c# itextsharp pdfreader not opened with owner password : Acrobat extract pages from pdf control application system web page azure windows console TG_97801954714038-part1037

79
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Seeing green 
Tape the green cellophane under the lid of the box. Place the fruit and card inside and position the 
flashlight.
In a darkened room, shine the flashlight into the box. The green apple looks greener, the banana has a green 
tinge, and the red hearts look black. This is because the filter allows only green light through. It cuts out the 
red light reflected from the hearts.
Seeing red
Replace green cellophane with red, and shine the flashlight into the box. Now the banana has a red tinge and 
the green apple appears dark, and the whole playing card appears red, so the hearts disappear.
Multiple Choice Questions
1. Objects that give out their own light are called
 transparent 
 opaque 
 luminous 
D  non-luminous
2. Which one of the following is a non-luminous body?
 the Sun 
 the moon 
 the stars 
D  a TV screen 
3. The angle at which a ray of light strikes a mirror is called
 reflected ray 
 incident ray 
 refracted ray 
D  normal  
4. Which one of the following is not a property of an image formed in a plane mirror?
A The image is as far behind the mirror as the object is in front of it. 
B The image is upside down.
C The image is laterally inverted.
D The image is virtual. 
5. What is the speed of light in air?
 300 km/s 
 3000km/s 
 30000 km/s 
D  300000 km/s
6. What is the change in direction of light called when it enters a material at an angle?
 reflection 
 refraction 
 diffraction 
D  diffusion
7. Which one of the following is not a property of an image formed by a concave lens?
 The image appears smaller. 
 The image is always upright.
 The image is magnified. 
 The image is virtual.
8. When a ray of white light is passed through a prism it splits into a continuous spread of colour 
called 
 a bean 
 a spectrum 
 a rainbow 
D  a lens
9. The primary colours are
 cyan, yellow magenta 
 cyan, red, blue
 red, blue, green 
 red, blue, yellow
10. What colour can be seen when white light shines onto a red surface?
 red 
 green 
 blue 
D  yellow
Answers
1. C 
2. B 
3. B 
4. B 
5. D
6. B 
7. C 
8. B 
9. C 
10. A
Acrobat extract pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf; delete page in pdf online
Acrobat extract pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf reader; delete pdf pages in reader
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
80
Ecological 
relationships
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
10
Unit flow chart
Types of communities
Counting populations
Food relationships
Biomass and energy flow through 
ecosystems
Aims and learning objectives
• To build on previous knowledge about this topic and look more closely at habitats and populations
• To learn sampling techniques for collecting data about populations
• To draw and explain the difference between pyramids of numbers and biomass
• To introduce the concept of energy flow through ecosystems
Background information
If left on their own with plenty of food and space, the number of individuals in a group of plants or animals 
will get bigger and bigger. Eventually, however, a point will be reached when the group will not get any larger. 
The environment will no longer support extra individuals. There will be competition for food and shelter, 
many individuals will be eaten by other animals, and some will die of diseases. The number of individuals in 
natural groups of plants and animals are therefore kept under control—there is a natural limit. 
By now you should understand that the transfer of food along a food chain is very inefficient. In most food 
chains there is usually a high loss of energy between each link:
Approximately only 10 % of the energy entering one level passes to the next.
This energy loss could be cut down if people were to eat food from further down the food chain. Eating plants 
instead of the animals that feed on them makes a better use of the available energy. This is why cereals are 
grown in such large quantities all over the world.
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
delete pdf pages acrobat; copy pages from pdf to word
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
cut pages out of pdf; add and delete pages in pdf online
81
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Unit introduction
Start the lesson by explaining that in an ecosystem there are always more organisms produced than can ever 
survive.
Ask the students: which organisms will be able to survive in a population?
Explain that only those best adapted to their environment will survive. This was one of Charles Darwin’s 
important observations which helped him to develop his theory of evolution. Competition takes place between 
organisms of the same species and between organisms of different species.
Ask the students: what do plants compete for?
Experiment: To find out what factors do plants compete for
Materials: You will need four paper cups for each group, potting soil, bean seeds, a marking 
pen, water, and a sunny window sill.
Method: Divide the class into groups of eight. 
Fill four cups with potting soil. Plant about fifteen seeds in the first cup about ten seeds in 
the second cup, five seeds in the third cup, and two seeds in the fourth cup. Place all the 
cups near a sunny window sill, and water each cup with the same amount of water every day. 
Label the cups.
Keep a record of how many seeds sprout up in each cup daily. 
Discuss the end results after two weeks. 
Describe the appearance of the plants in the four different cups. 
Did all the bean seeds sprout? Why not?
What effect did over population have on the bean plants?
Which plants grew best in the overpopulated cups? 
Explain that all living things compete for air, water, sunlight, living space, etc. The strongest or hardiest are 
the ones that are most fit for survival.
Those organisms which are best suited for the environment live and survive.
Ask the students: why are plants vital for an ecosystem?
Explain that plants make energy available to other organisms by ‘trapping’ it from sunlight. Plants therefore 
try to ‘trap’ as much light as they can to make as much food as possible. This competition for light can be 
seen in a wood. The faster growing trees usually win the race.
Ask the students: what other substances are important for plant survival?
Explain that water and mineral salts are essential for plant survival. Food cannot be made without them. Plants 
with root systems that spread deeper and wider in the soil will be more likely to survive at the expense of 
those with smaller roots.
Ask the students: what other factors are necessary for plant survival? 
Explain that bright, sweet-smelling flowers attract insects. The more insects that visit a flower, the more  
chances the plant has of pollinating other flowers and therefore reproducing itself.
Teaching procedure 
Ask the students: what do animals compete for?
Explain that food and water are vital to animals for survival. The more food and water an animal can get, the 
better its chances for survival. Animals, unlike plants, can move from one place to another, so animals can 
hide from predators or shelter from bad weather.                
We have seen how animals feed on other living animals. Many animals avoid being eaten. They live on and 
reproduce in order to keep their species going. 
Ask the students: all animals die sometime, so what happens to their dead bodies?
Explain that in every ecosystem there are consumers that feed only on the dead remains of others. These 
animals prevent the environment from getting cluttered up with dead bodies and waste. They also ensure that 
materials are recycled in ecosystems. There are two types of consumers: scavengers and decomposers.
Ask the students: who clears the forests of dead leaves and animals? What is a scavenger?
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete a page from a pdf online; delete blank pages in pdf files
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
cut pages from pdf reader; delete pages from a pdf reader
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
82
Explain that a scavenger is an animal that feeds on dead animal and plant remains. Snails in a pond eat dead 
fish. Crows feed on dead insects, birds, rabbits, and anything that might be killed on the road by passing 
cars and trucks.
Ask the students: what is the difference between a decomposer and a scavenger?
Explain that decomposers do not eat dead animals and plants. They digest them by releasing enzymes on to 
the remains to break them down into simpler substances. Some of this digested material is then absorbed 
into the decomposers’ own cells.
Ask the students: can you think of some organism that is a decomposer?
Explain that fungi and bacteria are decomposers. These organisms are important in the cycling of materials 
in the soil environment. Producers then take up the materials which decomposers have made, use them for 
growth, and so make them available for living animals in food chains.
Additional activity 1
Draw a food cycle involving a producer, a primary consumer, a secondary consumer, a tertiary consumer, 
a scavenger, and a decomposer.
Communities and populations
Ask the students: where do living things live? 
All living things live in places that are best suited to their needs. The place where an animal or plant lives is 
called a habitat. Sometimes a word microhabitat is used to describe a small part of a habitat. A rotting log 
in a woodland habitat provides a microhabitat for many plants and animals. Microhabitats usually provide 
different conditions from the main habitat. If an organism is to live successfully, its habitat must contain 
food, shelter, and a place to breed.
Counting populations
Ask the students: does the number of individuals in a community always remains the same? How can we 
count the population of a certain breeding group?
Explain that the number of individuals in a breeding group never stays the same. It changes over a period of 
time. It is not always easy to see how the number of individuals in a group changes. Sometimes it is necessary 
to carry out surveys to find out exactly what is happening. 
Counting populations in a sample
Ask the students: how can we count the number of plant species growing in an area?
Explain how quadrats can be used to see how often particular plant species occur across a habitat. This is 
called species frequency. When the quadrat is lying on the ground you simply add up the number of squares 
that contain plants of the same species. It does not matter how many plants there are in each square. The 
final number is then calculated as a percentage of the total number of squares in the quadrat.
You can also use a quadrat to measure how much ground is covered by a plant species. This is called a 
species cover. You can also estimate how many squares could be filled up if you were able to move the 
plants together.
Counting animals
Ask the students: can we use the quadrat method for counting animal species in an area? Why? 
Explain that animals, unlike plants are not always easy to see. However, you can use a number of methods 
to count animal populations.
Discuss the methods of collection and capture-recapture of counting populations. 
There are some things that you need to be aware of when using the capture-recapture method:
• The habitat should have fixed boundaries.
• You must leave sufficient time before recapturing the animals; but do not wait too long otherwise your 
marked animals might die.
• Marking methods must not affect the life of the animal. For example, it is no use marking snails in a way 
that makes them easily seen by birds.
• It is very important to write down the results of your population counts as soon as you make them.
• Your notebook needs to be carefully organized so that no information is left out.
Population growth
Ask the students: how does the population of a species increase?
Explain that a population will grow if more plants or animals are born than die. However, populations do not 
grow at the same rate all the time. The size of the population at any one time affects its growth rate. 
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pages from a pdf online; cut pages out of pdf file
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete pages from a pdf document
83
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Additional activity 2
A single yeast cell is put into a flask containing a glucose solution. The flask is put in a warm place. 
Conditions are ideal for the yeast to start reproducing and increasing the population. By counting the 
number of yeast cells at regular intervals we can gather enough information to plot a graph. The graph 
is called a growth curve. 
Ask the students: will the yeast cells keep multiplying forever?
Explain that growth cannot continue forever at the same rapid rate. Sooner or later there will be a shortage 
of necessities like food or space. When this happens, the population growth slows down and becomes stable. 
The birth and death rate balance each other. This is called the stationary phase.
A large population may eventually begin to have an effect on its environment. For example, the population 
may begin to produce more waste than the environment can take. This will cause more individuals to die 
than be born. The growth curve now enters its death phase. The population begins to fall.
Additional activity 3
Bacteria reproduce by one cell dividing into two new cells, this division happens once every 20 minutes. 
Starting with one bacterium living in ideal conditions:
a) Draw a chart showing the population increase over a 5-hour period.
b) Use this information to draw a growth curve; plot time on the horizontal axis.
Environmental pressures
Ask the students: can you think of some factors which affect the growth of populations?
Explain that anything which prevents growth in a population is called environmental pressure. It can be 
divided into two main groups:
Population-dependent pressures
• A shortage of food, water or oxygen affects all organisms.
• Low levels of light affects growth of plants.
• Lack of space leads to overcrowding.
• Diseases spread due to overcrowding.
• Predators find it easy to catch prey if they are available in large numbers.
Ask the students: are there other factors which can affect the number of organisms in a population?
Explain that some natural catastrophes as well as other factors can affect the population number.
���������������������
���������
����������
����������
�����
�����
�����
A typical growth curve for a population
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete page from pdf file; delete pages from pdf document
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete page from pdf document; add and delete pages from pdf
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
84
Population-independent pressures:
• A sudden change in temperature may kill a large number of organisms.
• Forest fires destroy a large number of plants and animals.
• Severe storms and floods wash away the homes of burrowing animals.
• Plants covered with water for long periods also die.
Interactions between populations
Ask the students: what are some things for which there is competition between species within a 
community?
Explain that a habitat is rarely occupied by a single species of plant or animal. Communities contain many 
species, all of which interact with each other. There is competition for things like food, space, and shelter 
both within a species and between species.
One obvious relationship between two species is that of predator and its prey. Predator-prey relationships play 
an important part in controlling populations. When a predator eats its prey, it removes particular individuals 
from the population. These individuals are usually the sick or the old. Neither is of any use to the species as 
a whole. Sick animals spread disease to others and the old use up valuable food supplies. 
Ask the students: what happens when the young and healthy are eaten?
Explain that the prey population begins to fall. If it falls too far, the population of predators falls with it. 
Fewer predators mean that less prey will be eaten. This allows the prey population to increase again.
The number of predators is always lower than the number of prey in a habitat and the predator cycle closely 
follows that of the prey. As the number of prey increases so does the number of the predators.
Answers 
Ecological relationships: p 88
1. A habitat is the place where an animal or plant lives. A microhabitat is a small part of a habitat.
2. Answer depends on students. Following is a sample answer: 
Our habitat is an urban city consisting of buildings and roads. We live in a house which is in a street 
where there are other houses and people living in them. There are parks and open spaces; crowded 
streets and bazaars. There are hospitals and schools. There are lots of cars, buses, rickshaws, cycles 
and motorcycles. People keep pets in their homes, meanwhile there are stray cats and dogs too.
3. a) A species is a group of organisms of the same type that live and breed successfully together to 
produce fertile offspring.
b) Human beings belong to the species Homo sapiens
4. See answer 2 above.
5. Organisms that live in a woodland community are: trees, shrubs, grasses, birds, mice, and 
squirrels.
A woodland community: p 89
1. The tree layer consists of large trees with big trunks. Their leaves form an umbrella-like canopy 
covering the rest of the wood.
2. a) A herbaceous plant is a non-woody plant. Examples include grasses, ferns and woodland flowers 
such as primrose and bluebell.
3. a) Mice and ants.
b) Mosses and lichens.
4. Grasshoppers usually live in the field layer as they find their food there. Also they are green and 
therefore well-protected from birds and other insect-eating animals which live in the tree and the 
shrub layers.
A pond community: p 90
1. A pond community can be divided into four zones: open water zone, deep water zone, swamp zone, 
and the marsh zone.
2. a) Animals of the swamp zone are: frogs, newts, snails, and insects.
b) Plants of the swamp zone include: water iris, water crowfoot, and water lily.
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any Convert all pages or certain pages chosen by users; download & perpetual update. Start Image DICOM PDF Converting.
delete page in pdf document; add remove pages from pdf
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support conversion of Bitmap - PDF files in both single & batch mode; Convert all pages or certain
delete pages from pdf file online; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
85
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Counting populations: p 91
1. Number of squares containing plantains = 7/25
Frequency of plantains = 7/25 x 100 = 28%
Total number of plantains in quadrat = 6
Approximate number of plantains that would fit in one square = 2
Number of squares filled = 6 / 2 = 3
∴ Percentage cover of plantains = 3 / 25 x 100 = 12%
2. Daisies are most frequent. 
3. Plantains cover most ground. 
4. The smaller the plant the larger its frequency with a comparatively smaller percentage cover. The 
bigger the plant the smaller its frequency, with a comparatively larger percentage cover.
Counting animals: p 92
1. A sweep net can be used to collect insects and spiders from the ground, field and shrub layers. 
Animals can also be collected from ponds and streams in a similar way. Once collected, the animals 
can be identified and kept in suitable containers until the count is finished. When all the animals have 
been counted, they should be released safely back into their natural habitats.
2. A sweep net can be used to capture the fish and they can be kept in a tub full of water so that they 
do not die.
3. Animals should be released safely back in their natural habitats after they have been counted, 
otherwise it will upset food chains and food webs. It will disturb the natural balance of populations 
in a habitat.
4. This method is very useful if you want to count the number of individuals in one species.
Method: 
• Capture the first random sample.
• Mark the animals of the species.
• Release the marked animals back into the populations and allow to mix.
• A second random sample is taken.
The estimated population size can be calculated using the following formula:
number of first sample x number in second sample 
number of marked animals in the second sample
Producers and consumers: p 93
1. Animals that feed on the producers are called primary consumers, while animals that feed on the 
primary consumers are called secondary consumers.
2. a) i) plant plankton  ii) animal plankton  iii) sand eel
b) i) When the mackerel eats animal plankton as well as a herring.
ii) plant plankton ‡ animal plankton ‡ herring ‡mackerel 
c) plant plankton ‡ animal plankton ‡ sand eel ‡ cod
On following the food chain above, we can see that plant plankton is the producer, animal 
plankton is the primary consumer, herring is the secondary consumer, mackerel is the tertiary 
consumer, and cod is the quaternary consumer.
Investigating leaf litter: p 94 
1. Leaf litter ‡ insects and millipedes ‡ spiders ‡ centipedes
2. There is more biomass of leaf litter organisms in summer than in winter because there is more food 
available to them in summer and they grow and reproduce more.
3. Trees shed their leaves in winter which means that there is less food for the organisms so most of 
them die during winter.
4. a) Leaf litter organisms live in dark, warm conditions.
b) Leaf litter organisms live in damp conditions and the damp absorbent paper provides them that 
kind of environment.
c) To get accurate results.
d) Each type of animal is the food for another, so they cannot be kept together.
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
86
Ecological pyramids (1): a pyramid of numbers: p 95
1. A pyramid of numbers represents the number of living things in each link of the chain.
2. The pyramid of numbers shows information in the form of a bar chart. 
3. The length of each bar represents the number of living things in each link in a chain.
4. Pyramids of numbers can be of many different shapes because the number of living things in each 
link of the chain can vary. For example, a single oak tree is the producer in the food chain. Thousands 
of caterpillars feed on the oak tree. Small birds feed on the caterpillars. Hundreds of fleas could be 
feeding on the blood of the birds. The pyramid for this food chain would be a very strange shape.
5. 
Ecological pyramids (2): a pyramid of biomass: p 96
1. Biomass is the word used to describe the mass of living material in an ecosystem.
2. Students should measure their mass in kilograms.
3. A pyramid of numbers represents the number of living things in each link in a chain, whereas a 
pyramid of biomass represents the mass of the organisms in each link in a chain.
The similarity is that both types of information can be represented in the form of pyramids.
4. a)
b) They need to weigh all the organisms because they are taking biomass into consideration while 
drawing this pyramid.
c)  The biomass of the centipedes would be doubled as the biomass of the woodlice is doubled.  
Energy flow through ecosystems: p 97
1. The Sun is the source of energy for nearly all living things.
2. Plants use energy for:
• respiration
• some of it is stored in the form of starch
• some of it is used to build chemicals like proteins and fats
3. Locked up energy inside the body is in the form of fat and proteins that are stored inside the body. 
4. After passing through the food chain the energy is finally lost as heat to the environment.
5. 1,000,000 kJ of energy from the Sun hits the grass. Most of the Sun’s energy, about 978,000 kJ, is 
lost to the surroundings as light energy is reflected from plants. 22,000 kJ of energy is taken by the 
grass. Only about 2,000 kJ of energy is used by the grass in respiration.
6. Energy flow along a food chain is very inefficient. It makes more sense to eat plants rather than 
animals as lots of energy is lost, mainly as heat, at each stage.
Test yourself: p 98–99
1. a) duckweed ‡ snail ‡ water beetle
milfoil ‡ tadpole ‡ beetle larva
b)  i) snail 
ii) water beetle 
iii) stickleback 
iv) fungi and bacteria
c) Snails would increase in number.
d) Decomposers break down the dead bodies of animals and plants and return the nutrients back 
to the soil.
��������
������������
��������
����������
��������
������
87
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
2 a) A  represents a pyramid which has a single producer, large number of primary consumers, and 
a small number of secondary consumers.
B represents a pyramid which has a large number of producers, a small number of primary 
consumers, and a single secondary consumer.
C represents a pyramid which has a large number of producers, and a small number of 
consumers.
D represents a pyramid which has a single producer, a small number of primary consumers, 
and a large number of secondary consumers.
3. a) i)  5 to 9 stations 
ii) 12 and 13 stations
b) i)  marsh pennywort  ii) bramble 
c) i) In the sand dune area (5 to 8 stations). This is marked by a square on the graph.
ii) Sedge and marsh pennywort are adapted for living in marshy places as they have long, thin 
leaves, whereas marram grass and bramble have dry, spiky leaves and thorns and are adapted 
for living in dry sandy places. 
4. a) i)  
ii)
iii) In the pyramid of numbers the producer in the food chain is a single tree, which is fed upon 
by thousands of insects. This is followed by 40 small birds and later 3 birds of prey. Thus 
the irregular shape. 
In the biomass pyramid, the levels indicate the masses of the organisms involved. Obviously 
a tree is much heavier than thousands of insects put together. As a result, we get a regular 
pyramid.
b) i)  Counting all the insects is not possible.   ii)  By the capture-recapture method.
c) There is a vast difference in the biomass of the primary and secondary consumers.  
5. a) i)  algae ‡ water fleas ‡ minnows
ii)  algae ‡ water fleas ‡ minnows ‡ perch ‡ heron
b) i) algae  
ii) water fleas  iii) minnow  
iv) heron
Workbook 2, chapter 10
1. Words  
Descriptions
Habitat  
The place where an animal or plant lives.
Species  
The group of organisms of the same type that can breed and produce fertile 
offspring.
Population  
A breeding group of animals or plants.
Community  
A collection of different plant and animal species living together in a habitat.
Dominant species 
The species with the largest number of individuals in a community.
2. a) At noon
b) Oak wood
c) i) Yes   ii)  More growth of plants in the wood where more light is reaching the floor.
d) i) Rotted leaves mixed with soil in the oak wood provide nutrients to growing plants.
ii) Soak some bean seeds in water for about 24 hours. Put half of the seeds in a dish containing 
dry sawdust, place the other half in a dish containing moist soil mixed with garden fertilizer. 
Observe the seeds daily to find out which seedlings have grown best. 
3. a) 1516
b) The number of grasshoppers would be greatly reduced.
c) The number of lizards available are able to suffice the need of only one hawk.
�������������
�����������
�������
����
�������������
�����������
�������
����
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
88
4. a) 
b) A true pyramid has a wide base and a narrow apex. This is a pyramid of numbers and it shows 
that one rose bush can feed 4000 green flies and 4000 green flies can feed 100 ladybirds. 
c) A pyramid of numbers shows the number of living things in an ecosystem. A pyramid of biomass 
shows the mass of living material in an ecosystem.
d)
5. a)
b) Lots of grass and few plants are found in the middle pitch with hardly any bare earth. 
Comparatively, lots of bare earth is found at the goal mouth. Also small amount of grass and a 
few plantains occur at the goal mouth; however, there is no presence of daisies there.
c) There is more trampling of grass near the goal mouth.
d) Plantain is hardier than daisy.
6. Energy flows through an ecosystem in a straight line. Producers convert the light energy from the 
Sun into chemical energy in sugar molecules. Some of this is used by plants in respiration, while the 
rest is stored as starch or used up to build other chemicals such as fat and protein. When consumers 
feed on plants they release this stored energy and use it for activities such as moving. Some energy, 
however, will be locked up in the animal’s body as fat and protein.
���������
���������
��������
����
���������
���������
��������
����
���
��
��
��
��
���
�����
�����
��������
������������
����������
����������
����������������
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested