c# mvc website pdf file in stored in byte array display in browser : Add remove pages from pdf Library SDK component .net wpf azure mvc The%20Art%20of%20Unit%20Testing%20with%20Examples%20in%20.NET%20(Manning%202009)7-part1068

Summary 
45
Name  your  tests  clearly  using  the  following  model:  [Metho-
dUnderTest]_[Scenario]_[ExpectedBehavior].
Use  the 
[SetUp]
and 
[TearDown]
attributes  to  reuse  code  in  your 
tests, such as code for creating and initializing objects all your tests 
use.
Don’t use 
[SetUp]
and 
[TearDown]
to initialize or destroy objects that 
aren’t shared 
throughout 
the test class in all the tests, because it makes 
the  tests  less  understandable.  Someone  reading  your  code  won’t 
know which tests use the logic inside the setup method
and which 
don’t.
In the next chapter, we’ll look at more real-world scenarios, where the 
code to be tested is a little more realistic than what you’ve seen so far. 
It has dependencies and testability problems, and we’ll start discussing 
the notion of integration tests versus unit tests, and what that means to 
us as developers who write tests and want to ensure our code’s quality.
Add remove pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; copy page from pdf
Add remove pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add and remove pages from pdf file online; add and delete pages in pdf online
46
CHAPTER 2    A first unit test
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
manipulations. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB
delete blank page in pdf online; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Remove the password. doc.Save(outputFilePath); C# Sample Code: Add Password to Plain PDF
delete pdf pages ipad; add remove pages from pdf
Part 2
Core techniques
aving covered the basics in previous chapters, we’ll now introduce the 
core testing and refactoring techniques that are necessary for writing 
tests in the real world.
In chapter 3, we’ll begin by learning about stubs and how they help us 
break dependencies.  We’ll go over refactoring techniques  that make 
code more testable, and we’ll learn about seams in the process. 
Then, in chapter 4, we’ll move on to mock objects and interaction test-
ing and look at how mock objects differ from stubs. 
Lastly, in chapter 5, we’ll look at isolation frameworks (also known as 
mock object frameworks) and  how they solve  some of the  repetitive 
coding involved in handwritten mocks and stubs. Chapter 5 also com-
pares the leading isolation frameworks in .NET and uses Rhino Mocks 
for examples, showing its API in common use cases.
H
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
delete pages from a pdf file; delete pdf pages in preview
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Add metadata to PDF document in C# .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file. Also a PDF metadata extraction control.
delete pages pdf preview; delete pdf pages acrobat
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Help to add or insert bookmark and outline into PDF file in .NET framework. Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document.
delete page pdf; delete a page from a pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
cut pages from pdf online; delete pages from a pdf document
49
Using stubs to break 
dependencies
This chapter covers
•Defining stubs
•Refactoring code to use stubs
•Overcoming encapsulation problems in code
•Exploring best practices when using stubs
n  the  previous  chapter,  we  wrote  our  first  unit  test  using  NUnit  and 
explored  the  different  testing  attributes  that  are  available,  such  as 
[ExpectedException]
[SetUp]
,  and 
[TearDown]
.  We  also  built  tests  for 
simple use cases, where all we had to check on were simple return values 
from simple objects.
In this chapter,  we’ll  take a look at  more  realistic  examples where the 
object under test relies on another object over which we have no control 
(or which doesn’t work yet). That object could be a web service, the time 
of day, threading, or many other things. The important point is that our 
test can’t control what that dependency returns to our code under test or 
how  it  behaves  (if  we  wanted  to  simulate an  exception,  for  example). 
That’s when we use 
stubs
.
I
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
delete page from pdf online; delete page in pdf file
VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in
Add permanent metadata to PDF document in VB .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata content from PDF file in Visual Basic .NET application.
delete pages in pdf reader; delete pages from pdf preview
50
CHAPTER 3    Using stubs to break dependencies
Flying people into space presents  interesting challenges to engineers 
and astronauts, one of the more difficult being how to make sure the 
astronaut is ready to go into space and operate all the machinery. A full 
integration test 
for a space shuttle would require being in space, and that’s 
obviously not a safe way to test astronauts. That’s why NASA has full 
simulators that mimic the surroundings of a space shuttle’s control deck, 
which removes the external dependency of having to be in outer space.
DEFINITION 
An 
external dependency
is an object in your system that your code under 
test  interacts  with,  and  over  which  you  have  no  control.  (Common 
examples are filesystems, threads, memory, time, and so on.)
Controlling external dependencies in your code is the topic that this 
chapter, and most of this book, will be dealing with. In programming, 
we use 
stubs
to get around the problem of external dependencies. 
DEFINITION
stub
is a controllable replacement for an existing dependency (or 
col-
laborator
) in the system. By using a stub, you can test your code with-
out dealing with the dependency directly. 
Let’s look at a real example and make things a bit more complicated for 
our 
LogAnalyzer
class, introduced in the previous chapters. We’ll try to 
untangle a dependency against the filesystem.
3.1 Introducing stubs
Test pattern names
xUnit Test Patterns
 by Gerard Meszaros 
is a classic pattern reference book 
for uni
t test
ing.
 It defines patterns for things we fake 
in our tests 
in at 
least five ways,
 which I feel
 confuses people (al
though 
i
t’s detailed)
.
 In 
this book,
 I chose to use only three defini
t
ions for fake things 
in tests:
fakes,
 stubs,
 and mocks.
 I feel
 that this simplificat
ion of terms makes 
i
easy for readers to digest the patterns,
 and that there’s no need to know 
more than those three to get started and wri
te great tests.
 In various 
places 
in the book,
 though,
 I w
ill
 refer to the pattern names used 
in 
xUnit 
Test Patterns
 so that you can easily refer to that defini
t
ion 
if you’d 
like.
Identifying a filesystem dependency in LogAn
51
Our 
LogAnalyzer
class application can be configured to handle multiple 
log filename extensions using a special adapter for each file. For the 
sake of simplicity, let’s assume that the allowed  filenames are stored 
somewhere on disk as a configuration setting for the application, and 
that the 
IsValidLogFileName
method looks like this:
public bool IsValidLogFileName(string fileName)
{
//read through the configuration file
//return true if configuration says extension is supported.
}
The problem that arises, as depicted in figure 3.1, is that, once this test 
depends on the filesystem, we’re performing an integration test, and we 
have all the associated problems: integration tests are slower to  run, 
they need configuration, they test multiple things, and so on.
This is the essence of 
test-inhibiting
design: the code 
has  some  dependency  on  an  external  resource, 
which might break the test even though the code’s 
logic is perfectly valid. In legacy systems, a single 
class or method might have many dependencies on 
external resources over which your test code has lit-
tle, if any, control. Chapter 9 touches more on this 
subject.
Figure 3.1 Our method has a direct dependency on the 
filesystem. Our design of the object model under test 
inhibits us from testing it as a unit test; it promotes 
integration testing.
3.2 Identifying a filesystem dependency in LogAn
resorting to integration testing.
If we look at the astronaut analogy we started out with, we can see that 
there’s a definite pattern for breaking the dependency:
1
Find the 
interface 
the astronaut example, this was the joysticks and monitors of the 
space shuttle, as depicted in figure 3.2.
2
Replace the 
underlying implementation
that you have control over. This involved hooking up  the various 
shuttle monitors, joysticks, and buttons to a control room where test 
engineers were able to control what the space shuttle 
showing to the astronauts under test.
Transferring this pattern to our code requires more steps: 
1
Find the 
interface
case, “interface” isn’t used in the pure object-oriented sense; it refers to 
the defined method or class being collaborated with.) In our LogAn 
2
If the interface is 
case—we’re calling directly into the filesystem), make the code test-
able by adding a level of indirection to the interface. In our example, 
moving the direct call to the filesystem to a separate class (such as 
FileExtensionManager
tion. We’ll also look at others. (Figure 3.3 shows  how the design 
might look after this step.)
3
Replace the 
underlying implementation
something that you have control over. In our case, we’ll replace the 
instance of the class that our method calls (
with a stub class that we can control (
our test code control over external dependencies.
Our replacement instance will 
breaks the dependency on the filesystem. Because we aren’t testing the 
class that talks to the filesystem, but the code that calls this class, it’s OK 
Figure 3.2 A space shuttle simulator has realistic joysticks and screens to simulate 
the outside world. (Photo courtesy of NASA)
54
CHAPTER 3    Using stubs to break dependencies
Figure 3.3 Introducing a layer 
of indirection to avoid a direct 
dependency on the filesys-
tem. The code that calls the 
filesystem is separated into a  
FileExtensionManager class, 
which will later be replaced 
with a stub in our test.
In figure 3.4, I’ve added a new interface into the mix. This new inter-
face will allow the object model to abstract away the operations of what 
FileExtensionManager
class does, and will allow the test to create a 
stub  that looks  like a 
FileExtensionManager
. You’ll  see  more on this 
method in the next section.
Figure 3.4 Introducing a stub to break the dependency
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested