  Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet.
b)  Violet light refracts at a larger angle than red because it has a smaller wavelength.
c)  i)  By placing another prism in the following position, we can spread the colours of the 
spectrum.
ii)  When we place another prism in an upside-down position in front of the first prism, we can 
bring the colours together. 
Workbook 2, chapter 9 
1.  a)  Light from the window reflects light from the pages into her eyes.
b)  The pages of the book are opaque.
c)  opaque
2.
incident ray
reflected ray
angle of incidence
angle of reflection
mirror
ray of white light
red
violet
prism 1
prism 2
spectrum
white
screen
violet
red
red
violet
ray of white light
prism 1
prism 2
violet
red
ray of white light
77
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
3.  a) 
b)  The angle that they form with the normal.
4.  a)  See the answer for Test yourself question 4(b).
b)  i)  magnified 
ii)  diminished
c)  As a corrective lens for short-sightedness.
d)  i)  The image is smaller than the object.
ii)  The image is inverted or upside down.
5.  a)  Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet.
b)  i) red  
ii) violet
6.  a)  A colour filter absorbs some colours and transmits others.
b) 
c)
7.  a)  The car appears orange.
b)  i)
incoming ray
emerging ray
angle of incidence
angle of refraction
refracted ray
���
����
�����
�����������
������������������
�������������
blue light
green light
red light
blue filter
green filter
{
white light
magenta light (blue+red)
blue car
blue
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
78
ii)
iii)
Projects
1.  Make a chart about coloured light.
Primary colours: 
red, blue, green
Secondary colours:  
cyan, yellow, magenta
Rules for addition of light:
Primary colours  
Colours seen by the eye
red + green + blue  
white
red + green    
yellow
red + blue  
magenta
green + blue    
cyan (peacock blue)
Primary pigment colours: red, blue, yellow
Secondary pigment colours: magenta, green, orange
Mixing pigments/paints
Colour 
Absorbs  
Reflects
blue  
red, orange, yellow 
blue, green, violet
yellow  
blue, violet  
red, green
red  
blue and green 
red and yellow
Filters
Colour  
Absorbs  
Transmits
red  
blue and green light  
red light
green  
red and blue light 
green light
blue  
red and green light  
blue light
2.  Producing the spectrum on paper.
You will need a straight-sided tumbler, a piece of card with a 1 cm slit, a sheet of white paper, and 
adhesive tape.
Fill a glass with water and tape the card on at the slit. Place the white paper close to a window, and put 
the glass on it. Sunlight passing through the slit is refracted by the water in the glass. This produces 
a spectrum on the paper.
3.  Making a colour viewing box.
You will need a shoe box with a large, rectangular hole cut in the lid and a small hole in one end, 
red and green cellophane, scissors, flashlight, green apple, banana, and playing cards (hearts or 
diamonds).
cyan light (blue+green)
red car
no light reflected
yellow light (red+green)
green car
green
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested