c# mvc website pdf file in stored in byte array display in browser : Delete pages on pdf file application control tool html web page asp.net online smith_modern_optical_engineering17-part116

length. Thus, the square of the ratio of these two dimensions is a mea-
sure of the relative illumination produced in the image.
The ratio of the focal length to the clear aperture of a lens system is
called the relative aperture, f-number, or “speed” of the system, and
(other factors being equal), the illumination in an image is inverse-
ly proportional to the square  of  this  ratio.  The relative aperture  is 
given by:
f-number = efl/clear aperture
(6.1)
As an example, an 8-in focal length lens with a 1-in clear aperture
has an f-number of 8; this is customarily written f/8 or f:8.
Another  way  of  expressing  this  relationship  is  by  the  numerical
aperture (usually abbreviated as N.A. or NA), which is the index of
refraction (of the medium in which the image lies) times the sine of the
half angle of the cone of illumination.
Numerical aperture = NA = n′ sin U′
(6.2)
Numerical  aperture  and  f-number  are  obviously  two  methods  of
defining the same characteristic of a system. Numerical aperture is
more  conveniently  used  for  systems  that  work  at  finite  conjugates
(such  as  microscope  objectives),  and  the  f-number  is  appropriately
applied to systems for use with distant objects (such as camera lenses
and telescope objectives). For aplanatic systems (i.e., systems correct-
ed for coma and spherical aberration) with infinite object distances,
the two quantities are related by:
f-number
=
(6.3)
The terms “fast” and “slow” are often applied to the f-number of an
optical system to describe its “speed.” Alens with a large aperture (and
thus a small f-number) is said to be “fast,” or to have a high “speed.” A
smaller aperture lens is described as “slow.” This terminology derives
from photographic usage, where a larger aperture allows a shorter (or
faster) exposure time to get the same quantity of energy on the film
and may allow a rapidly moving object to be  photographed without
blurring.
It should be apparent that a system working at finite conjugates will
have  an  object-side  numerical  aperture  as  well  as  an  image-side
numerical  aperture  and  that  the  ratio  NA/NA′ = (object-side
NA)/(image-side NA) must equal the absolute value of the magnifica-
tion. The term “working f-number” is sometimes used to describe the
numerical aperture in f-number terms. If we use the terms “infinity 
f-number” for the f-number defined in Eq. 6.1, then the image-side
1
2NA
152
Chapter Six
Delete pages on pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete blank page in pdf online; delete page from pdf
Delete pages on pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add and delete pages in pdf; delete page on pdf file
working f-number is equal to the  infinity f-number times  (1 - m),
where m is the magnification.
Another  term  that  is  occasionally  encountered  is  the  T-stop, or
T-number. This is analogous to the f-number, except that it takes into
account  the  transmission  of  the  lens.  Since  an  uncoated,  many-
element lens made of exotic glass may transmit only a fraction of the
light that a low-reflection coated lens of simpler construction will trans-
mit, such a speed rating is of considerable value to the photographer.
The relationship between f-number, T-number, and transmission is
T-number =
(6.4)
Cosine-to-the-fourth
For off-axis image points, even when there is no vignetting, the illu-
mination is usually lower than for the image point on the axis. Figure
6.10 is  a  schematic  drawing  showing the  relationship between exit
pupil and image plane for point A on axis and point H off axis. The illu-
mination at an image point is proportional to the solid angle which the
exit pupil subtends from the point.
The solid angle subtended by the pupil from point A is the area of
the exit pupil divided by the square of the distance OA. From point H,
the solid angle is the projected area of the pupil divided by the square
of the distance OH. Since OH is greater than OA by a factor equal to
1/cos θ, this increased distance reduces the illumination by a factor of
cos
2
θ. The exit pupil is viewed obliquely from point H, and its project-
ed area is reduced by a factor which is approximately cos θ. (This is a
fair approximation if OH is large compared to the size of the pupil; for
high-speed lenses used at large obliquities, it may be subject to signif-
icant errors. See Example A in Chap. 8 for an exact expression.)
Thus the illumination at point H is reduced by a factor of cos
3
θ. This
is, however, true for illumination on a plane normal to the line OH
f-number

transm
ission
Stops and Apertures
153
Figure 6.10
Relationship between
exit  pupil  and  image  points,
used  to  demonstrate  that  the
illumination at His cos
4
θtimes
that at A.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Deleting Pages. You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well. Sorting Pages.
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete page from pdf preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page on pdf document; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
(indicated by the dashed line in Fig. 6.10). We want the illumination
in the plane AH. An illumination of x lumens per square foot on the
dashed plane will be reduced on plane AH because the same number
of lumens is spread over a greater area in plane AH. The reduction fac-
tor is cos θ, and combining all the factors we find that
Illumination at H = cos
4
θ(illumination at A)
(6.5)
The importance of this effect on wide-angle lenses can be judged from
the fact that cos
4
30° = 0.56, cos
4
45° = 0.25, and cos
4
60° = 0.06. It
can be seen that the illumination on the film in a wide-angle camera
will fall off quite rapidly.
Note that the preceding has been based on the assumption that the
pupil diameter is constant (with respect to θ) and that θ is the angle
formed in  image  space  (although many  people  apply it  to  the field
angle in object space). The “cosine fourth law” can be modified if the
construction  of  the lens  is  such  that the apparent size of the pupil
increases for off-axis points, or if a sufficiently large amount of barrel
distortion  is  introduced to  hold  θ to smaller values than one would
expect  from  the  corresponding  field  angle  in  object  space.  Certain
extreme  wide-angle  camera  lenses  make  use  of  these  principles  to
increase off-axis illumination. The cos
4
effect is in addition to any illu-
mination  reduction  caused by  vignetting.  It  should be  remembered
that the cosine-fourth effect is not a “law” but a collection of four cosine
factors which may or may not be present in a given situation.
6.8 Depth of Focus
The concept of depth of focus rests on the assumption that for a given
optical system, there exists a blur (due to defocusing) of small enough
size such that it will not adversely affect the performance of the sys-
tem. The depth of focusis the amount by which the image may be shift-
ed  longitudinally  with  respect  to  some  reference  plane  (e.g.,  film,
reticle) and which will introduce no more than the acceptable blur. The
depth of field is the amount by which the object may be shifted before
the acceptable blur is produced. The size of the acceptable blur may be
specified  as  the linear diameter of  the  blur  spot  (as  is  common  in 
photographic applications) (Fig. 6.11) or as an angular blur, i.e., the
angular subtense of the blur spot from the lens. Thus, the linear and
angular blurs (B and
β
, respectively and the distance D are related by
β
=
=
(6.6)
B′
D′
B
D
154
Chapter Six
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Moreover, you may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a PDFDocument object at user-defined position.
delete pages from pdf; cut pages from pdf reader
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
note, PDF file will be divided from the previous page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages.
delete pages from pdf reader; delete page numbers in pdf
for a system in air, where the primed symbols refer to the image-side
quantities.
Angular depth of focus
From Fig. 6.12, it can be seen that the depth of field  for a system with
a clear aperture A can be obtained from the relationship
=
This expression can be solved for the depth of field, giving
=
=
(6.7)
Note that the depth of field toward the optical system is smaller than
that away from the system. When  is small in comparison with the
distance D, this reduces to
=
=
(6.8)
For the image side, the relationship is
′ =
=
=F
β
(f/#) =
B
′(f/#)
(6.9)
where the second, third, and fourth forms of the right-hand side apply
when the image is at the focal point of the system, and F is the system
focal length.
The depth of focus in terms of linear blur-spot size B can be obtained
by substituting Eq. 6.6 into the above. Also, note that the depth of field
and the depth of focus ′ are related by the longitudinal magnifica-
tion of the system, so that
F
2
β
A
D′
2
β
A
D
β
A
D
2
β
A
DB
(A ± B)
D
2
β
(A ± D
β
)
D
A
 
β
(D ± )
Stops and Apertures
155
Figure 6.11
When an optical sys-
tem is defocused, the image of a
point  becomes  a  blurred  spot.
The  size of  the  blur  is  deter-
mined by the relative aperture
of the system and the focus shift.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively will also take up too much space, glyph file unreferenced can Delete unimportant contents
delete blank pages in pdf; delete pages of pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Compress large-size PDF document of 1000+ pages to smaller one in a Delete unimportant contents: C# Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET
acrobat remove pages from pdf; add or remove pages from pdf
′ = m
≈m
2
(6.10)
The hyperfocal distance of a system is the distance at which the sys-
tem must be focused so that the depth of field extends to infinity. If (D
+) equals infinity, then ß is equal to A/D, so that
D(hyperfocal) =
=
(6.11)
The photographic depth of focus
The photographic depth of focus is based on the concept that a defocus
blur which is smaller than a silver grain in the film emulsion will not
be  noticeable.  This  concept  also  can  be  applied  to  pixel size in,  for
example, a charge-coupled device (CCD). If the acceptable blur diame-
ter is B, then the depth of focus (at the image) is simply
′ =
±
B(f-number)
′ =
±
(6.12)
The corresponding depth of field (at the object) is from D
near
to D
far
,
where
D
near
=
(6.13)
D
far
=
(6.14)
and the hyperfocal distance is simply
D
hyp
=
(6.15)
where D = the nominal distance at which the system is focused (note
that, by our sign convention, D is normally negative)
-fA
B
fD (A - B)

(fA + DB)
fD (A + B)

(fA - DB)
B
2NA
F∆
B
A
β
156
Chapter Six
Figure  6.12
Relationships  used
to  determine  the  longitudinal
depth of field in terms of a toler-
able angular blur.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF File by Number of Pages Demo Code in VB.NET. This is an VB.NET example of splitting a PDF file into multiple ones by number of pages.
delete pages in pdf reader; delete page from pdf acrobat
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Professional C#.NET PDF SDK for merging PDF file merging in Visual Studio .NET. Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET
cut pages from pdf online; delete pages on pdf online
A= the diameter of the entrance pupil of the lens
f= the focal length of the lens
Note that there are several false assumptions here. We assume that
the image is a perfect point, with no diffraction effects. We also assume
that the lens has no aberrations and that the blurring on both sides of
the focus is the same. None of these assumptions is correct, but the
equations above do give a usable model for the depth of focus. In prac-
tice, the acceptable blur diameter B is usually determined empirically
by examining a series of defocused images to decide the level of accept-
ability; the equations above are then fitted to the results.
6.9 Diffraction Effects of Apertures
Even if we assume that an infinitely small point source of light is pos-
sible, no lens system can form a true point image, even though the lens
be perfectly made and absolutely free of aberrations. This results from
the  fact  that  light  does  not  really  travel  in  straight-line  rays,  but
behaves as a wave motion, bending around corners and obstructions to
a small but finite degree.
According  to  Huygen’s  principle  of  light-wave  propagation,  each
point  on  a  wave  front  may  be  considered  as  a  source  of  spherical
wavelets; these wavelets reinforce or interfere with each other to form
the new wave front. When the original wave front is infinite in extent,
the new wave front is simply the envelope of the wavelets in the direc-
tion of propagation. At the other extreme, when the wave front is lim-
ited by an aperture to  a very small size (say, to the order of a half
wavelength), the new wave front becomes spherical about the aper-
ture. Figure 6.13 shows a plane wavefront incident on a slit AC, which
is in front of a perfect lens. The lens is focused on a screen, EF. We
wish to determine the nature of the illumination on the screen. Since
the lens of Fig. 6.13 is assumed perfect, the optical path lengths AE,
BE, and CE are all equal and the waves will arrive in phase at E, rein-
forcing each other to produce a bright area. For  Huygen’s wavelets
Stops and Apertures
157
Figure 6.13
starting from the plane wave front in a direction indicated by angle α,
the paths are different; path AF differs from path CF by the distance
CD. If CD is an integral number of wavelengths, the wavelets from A
and C will reinforce at point F. If CD is an odd number of half wave-
lengths, a cancellation will occur. The illumination at F will be the
summation of the contributions from each incremental segment of the
slit,  taking  the  phase  relationships  into  account.  It  can  be  readily
demonstrated that when CD is an integral number of wavelengths, the
illumination at F is zero, as follows: if CD is one wavelength, then BG
is  one-half  wavelength  and  the  wavelets  from  A and B cancel.
Similarly, the wavelets from the points just below A and B cancel and
so on down the width of the slit. If CD is N wavelengths, we divide the
slit into 2N parts (instead of two parts) and apply the same reasoning.
Thus, there is a dark zone at F when
sin α =
where N = any integer
= the wavelength of the light
w= the width of the slit
Thus, the illumination in the plane EF is a series of light and dark
bands. The central bright band is the most intense, and the bands on
either  side  are  successively  less  intense.  One  can  realize  that  the
intensity  should diminish  by  considering  the situation  when CD is
1.5, 2.5, etc. When CD is 1.5, the wavelets from two-thirds of the
slit can be shown (as in the preceding paragraph) to interfere and can-
cel out, leaving the wavelets from one-third of the aperture; when CD
is 2.5, only one-fifth of the slit is uncanceled. Since the “uncanceled”
wavelets are neither exactly in nor exactly out of phase, the illumina-
tion at the corresponding points on the screen will be less than one-
third or one-fifth of that in the central band.
For a more rigorous mathematical development of the subject, the
reader is referred to the references following this chapter. The mathe-
matical approach is one of integration  over  the aperture, combined
with a suitable technique for the addition of the wavelets which are
neither  exactly  in  nor  exactly  out  of  phase.  This  approach  can  be
applied to rectangular and circular apertures as well as to slits.
For  a  rectangular  aperture,  the  illumination  on  the  screen  is 
given by
I= I
0
̇
(6.16)
m
i
=
i= 1,2
(6.17)
πw
i
sin
α
i

sin
2
m
2
m
2
2
sin
2
m
1
m
1
2
±N
w
158
Chapter Six
In these expressions  is the wavelength, w the width of the exit aper-
ture, α the angle subtended by the point on the screen, m
1
and m
2
cor-
respond to the two principal dimensions, w
1
and w
2
, of the rectangular
aperture and I
0
is the illumination at the center of the pattern.
When the aperture is circular, the illumination is given by
I
=
I
0
1
-
 
2
+
 
2
-
 
2
+
 
2
-
...
2
(6.18)
=I
0
2
where mis given by Eq. 6.17 with the obvious substitution of the diam-
eter of the circular exit aperture for the width, w, and J
1
( ) is the first-
order Bessel function. The illumination pattern consists of a bright
central spot of light surrounded by concentric rings of rapidly decreas-
ing  intensity.  The  bright  central  spot  of  this  pattern  is  called  the 
Airy disk.
We can convert from angle α to Z, the radial distance from the cen-
ter of the pattern, by reference to Fig. 6.14. If the optical system is rea-
sonably aberration-free, then
l′ =
and to a close approximation, when α is small
Z=
=
(6.19)
The table of Fig. 6.15 lists the characteristics of the diffraction pat-
terns for circular and slit apertures. The table is derived from Eqs.
6.16 and 6.18, but the data is given in terms of Z and sin U′ rather
than α and w. Note that n′ sin U′ is the numerical aperture NA of the
optical system.
Notice that 84 percent of the energy in the pattern is contained in
the central spot, and that the illumination in the central spot is almost
60 times that in the first bright ring. Ordinarily the central spot and
-αw

2n′ sin U′
l′α
n′
-w
2 sin U′
2J
1
(m)
m
m
4
2
4
4!
1
5
m
3
2
3
3!
1
4
m
2
2
2
2!
1
3
m
2
1
2
Stops and Apertures
159
Figure 6.14
the first two bright rings dominate the appearance of the pattern, the
other rings being too faint to notice. The illumination in a diffraction
pattern is plotted in Fig. 6.16. One should bear in mind the fact that
these  energy  distributions apply to perfect,  aberration-free  systems
with circular or slit apertures which are uniformly transmitting and
which are illuminated by wave fronts of uniform amplitude. The pres-
ence of aberrations will, of course, modify the distribution as will any
nonuniformity of transmission or wave-front amplitude (see, for exam-
ple, Sec. 6.11).
6.10 Resolution of Optical Systems
The diffraction pattern resulting from the finite aperture of an optical
system establishes a limit to the performance which  we can expect
from even the best optical device. Consider an optical system which
images two equally bright point sources of light. Each point is imaged
as an Airy disk with the encircling rings, and if the points are close,
the diffraction patterns will overlap. When the separation is such that
it is just possible to determine that there are two points and not one,
the points are said to be resolved. Figure 6.17 indicates the summation
of  the  two  diffraction  patterns  for  various  amounts  of  separation.
When the image points are closer than 0.5/NA (NA is the numerical
aperture of the system and equals n′ sin U′), the central maxima of
both patterns blend into one and the combined patterns may appear to
be due to a single source. At a separation of 0.5/NA the duplicity of
the image points is detectable, although there is no minimum between
the maxima from the two patterns. This is Sparrow’s criterion for res-
olution. When the image separation reaches 0.61/NA, the maximum
160
Chapter Six
Figure 6.15
Tabulation of the size of and distribution of energy in the diffraction pattern
at the focus of a perfect lens.
of one pattern coincides with the first dark ring of the other and there
is a clear indication of two separate maxima in the combined pattern.
This is Lord Rayleigh’s criterion for resolution and is the most widely
used value for the limiting resolution of an optical system.*
From the tabulation of Fig. 6.15, we find that the distance from the
center of the Airy disk to the first dark ring is given by
Z=
=
=1.22 (f/#)
(6.20)
This  is  the  separation  of  two  image  points  corresponding  to  the
Rayleigh criterion for  resolution. This  expression  is widely  used  in
determining the limiting resolution for microscopes and the like. For
resolution at the image, the NA of the image cone is used; for resolu-
tion at the object, the NA of the object cone is used.
0.61
NA
0.61

n′ sin U′
Stops and Apertures
161
Figure 6.16
The distribution of illumination in the Airy
disk. The appearance of the Airy disk is shown in the
upper right.
*The diffraction pattern of two point images will always differ somewhat from the dif-
fraction pattern of a single point. It is thus possible to detect the presence of two points
(as opposed to one) even in cases where the two points cannot be visually resolved or sep-
arated. This is the source of the occasional claims that a system “exceeds the theoreti-
cal limit of resolution.” In Chap. 11 it is shown that there is a true limit on the resolution
of a sinusoidal line target; the limit on the spatial frequency is v
0
=2NA/= 1/(f/#).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested