89
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
7. a) i) light 
ii) chemical energy
b) A lot of energy is lost at each stage.
c) i) urine and faeces  ii) respiration
d) 3000 – 2875 = 125 kJ
e) They absorb 17,000 kJ of energy out of 22,000 kJ from the grass. Very little energy is left for 
the other animals.
Problems to solve
1. How do people disturb the balance of living things? Mention as many ways as you can. 
2. Why must we be very careful about any changes that we make in the Earth and its living things?
3. Would you expect to find a balance of numbers in a region where people have never gone? Give 
reasons for your answer.
4. When too many plants start growing, how is a balance of numbers restored? When too few plants 
grow, how is the balance of numbers restored?
5. Make a list of the ways in which animals and plants help each other. Make another list of the ways 
in which animals and plants harm each other.
6. The graph shows the affect of adding some Paramecium (single-celled animals) to a population of 
yeast.
Study the graph carefully and then answer the questions:
a) What happens to the yeast population as soon as the paramecium is added?
b) Why is there a time lag between the two population cycles?
c) If the Paramecium were removed, suggest what might happen to the yeast population.
Solutions to problems
1. Cutting down forests, ploughing up grasslands, sowing crops, destroying plants and animals that are 
not wanted, bringing in new kinds of plants and animals, using poisons that kill helpful insects and 
also harmful insects used as food by birds, frogs, toads and fish.  
2. In a community of living things, the struggle for existence results in a balance of numbers. The kinds 
of animals and plants that live in the community are suited to the climate, soil, and other conditions. 
Year after year, there are about the same numbers of the same kinds of living things. Some kinds of 
animal or plant may upset the balance now and then. Suppose that people move into a region where 
certain kinds of plants and animals have been living together for hundreds or even thousands of 
�����������������������������������
������������
��
��
��
��
��
������
����������
Delete page on pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete pages in pdf
Delete page on pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page pdf acrobat reader; delete pages from a pdf in preview
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
90
years. Trees are cut down in the forests. Grasslands are ploughed up and sowed with crops. Plants 
that people do not require are destroyed. Many animals are killed. New kinds of plants and animals 
are brought in. Before long, the balance of numbers is completely upset. The new conditions that 
people provide may be helpful to some kinds of living things. These kinds will live and reproduce in 
larger numbers. However, the new conditions may be harmful to other kinds of living things. These 
kinds will be reduced in number until they finally or nearly disappear.
People have disturbed the balance in many ways. When grasslands are ploughed up, dust storms 
sweep away much of the soil. Cutting down forests results in terrible floods. Insecticides such as 
DDT kill flies, mosquitoes, and other pests. Unfortunately, these chemicals also kill bees and other 
helpful insects. If too many insects are killed with poisons, birds that feed on those insects may die 
from lack of food. The same thing may happen to frogs, toads and fish.
There are many reasons why we need to conserve the living things in our communities. Any change 
that we make in the earth and its living things may have far-reaching effects. We cannot always tell 
ahead of time just what these effects will be. So we must be careful when we disturb the balance of 
living things in our communities. If we disturb it too much, we may in turn cause ourselves serious 
harm.
3. Yes. Over a long period of time, the living things would probably have reached a balance undisturbed 
by people. But any recent change in conditions, caused by a fire, flood, drought, etc., could upset the 
balance even if people had never been there.
4. a) There is not enough food, air, water, light or room for all of them. Many of them die before they 
are fully grown and can produce young. So their number decreases.
b) With fewer plants competing for the things they need, many become full grown and produce 
young. So their number increases.
5. a) Animals help plants by scattering seeds, cultivating the soil (earthworms), eating insects (birds), 
carrying [pollen to flowers (bees and other insects). Plants help animals by providing them with 
food and shelter. Other ways may be given. 
b) Animals harm plants by using them as food (parasites). Some plants are poisonous to animals. 
Others, such as bacteria, moulds, and yeasts may cause diseases in animals. (Many other 
examples of living things harming each other may be given). 
6. a) The yeast population begins to fall. 
b) It takes time for the organisms to grow, to reproduce and multiply.
c) The yeast population will grow rapidly and will ultimately die out as there will be a limited amount 
of food for it to survive.
Multiple Choice Questions
1. What is a group of organisms of the same type that live and breed successfully together called?
 population 
 community 
 species 
D  genus  
2. Which layer in a wood contains mosses and lichens?
 tree layer 
 shrub layer 
 field layer 
 ground layer  
3.  Where in a pond can you find water lilies?
 open water zone 
 deep water zone 
 swamp zone 
 marsh zone
4. What are the producers in a marine ecosystem?
 green algae 
 pond weed 
 blue/green algae 
D  trees  
5. Which one of the following is a tertiary consumer in this food chain?
plant plankton ‡ animal plankton ‡ sand eel ‡ cod
 plant plankton 
 animal plankton 
C  sand eel 
 cod  
6. How many trophic levels are there in this food chain?
Oak tree ‡ caterpillars ‡ birds ‡ fleas
 1 
 2 
 3 
D  4   
7. What is the source of energy for all living things?
 trees 
 herbivores 
 carnivores 
D  the Sun  
8. Producers convert light energy from the Sun into 
energy in food.
 heat 
 light 
 electrical 
D  chemical  
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete blank pages from pdf file; delete pages of pdf preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete page in pdf reader; delete pdf pages online
91
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
9. Energy flow along a food chain is lost at each stage mainly as
 heat energy 
 light energy 
 chemical energy 
D  electrical energy          
10. When consumers feed on plants they release stored energy by
 excretion and digestion 
 respiration and digestion
 circulation and digestion 
 respiration and excretion  
Answers
1. C 
2. D 
3. C 
4. C 
5. D
6. D 
7. D 
8. D 
9. A 
10. B
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete a page in a pdf file; delete pages out of a pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a to remove a specific image from PDF document page. PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component.
delete page on pdf document; add and delete pages in pdf
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
92
The rock cycle
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
11
Unit flow chart
Igneous rocks
Sedimentary rocks
Metamorphic rocks
The rock cycle
Aims and learning objectives
• To introduce the major rock forming processes and show how they are linked together in the rock cycle
• To show how rock texture can be used to identify rocks
• To understand that the rock cycle links together the processes of rock formation
Background information
You probably think that our planet is hard, solid and safe, but there is a lot of evidence to show that this is 
not the case. The Earth’s crust is constantly moving and can sometimes react violently. By carefully studying 
the vibrations and sudden movements in the Earth’s crust, scientists can sometimes predict a big earthquake 
or the eruption of a volcano. This can help save thousands of lives.
The processes inside the Earth that cause volcanoes also form all our rocks and minerals. We use these as 
building materials, extract metals from them, and use them as fuels and raw materials, for our industries. It 
is important to study the internal structure of the Earth so that we can make the most of our resources.
Scientists who study rocks are called geologists. They get information about the inside of the Earth in four 
main ways: 
By studying the rocks on the surface of the planet, by studying the materials ejected from volcanoes, by 
recording vibrations inside the Earth, and by drilling deep down into the crust and taking rock samples.
The Earth is thought to be made up of three layers:
The core: it has two parts, a solid inner core consisting of a mixture of nickel and iron, and an outer core made 
of molten iron and some other elements. The temperature of the core is between 3,700°C and 4,500°C.
The mantle: it is a little more complex. Near the core the rocks are made mainly of iron and magnesium 
silicates. Nearer to the surface the mantle is composed of igneous rocks. Mantle temperatures are between 
1000 and 3700°C.
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Able to delete text characters
delete pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX a specific image from PDF document page in VB.NET PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component in
delete page pdf file reader; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
93
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
The crust: it is a thin layer of rocks directly under our feet. It contains rocks of lower density such as basalt 
and granite. Temperatures are very much cooler than those found inside the Earth. 
Unit introduction
Additional activity 1
Imagine you are making a journey to the centre of the Earth. Describe the conditions that you would find 
as you travel from the surface to the inner core.
Teaching procedure
For many generations people have tried to work out the age of the Earth. Parts of its surface are extremely 
old— up to 4500 million years.
The whole of Earth history is divided up into four major divisions called eras. Each era is further subdivided 
into periods or epochs. Rocks formed in these periods are named accordingly, for example, the rocks formed 
about 500 million years ago belong to the Cambrian period. 
The geological eras
Era 
Period 
Approximate 
number of years ago 
(millions of years) 
Cenozoic 
Quaternary 
0.01
Tertiary 
2–58
Mesozoic 
Cretaceous 
65
Jurassic 
136
Triassic 
190
Paleozoic 
Permian 
225
Carboniferous 
280
Devonian 
345
Silurian 
405
Ordovician 
425
Cambrian 
500
Precambrian 
600
Additional activity 2
Copy and complete the table using the information from the table of geological eras.
Rock 
Age (million years) 
Era 
Period
Granite 
385
Basalt 
10
Peridotite 
70
Sandstone 
300
Limestone
320
Additional activity 3
Study the table of the geological eras and answer the following questions:
1. Fossils of fish are found in the Ordovician period. How long ago did fish appear on the Earth?
2. Fossils of dinosaurs are found in Cretaceous rocks but not in Tertiary rocks. Explain why?
3. How long ago did dinosaurs become extinct?
4. Coal deposits are from the carboniferous period. How old is a lump of coal?
Ask the students: what are rocks made up of?
Explain that rocks are made of mineral particles cemented together or crystallized into a large mass.
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
BurnAnnotation: Burn all annotations to PDF page. DeleteAnnotation: Delete all selected annotations. guidance for you to create and add a PDF document viewer &
delete page pdf file; delete pages pdf files
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in code able to help users delete text characters to pull text out of selected PDF page or all
delete pages on pdf; reader extract pages from pdf
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
94
Ask the students: what are minerals? Where do they come from?
Explain that minerals occur naturally in the Earth’s crust. They usually have a definite chemical composition 
and physical structures. Some minerals have very attractive colours and crystal shapes and are used for 
decoration. Rubies, diamonds, sapphires, topaz, and emeralds are examples. Other minerals are used as 
sources of metals. Most minerals are mixtures or compounds of several elements, for example, galena is a 
mineral made from atoms of lead and sulphur. 
Additional activity 4: Model of an erupting volcano
Materials: an empty coke bottle, warm water, liquid soap, baking soda, vinegar, a basin, some sand, a 
few drops of red colour.
Method: Divide the class into groups of four. Have the students add a few drops of red colour to a cup of 
warm water and pour it into the bottle. Stand the bottle in a mound of sand in the basin. Now add a few 
drops of liquid soap to the water. Add a teaspoon of baking soda to the warm water. Add a tea spoon of 
vinegar to the solution and see what happens.
Explain that when magma comes to the surface of the Earth and flows out of the volcano it is called 
lava.
Ask the students: what are the main elements in the Earth’s crust?
Show the students a bar graph of the elements in the Earth’s crust and explain that if you look at the bar 
graph you will notice that the two most abundant elements in the Earth’s crust are oxygen and silicon. 
It is therefore no great surprise that the most common rock forming minerals are metal silicates. These 
compounds contain a metal, oxygen and silicon joined together. Granite, stone and slate are all silicate 
rocks, though there are a great many more. All silicates are resistant to chemical change. That is why they 
are used in the building industry. 
Additional activity 5: Model of sedimentary rock
Materials: four transparent plastic glasses for each group, sand.
Divide the class into groups of four and give each group four plastic glasses and some sand. 
Method: Fill each glass with a quarter of an inch of sand. Place one glass inside another. Several layers 
of sand will be seen through the clear plastic glasses.
Explain that the sand in the glasses is like a layer of sediment that settles out. The layers fall one on top 
of the other. All the layers are pressed together and form a piece of sedimentary rock. Sedimentary rock is 
made up of small particles or fragments that once belonged to another rock before it began to erode.
��
��
��
��
��
��������������������������������������
������
�������
���������
����
�������
������
��������������
���������
���������
����������������������
95
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
Additional activity 6: To study igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks
Materials: assorted igneous rocks such as granite, pumice, quartz and basalt, metamorphic rocks such as 
marble, slate, quartzite, and sedimentary rocks such as sand stone, shale lime stone, clay conglomerates 
(rocks composed of small pebbles cemented together by mud that has become rock), coal, and a 
magnifying glass.
Method: Divide the class into groups of four. Provide each group with samples of the different types of rocks 
and a magnifying glass. Ask them to observe the rock samples with the magnifying glass and sort them 
into the different types according to their structures. Discuss where the various rocks might be used. 
Answers
The rock cycle: p 100
1. Rocks that form because of heat or fire due to volcanic eruptions or from magma, are called igneous 
rocks or fire rocks. 
2. a) Magma is molten rock.
b) It comes from the mantle of the Earth.
3. High pressures build up beneath the Earth’s crust and this eventually causes a volcano to erupt.
4. The size of the crystals depends upon how long the magma takes to cool down. Slow cooling produces 
big crystals and rapid cooling produces small crystals.
Igneous rocks: p 101
1. Molten rock inside the Earth is called magma. Once on the Earth’s surface, molten rock is called 
lava.
2. Volcanoes are formed when lava and ash are thrown violently from the Earth.
3. a) Granite and basalt are formed by the cooling down of molten rocks from the mantle of the 
Earth.
b) i) Granite and basalt are both igneous rocks which are very hard.
ii) The size of their crystals is different. Granite has big crystals whereas basalt crystals are 
small.
4. The holes occur because of the bubbles of gas that are trapped inside the rock as the lava quickly 
cools down. 
5. Pumice has holes in it like a sponge. This is why it can float 
Sedimentary rocks: p 102
1. Air, water, and heat from the Sun break down rocks into small pieces.
2. These pieces are carried along by rivers to the sea.
3. Over millions of years, pressure from other deposits push the sediment together until, eventually, a 
sedimentary rock is formed.
4. Although sedimentary rocks are all made in the same way they are not all the same. This is because 
the sediments from which they are made can be very different.
5. Pebbles in conglomerate rock are held together with calcium carbonate.
Limestone—another sedimentary rock: p 103
1. Limestone is different from other sedimentary rocks because it is made from the shells and bones of 
sea creatures instead of from rock particles.
2. Calcium carbonate
3. Minerals in the limestone can change its colour. 
4. Limestone also has different levels of hardness.
5. a) In the ancient seas, sea sponges had skeletons made of silica. When they died, their skeletons 
built up in layers. The silica dissolved then re-crystallized as flint.
Metamorphic rocks: p 104
1. Metamorphism means change of form.
2. Many sedimentary and igneous rocks have been subjected to different conditions of temperature and 
pressure since they were formed. These processes produce a new group of rocks called metamorphic 
rocks.
3. Marble, sandstone and quartzite.
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
96
4. An intrusion is the pushing up of magma into a rock.
5. Marble is formed by the intrusion of magma into beds of limestone.
6. a) Slate is a dull grey rock which was formed when sedimentary shale was compressed deep 
underground. Under pressure the tiny mud grains in the shale were changed into flat crystals. 
These crystals grew into layers.
b) Slate is useful as a roofing material because it splits easily into flat sheets. 
And so the rock cycle is complete: p 105
1. Igneous rocks are weathered and eroded. The debris is transported then dumped to eventually become 
sedimentary rock. This may be buried deep and changed by heat and pressure and then be lifted to 
form a mountain range only to be eroded again. The rock cycle goes on and on. 
2. a) Lava from volcanoes flows along mountain slopes, sediment is transported by rivers to the sea, 
where it gets buried under layers of more sediment and eventually becomes molten due to 
immense heat and pressure.
b) It would take almost 4500 million years. [Hint: study the table of the geological eras and calculate 
the time period] 
3. Water transports the sediment from the river to the sea.
4. a) and  b) Answers depend on students.
Test yourself: p 106–107
1. a) High pressure beneath the Earth’s crust pushes the molten rock to the surface of a volcano.
b) i) Bubbles of gas released from molten lava make it frothy and sponge-like.
ii) Pumice floats on water because it has sponge-like holes in it.
c) They are made from the molten rocks inside the mantle of the Earth. 
d) The crystals of granite are larger than those of basalt because granite took longer to cool 
down.
2. a) Material that settles at the bottom of a liquid is called sediment. 
b) The shells and bones of sea creatures.
c) When sea creatures whose shells or skeletons were made of calcium carbonate died and sank to 
the bottom of the sea, their bodies decayed but their shells formed a layer on the sea floor. As 
more and more layers built up, the pressure crushed the shells and skeletons and squashed the 
particles together. Some calcium carbonate dissolved in the warm water and as the layers were 
squashed closer and closer, the particles of calcium carbonate were cemented together to form 
limestone. 
d) Minerals give limestone different colours.
e) Some limestone is hard enough to polish shiny surfaces; others are very soft and can be easily 
scratched and carved.
3. a) An intrusion is very hot magma that is pushed into rock.
b) Molten rock comes from the mantle.
c) i) marble ii) It is made up of crystals which are close together.
iii) It is used for making statues.
d) There are more crystals at X because the rocks cooled slowly. Rocks at Y cooled quickly.
4. 
Rock 
Type
sandstone 
sedimentary
granite 
igneous
marble 
metamorphic
limestone 
sedimentary
slate 
metamorphic
pumice 
igneous
5. a) i)  igneous rock   ii)  granite  
b) Lava flowing down.
97
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
c) i)  sedimentary rock   ii)  limestone
d) i)  metamorphic rock   ii)  marble 
e) Magma is molten rock.
f) By rivers
g) The energy needed to drive the rock cycle comes from the mantle.
Workbook 2, chapter 11
1. Depositing rock particles  
broken glass dumped into bottom of furnace
Rock melting deep beneath the Earth’s crust   
broken glass melted in hot furnace 
Molten rock cools to make new rock 
glass cools, new bottle made 
Weathering of rocks 
bottles broken in bottle bank
Molten rock pushed upwards into older rocks 
molten glass poured into mould
Transporting rock particles  
broken glass taken to bottle maker
2. a) i) slate 
ii) chalk  
iii) sandstone  iv) marble
b) Both are affected by acid.
c) Sandstone has grains in it. Granite is made of crystals.
3. a) Calcium carbonate
b) CaCO
c) The colour is due to the minerals present in it.
d) It is soft enough to be carved.
e) i) & ii) Limestone is a type of sedimentary rock. It is different from other rocks of this type because 
it is made from shells and bones of sea creatures. 
4. a) i) It will become hot  ii) It will change into marble.
b) i) They are both metamorphic rocks.
ii) Compared to limestone, the new rock will be harder.
c) i) metamorphic rock  ii) quartzite 
5. a) i) magma   ii)  It comes from deep within the mantle.
b) Bubbles of gas are released from molten lava making it frothy. Pumice is formed when this 
solidifies.
c) i) They are made of crystals. 
ii) The size of the crystals is different.
iii) Slow cooling of crystals produce big crystals. Rapid cooling produces small crystals.
6. 
sedimentary 
rock
metamorphic
rock
heat
magma
volcano
igneous
rock
weathering
transport
uplift
deposition
melting
S
CIENCE
F
ACT
FILE
T
EACHER
S
G
UIDE
2
98
7. Rocks may contain fossils. They were formed from the remains of animals and plants which were 
buried with sediment millions of years ago. Sometimes complete parts of the animal or plant were 
preserved. More often, however, a print of the animal or plant was left. The parts of the animals were 
replaced by chemicals which filled the same shape.
The type of fossil in an area gives information about the area’s history.
Project
Make a display of the rocks on a table in a corner of the classroom. 
Discuss each rock and what it is called. Explain that the shine and sparkle of some of the rocks is called 
lustre. Some rocks are hard. A very hard rock cannot be scratched by another rock; the hardest rock of all is 
diamond. The softest rock is talc. Talc rubs off on any surface that rubs against it. 
Write the Moh’s hardness scale on a chart paper and discuss it with the class.
1. talc— can be scratched with a finger nail.
2. gypsum—can be scratched by a finger nail
3. calcite—can be scratched by a coin
4. fluorite—can be scratched by a knife
5. apatite—can almost be scratched by a knife
6. feldspar—will scratch a knife blade
7. quartz—will scratch a piece of glass
8. topaz—will scratch topaz
9. corundum—will scratch topaz
10. diamond—will scratch any rocks that are softer than it.
Multiple Choice Questions
1. The largest volcano in the solar system is on
 Mercury 
 Venus 
 Earth 
D  Mars
2. Molten rocks inside the Earth are called
 lava 
 magma 
 granite 
D  basalt
3. Which one of the following is not a property of granite?
 It is very hard rock.  
 It contains large crystals.
 It is easy to scratch.  
 It does not react with acid.  
4.  What is the main difference between granite and basalt?
 It is very hard rock  
 It is difficult to scratch
 It contains tiny crystals 
 It does not react with acid  
5. What is the name of the rock which is light and frothy?
 granite 
 pumice 
 basalt 
D  diamond
6. Which type of sedimentary rock is made from pebbles cemented together with calcium carbonate?
 shale 
 sandstone 
 conglomerate 
D  limestone
7. What are the shells or skeletons of sea organisms made up of?   
 calcium silicate 
 calcium carbonate C  calcium oxalate 
D  calcium oxide
8. Metamorphism means change of
 shape 
 size 
 form 
D  length  
9. Which one of the following is not a metamorphic rock?
 marble 
 quartzite 
 slate 
D  sandstone
10. Limestone can be of many different colours due to the presence of
 stones 
 sand 
 minerals 
D  sea shells
Answers
1. D 
2. B 
3. C 
4. C 
5. B
6. C 
7. B 
8. C 
9. D 
10. C
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested