c# mvc website pdf file in stored in byte array display in browser : Delete page on pdf file Library software class asp.net wpf .net ajax smith_modern_optical_engineering18-part117

To evaluate the performance limits of telescopes and other systems
working at long object distances, an expression for the angular sepa-
ration of the object points is more useful. Rearranging Eq. 6.19 and
substituting the limiting value of Z from Eq. 6.20, we get, in radian
measure,
α=
radians
(6.21)
For ordinary visual instruments,  may be taken as 0.55 μm, and
using 4.85 ̇ 10
-6
radians for 1 second of arc, we find that
α=
seconds of arc
(6.22)
when w is the aperture diameter expressed in inches. By a series of
careful observations, the astronomer Dawes found that two stars of
equal brightness could be visually resolved when their separation was
4.6/w seconds. Notice that if the Sparrow criterion is used instead of
the  Rayleigh  criterion  in  Eq.  6.22,  the  limiting  resolution  angle  is
4.5/w seconds, which is in close agreement with Dawes’ findings.
It is worth emphasizing here that the angular resolution limit is a
direct function of wavelength and an inverse function of the aperture
of the system. Thus, the limiting resolution is improved by reducing
5.5
w
1.22
w
162
Chapter Six
Figure 6.17
The dashed lines represent the diffraction
patterns of two point images at various separations. The
solid line indicates the combined diffraction pattern. Case
(b) is the Sparrow criterion for resolution. Case (c) is the
Rayleigh criterion.
Delete page on pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages on pdf file; delete pages pdf file
Delete page on pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page on pdf document; acrobat remove pages from pdf
the wavelength or by increasing the aperture. Note that focal length or
working distance do not directly affect the angular resolution. The lin-
ear resolution is governed by the wavelength and the numerical aper-
ture (NA or f-number), and not by the aperture diameter.
In an instrument such as a spectroscope, where it is desired to sep-
arate one wavelength from another, the measure of resolution is the
smallest wavelength difference, d, which can be resolved. This is usu-
ally expressed as /d; thus, a resolution of 10,000 would indicate that
the smallest detectable difference in wavelength was 1/10,000 of the
wavelength upon which the instrument was set.
For a prism spectroscope, the prism is frequently the limiting aper-
ture, and it can be shown that when the prism is used at minimum
deviation, the resolution is given by
=B
(6.23)
where B is the length of the base of the prism and dn/d is the dis-
persion of the prism material.
Adiffraction grating consists of a series of precisely ruled lines on a
clear (or reflecting) base. Light can pass directly through a grating, but
it is also diffracted. As with the slit aperture discussed above, at certain
angles the diffracted wavelets reinforce, and maxima are produced when
sin α =
±sin I
(6.24)
where  is the wavelength, I is the angle of incidence, S is the spacing
of the grating lines, m is an integer, called the order of the maxima,
and the positive sign is used for a transmission grating, the negative
for a reflecting. (Note that a sinusoidal grating has only a first order.)
Since α depends on the wavelength , such a device can be used to sep-
arate the diffracted light into its component wavelengths. When used
as indicated in Fig. 6.18, the resolution of a grating is given by
=mN
(6.25)
where m is the order and N is the total number of lines in the grating
(assuming the size of the grating to be the limiting aperture of the 
system).
6.11 Diffraction of a Gaussian (Laser) Beam
The illumination distribution in the image of a point as described in
Secs. 6.9 and 6.10 was based on the assumptions that the optical sys-
tem was perfect and that both the transmission and the wave-front
d
m
S
dn
d
d
Stops and Apertures
163
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages in pdf online; delete pages from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
delete page from pdf preview; delete blank pages in pdf files
amplitude were uniform over the aperture. Any change in the intensi-
ty distribution in the beam will change the diffraction pattern from
that described above. Obviously, a similar change in the transmission
of the aperture will produce the same effects.
A“gaussian beam” is one whose intensity cross section follows the
equation of a gaussian, y = e
-x
2
. Laser output beams closely approxi-
mate gaussian beams. From mathematics we know that exponential
functions, such as the gaussian are extremely resistant to transforma-
tions  (consider,  for  example,  the  integral  or  differential  of  e
-x
).
Similarly, a gaussian beam tends to remain a gaussian beam, as long
as it is “handled” by reasonably aberration-free optics, and the diffrac-
tion image of a point also has a gaussian distribution of illumination.
The  distribution of intensity in a gaussian beam is illustrated  in 
Fig. 6.19 and can be described by Eq. 6.26.
I(r) = I
o
e
-2r
2
/w
2
(6.26)
where I (r) = the beam intensity at a distance r from the beam axis
I
0
=the intensity on axis
r= the radial distance
e= 2.718.…
w= the radial distance at which the intensity falls to I
0
/e
2
, i.e.,
to  13.5  percent  of  its  central  value.  This  is  usually
referred  to  as  the  beam  width,  although  it  is  a  semi-
diameter. It encompasses 86.5 percent of the beam power.
164
Chapter Six
Figure 6.18
(Upper) Prism spectrometer. (Lower) Grating
spectrometer.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete pages in pdf reader; delete page pdf acrobat reader
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
delete pages from a pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
Beam power
By integration of Eq. 6.26 we find the total power in the beam to be
given by
P
tot
1
/
2
πI
0
w
2
(6.27)
The power passed through a centered circular aperture of radius a is
given by
P(a) = P
tot
(1 - e
-2a
2
/w
2
)
(6.28)
The power passed by a centered slit of width 2s is given by
P(s) = P
tot
̇erf
(6.29)
where erf (u) =
u
0
e
-t
2
dt = the error function, which is tabulated in
mathematical handbooks.
Diffraction spreading of a gaussian beam
Agaussian beam has a narrowest width at some point, which is called
the “waist.” This point may be near where the beam is focused or near
where it emerges from the laser. As the beam progresses, it spreads
out according to the following equation:
w
z
2
=w
0
2
1+
 
2
(6.30)
where w
z
=the semidiameter of the beam (i.e., to the 1/e
2
points) at a
longitudinal distance z from the beam waist.
w
0
=the semidiameter of the beam (to the 1/e
2
points) at the
beam waist.
= the wavelength
z
πw
0
2
s
2
w
Stops and Apertures
165
Figure 6.19
Gaussian beam intensity profile.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
cut pages from pdf online; cut pages from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
cut pages from pdf; delete pages from a pdf reader
z= the  distance  along the  beam axis  from the  waist  to  the
plane of w
z
At large distances it is convenient to know the angular beam spread.
Dividing both sides of Eq. 6.30 by z
2
, then, as z approaches infinity, 
we get
=
=
=
or
α
=
=
(6.31)
z→∞
where α is the angular beam spread in radians between the 1/e
2
points. For many applications, the gaussian diffraction blur at the
image plane can be found by simply multiplying α from Eq. 6.31 by
the image conjugate distance (s′ from Chap. 2).
Beam truncation
The effect of beam truncation, i.e., stopping down or cutting off the
outer regions of the beam, is discussed by Campbell and DeShazer.
They show that if the diameter of the beam is not reduced below 2(2w),
where w is the beam semidiameter at the 1/e
2
points, then the beam
intensity distribution remains within a few percent of a true gaussian
distribution. If the clear aperture is reduced below this value, it will
introduce structure (i.e., rings) into the irradiance patterns, and the
pattern gradually approaches Eq. 6.18 as the aperture is reduced.
Alens aperture large enough to pass a beam with a diameter of 4w
is obviously very inefficient from a radiation transfer standpoint. For
this reason, most systems truncate the beam, very often to the 1/e
2
diameter,  and  the  diffraction  pattern  is  altered  accordingly.  If  the
beam is truncated down to 61 percent of the 1/e
2
diameter, it is diffi-
cult to see the difference from a uniform beam.
Size and location of a new waist formed by a
perfect optical system
When a gaussian beam passes through an optical system, a new waist
is formed. Its size and location are determined by diffraction (and not
by the paraxial equations of Chap. 2). The waist and focus are at dif-
ferent locations; in a weakly convergent beam, the separation may be
large. The following equations allow calculation of the new waist size
and location:
x′ =
(6.32)
-xf
2

x
2
+
πw
1
2
2
1.27

diameter
4
π(2w
0
)
2
π(2w
0
)
πw
0
w
z
z
α
2
166
Chapter Six
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete pages of pdf online; delete page numbers in pdf
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document file, and choose to create a new PDF file in .NET NET document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
delete page from pdf; add and remove pages from pdf file online
w
2
2
=
=w
1
2
 
(6.33)
where w
1
=the radius (to the 1/e
2
points) of the original waist
w
2
=the radius of the new waist formed by the optical system
f= the focal length of the lens
x= the distance from the first focal point of the lens to the
plane of w
1
x′ = the distance from the second focal point of the lens to the
plane of w
2
Note that x and x′ are usually negative and positive, respectively. Note
also the similarity to the newtonian paraxial equation (Eq. 2.3).
Two points regarding the above are well worth emphasizing. First,
laser researchers speak in terms of a “beam waist.” Note that in the
equations  above  and  in  common  usage  it  is  described  as  a  radial
dimension, not a diameter; the diameter of the waist is 2w. Second, the
waist and the focus are not the same thing, as a comparison of Eqs.
6.32 and 2.3 will indicate. In most circumstances the difference is triv-
ial and gaussian beams may be handled by the usual paraxial equa-
tions. But when the beam convergence is small (i.e., with an f-number
of a hundred or so), it is possible to distinguish both a focus and a sep-
arate  beam  waist.  For  example,  if  we  project  a  1-in  laser  beam
(through a focusable beam expander) on a screen about 50 ft away, we
can focus the beam to get the smallest possible spot on the screen. The
focus is now at the screen. However, there is a location a few feet short
of  the screen at which  a  smaller  beam  diameter exists.  This is  the
beam waist; it can be demonstrated by moving the screen (or a sheet
of paper) toward the laser and observing the reduction of the spot size.
Note that with the screen now at this beam waist position, the beam
expander can be refocused to get a still smaller spot on the screen.
Then there will be a new waist still closer to the laser, etc., etc., etc.
Note well that the focus is  the smallest  spot  which can  be pro-
duced on a surface at a given, fixed distance. The waist is the small-
est diameter in the beam (see Gaskill, p. 435).
Note also that all the phenomena described in this  section  result
from the gaussian distribution of beam intensity and not from the fact
that the source may be a laser. The same effects could be produced by
a radially graded filter placed over the aperture of the system. (The
temporal and spatial coherence of a laser beam are, of course, what
make it practical to demonstrate these effects.)
x′
-x
f
2
w
1
2

x
2
+
πw
1
2
2
Stops and Apertures
167
6.12 The Fourier Transform Lens and
Spatial Filtering
In Fig. 6.20 we have a transparent object located at the first focal
point of lens A. As indicated by the dashed rays in the figure, lens A
images the object at infinity so that the rays originating at the axial
point of the object are collimated. These rays are brought to a focus
at the second focal plane of lens B, where the image of the object is
located.
Now let  us  realize  that  Fourier  theory  allows us  to consider  the
object as comprised of a collection of sinusoidal gratings of different
frequencies, amplitudes, phases, and  orientations.  If our object  is a
simple linear grating with but a single spatial frequency, it will devi-
ate the light through an angle α according to Eq. 6.24, except that a
sinusoidal grating has but a single diffraction order, the first. Now, if
the object is illuminated by collimated/coherent light, that diffracted
light will be focused as two points in the second focal plane of lens A
(which is indicated as the Fourier plane, midway between the lenses
in Fig. 6.20). The points will be laterally displaced by  = f tan α from
the nominal focus. Thus, if an annular zone in the Fourier plane is
obstructed, all the spatial information of the frequency corresponding
to the radius of the obstruction will be removed (filtered) from the final
image. Thus it can be seen that the Fourier plane constitutes a sort of
map of the spatial frequency content of the object and that this content
can be analyzed or modified in this plane.
Bibliography
Note: Titles preceded by an asterisk are out of print.
Campbell, J., and  L. DeShazer, J. Opt. Soc. Am., vol. 59,  1969,  pp.
1427–1429.
Gaskill, J., Linear Systems, Fourier Transforms, and Optics, New York,
Wiley, 1978.
168
Chapter Six
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ILLUMINATION
COHERENT
COLLIMATED/
OBJECT
LENS A
FOURIER
PLANE
LENS B
IMAGE
Figure 6.20
Goodman, J., Introduction to Fourier Optics, New York, McGraw-Hill,
1968.
*Hardy,  A.,  and  F.  Perrin,  The  Principles  of  Optics, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1932.
*Jacobs,  D.,  Fundamentals  of  Optical  Engineering, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1943.
Jenkins,  F.,  and  H.  White,  Fundamentals  of  Optics, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1976.
Kogelnick,  H.,  in  Shannon  and  Wyant  (eds.),  Applied  Optics  and
Optical Engineering, vol. 7, New York, Academic, 1979.
Kogelnick, H., and T. Li, Applied Optics, 1966, pp. 1550–1567.
Pompea,  S.  M.,  and  R.  P.  Breault,  “Black  Surfaces  for  Optical
Systems,” in Handbook of Optics, vol. 2, New York, McGraw-Hill,
1995, Chap. 37.
Silfvast,  W.  T.,  “Lasers,”  in  Handbook  of  Optics, vol.  1,  New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 11.
Smith,  W.,  in  W.  Driscoll  (ed.),  Handbook  of  Optics, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1978.
Smith, W., in Wolfe and Zissis (eds.), The Infrared Handbook, Office of
Naval Research, 1985.
Stoltzman,  D.,  in  Shannon  and  Wyant  (eds.),  Applied  Optics  and
Optical Design, vol. 9, New York, Academic, 1983.
*Strong, J., Concepts of Classical Optics, New York, Freeman, 1958.
Walther,  A.,  in  Kingslake  (ed.),  Applied  Optics  and  Optical
Engineering, vol. 1, New York, Academic, 1965.
Exercises
1 Find the positions and diameters of the entrance and exit pupils of a 100-
mm focal length lens with a diaphragm 20 mm to the right of the lens, if the
lens diameter is 15 mm and the diaphragm diameter is 10 mm.
ANSWER
: Entrance pupil is 25 mm to the right and 12.5 mm in diameter. Exit
pupil is 20 mm to the right and 10 mm in diameter.
2 What is the relative aperture (f-number) of the lens of exercise #1 with
light incident (a) from the left, and (b) from the right?
ANSWER
: (a) f/8 (b) f/10
3 A telescope is composed of an objective lens, f= 10 in, diameter = 1 in and
an eyelens, f =1 in, dia. =1
2
in, which are 11 in apart. (a) Locate the entrance
and exit pupils and find their diameters. (b) Determine the object and image
fields of view in radians. Assume object and image to be at infinity.
ANSWER
: (a) Entrance pupil is at the objective, diameter 1 in. Exit pupil is 1.1
in to the right of the eyelens and is 0.1 in diameter. (b) For zero vignetting,
Stops and Apertures
169
object field is ±0.01818 and image field is ±0.1818. For complete vignetting,
object field is ±0.02727 and image field is ±0.2727.
4 A 4-in focal length f/4 lens is used to project an image at a magnification
of four times (m = -4). What is the numerical aperture in object space and in
image space?
ANSWER
: NA = 0.1; NA = 0.025
5 An optical system composed of two thin elements forms an image of an
object located at infinity. The front lens has a 16-in focal length, the rear lens
an 8-in focal length, and the spacing between the two is 8 in. If the exit pupil
is located at the rear lens and there is no vignetting, what is the illumination
at an image point 3 in from the axis relative to the illumination on the axis?
ANSWER
: 41 percent
6 A 6-in diameter f/5 paraboloid mirror is part of an infrared tracker which
can tolerate a blur (due to defocusing) of 0.1 milliradians. (a) What tolerance
must be maintained on the position of the reticle with respect to the focal
point? (b) What is the tolerance if the system speed is f/2?
ANSWER
: (a) ±0.015 in (b) ±0.0024 in
7 If the hyperfocal distance of a 10-in focal length, f/10 lens is 100 in, (a)
what is the diameter of the acceptable blur spot, and (b) what is the closest
distance at which an object is “acceptably” in focus? (c) Show that the answer
to (b) is always one-half the hyperfocal distance.
ANSWER
: (a) 0.111 in (b) 50 in
8 Compare the image illumination produced by an f/8 lens at a point 45°
from the axis with that from an f/16 lens 30° off axis.
ANSWER
: The f/16 is 56 percent of the f/8
9 Plot the illumination (in the manner of Fig. 6.16) in the diffraction pat-
tern at the focus of a lens with a square aperture, (a) along a line through the
axis at 90° to a side of the aperture, and (b) along a line at 45° (the diagonal)
to the sides of the aperture.
10 An optical system is required to image a distant point source as a spot of
0.01 mm in diameter. Assuming that all the useful energy in the image spot
will be within the first dark ring, what relative aperture (f-number) must the
optical system have? Assume a wavelength of 0.00055 mm.
ANSWER
: f/7.5
11 A pinhole camera has no lens but uses a very small hole some distance
from the film to form its image. If we assume that light travels in straight
170
Chapter Six
lines, then the image of a distant point source will be a blur whose diameter
is the same size as the pinhole. However, diffraction will spread the light into
an Airy disk. Thus, the larger the hole, the larger the geometrical blur but the
smaller the diffraction pattern. Assume that the sharpest picture will be pro-
duced when the geometrical blur is the same size as the central bright spot of
the Airy disk. What size hole should be used when the film is 10 cm from the
hole? (Hint: Equate the hole diameter to the diameter of the first dark ring of
the Airy disk given by Eq. 6.20.)
ANSWER
: 0.037 cm for  = 0.55 μm (diameter =
2.44
f
)
12 What is the resolution limit (at the object) for a microscopic objective
whose acceptance cone has a numerical aperture of (a) 0.25, (b) 0.8, (c) 1.2?
ANSWER
: (a) 0.0013 mm, (b) 0.00042 nn, (c) 0.00028 mm
13 What  diameter  must  a  telescope  objective  have if the  telescope  is to
resolve 11 seconds of arc? If the eye can resolve 1 minute of arc, what is the
minimum power of the telescope?
ANSWER
: 0.5 in; 5.5 ×
14 Compare the resolution of a prism and a grating. The prism has a
1-in base and  its glass has  a  dispersion of 0.1 per micrometer. The
grating is 1-in wide and is ruled with 15,000 lines per inch.
ANSWER
: Prism  resolution—2540;  grating  resolution—15,000  1st  order,
30,000 2d order, etc.
Stops and Apertures
171
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested