c# mvc website pdf file in stored in byte array display in browser : Delete a page from a pdf Library software component .net winforms web page mvc The+Lion,+The+Witch+and+The+Wardrobe+by+C.S.+Lewis4-part1153

That was what the others chiefly noticed, but Edmund noticed something else. A little lower down 
the river there was another small river which came down another small valley to join it. And looking 
up that valley, Edmund could see two small hills, and he was almost sure they were the two hills 
which the White Witch had pointed out to him when he parted from her at the lamp-post that other 
day. And then between them, he thought, must be her palace, only a mile off or less. And he thought 
about Turkish Delight and about being a King ("And I wonder how Peter will like that?" he asked 
himself) and horrible ideas came into his head. 
"Here we are," said Mr Beaver, "and it looks as if Mrs Beaver is expecting us. I'll lead the way. But 
be careful and don't slip." 
The top of the dam was wide enough to walk on, though not (for humans) a very nice place to walk 
because it was covered with ice, and though the frozen pool was level with it on one side, there was a 
nasty drop to the lower river on the other. Along this route Mr Beaver led them in single file right out 
to the middle where they could look a long way up the river and a long way down it. And when they 
had reached the middle they were at the door of the house. 
"Here we are, Mrs Beaver," said Mr Beaver, "I've found them. Here are the Sons and Daughters of 
Adam and Eve'- and they all went in. 
The first thing Lucy noticed as she went in was a burring sound, and the first thing she saw was a 
kindlooking old she-beaver sitting in the corner with a thread in her mouth working busily at her 
sewing machine, and it was from it that the sound came. She stopped her work and got up as soon as 
the children came in. 
"So you've come at last!" she said, holding out both her wrinkled old paws. "At last! To think that 
ever I should live to see this day! The potatoes are on boiling and the kettle's singing and I daresay, 
Mr Beaver, you'll get us some fish." 
"That I will," said Mr Beaver, and he went out of the house (Peter went with him), and across the ice 
of the deep pool to where he had a little hole in the ice which he kept open every day with his hatchet. 
They took a pail with them. Mr Beaver sat down quietly at the edge of the hole (he didn't seem to 
mind it being so chilly), looked hard into it, then suddenly shot in his paw, and before you could say 
Jack Robinson had whisked out a beautiful trout. Then he did it all over again until they had a fine 
catch of fish. 
Delete a page from a pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete blank pages in pdf; delete pages from a pdf online
Delete a page from a pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf file; delete page in pdf document
Meanwhile the girls were helping Mrs Beaver to fill the kettle and lay the table and cut the bread 
and put the plates in the oven to heat and draw a huge jug of beer for Mr Beaver from a barrel which 
stood in one corner of the house, and to put on the frying-pan and get the dripping hot. Lucy thought 
the Beavers had a very snug little home though it was not at all like Mr Tumnus's cave. There were 
no books or pictures, and instead of beds there were bunks, like on board ship, built into the wall. 
And there were hams and strings of onions hanging from the roof, and against the walls were gum 
boots and oilskins and hatchets and pairs of shears and spades and trowels and things for carrying 
mortar in and fishing-rods and fishing-nets and sacks. And the cloth on the table, though very clean, 
was very rough. 
Just as the frying-pan was nicely hissing Peter and Mr Beaver came in with the fish which Mr 
Beaver had already opened with his knife and cleaned out in the open air. You can think how good 
the new-caught fish smelled while they were frying and how the hungry children longed for them to 
be done and how very much hungrier still they had become before Mr Beaver said, "Now we're 
nearly ready." Susan drained the potatoes and then put them all back in the empty pot to dry on the 
side of the range while Lucy was helping Mrs Beaver to dish up the trout, so that in a very few 
minutes everyone was drawing up their stools (it was all three-legged stools in the Beavers' house 
except for Mrs Beaver's own special rockingchair beside the fire) and preparing to enjoy themselves. 
There was a jug of creamy milk for the children (Mr Beaver stuck to beer) and a great big lump of 
deep yellow butter in the middle of the table from which everyone took as much as he wanted to go 
with his potatoes, and all the children thought - and I agree with them - that there's nothing to beat 
good freshwater fish if you eat it when it has been alive half an hour ago and has come out of the pan 
half a minute ago. And when they had finished the fish Mrs Beaver brought unexpectedly out of the 
oven a great and gloriously sticky marmalade roll, steaming hot, and at the same time moved the 
kettle on to the fire, so that when they had finished the marmalade roll the tea was made and ready to 
be poured out. And when each person had got his (or her) cup of tea, each person shoved back his (or 
her) stool so as to be able to lean against the wall and gave a long sigh of contentment. 
"And now," said Mr Beaver, pushing away his empty beer mug and pulling his cup of tea towards 
him, "if you'll just wait till I've got my pipe lit up and going nicely - why, now we can get to business. 
It's snowing again," he added, cocking his eye at the window. "That's all the better, because it means 
we shan't have any visitors; and if anyone should have been trying to follow you, why he won't find 
any tracks." 
CHAPTER EIGHT - WHAT HAPPENED AFTER DINNER 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pdf pages android; delete page in pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete pages from a pdf file; delete pages in pdf
"AND now," said Lucy, "do please tell us what's happened to Mr Tumnus." 
"Ah, that's bad," said Mr Beaver, shaking his head. "That's a very, very bad business. There's no 
doubt he was taken off by the police. I got that from a bird who saw it done." 
"But where's he been taken to?" asked Lucy. 
"Well, they were heading northwards when they were last seen and we all know what that means." 
"No, we don't," said Susan. Mr Beaver shook his head in a very gloomy fashion. 
"I'm afraid it means they were taking him to her House," he said. 
"But what'll they do to him, Mr Beaver?" gasped Lucy. 
"Well," said Mr Beaver, "you can't exactly say for sure. But there's not many taken in there that ever 
comes out again. Statues. All full of statues they say it is - in the courtyard and up the stairs and in the 
hall. People she's turned" - (he paused and shuddered) "turned into stone." 
"But, Mr Beaver," said Lucy, "can't we - I mean we must do something to save him. It's too dreadful 
and it's all on my account." 
"I don't doubt you'd save him if you could, dearie," said Mrs Beaver, "but you've no chance of 
getting into that House against her will and ever coming out alive." 
"Couldn't we have some stratagem?" said Peter. "I mean couldn't we dress up as something, or 
pretend to be - oh, pedlars or anything - or watch till she was gone out - or- oh, hang it all, there must 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete pdf pages in preview; delete pages out of a pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete page in pdf file; best pdf editor delete pages
be some way. This Faun saved my sister at his own risk, Mr Beaver. We can't just leave him to be - to 
be - to have that done to him." 
"It's no good, Son of Adam," said Mr Beaver, "no good your trying, of all people. But now that 
Aslan is on the move-" 
"Oh, yes! Tell us about Aslan!" said several voices at once; for once again that strange feeling - like 
the first signs of spring, like good news, had come over them. 
"Who is Aslan?" asked Susan. 
"Aslan?" said Mr Beaver. "Why, don't you know? He's the King. He's the Lord of the whole wood, 
but not often here, you understand. Never in my time or my father's time. But the word has reached 
us that he has come back. He is in Narnia at this moment. He'll settle the White Queen all right. It is 
he, not you, that will save Mr Tumnus." 
"She won't turn him into stone too?" said Edmund. 
"Lord love you, Son of Adam, what a simple thing to say!" answered Mr Beaver with a great laugh. 
"Turn him into stone? If she can stand on her two feet and look him in the face it'll be the most she 
can do and more than I expect of her. No, no. He'll put all to rights as it says in an old rhyme in these 
parts: 
Wrong will be right, when Aslan comes in sight, 
At the sound of his roar, sorrows will be no more, 
When he bares his teeth, winter meets its death, 
And when he shakes his mane, we shall have spring again. 
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete page pdf acrobat reader
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
cut pages out of pdf file; delete pages from a pdf
You'll understand when you see him." 
"But shall we see him?" asked Susan. 
"Why, Daughter of Eve, that's what I brought you here for. I'm to lead you where you shall meet 
him," said Mr Beaver. 
"Is-is he a man?" asked Lucy. 
"Aslan a man!" said Mr Beaver sternly. "Certainly not. I tell you he is the King of the wood and the 
son of the great Emperor-beyond-the-Sea. Don't you know who is the King of Beasts? Aslan is a lion 
- the Lion, the great Lion." 
"Ooh!" said Susan, "I'd thought he was a man. Is he - quite safe? I shall feel rather nervous about 
meeting a lion." 
"That you will, dearie, and no mistake," said Mrs Beaver; "if there's anyone who can appear before 
Aslan without their knees knocking, they're either braver than most or else just silly." 
"Then he isn't safe?" said Lucy. 
"Safe?" said Mr Beaver; "don't you hear what Mrs Beaver tells you? Who said anything about safe? 
'Course he isn't safe. But he's good. He's the King, I tell you." 
"I'm longing to see him," said Peter, "even if I do feel frightened when it comes to the point." 
"That's right, Son of Adam," said Mr Beaver, bringing his paw down on the table with a crash that 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document. If you find certain page in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page directly. Moreover, when
delete pages on pdf file; delete pages from a pdf document
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete page from pdf reader
made all the cups and saucers rattle. "And so you shall. Word has been sent that you are to meet him, 
tomorrow if you can, at the Stone Table.’ 
"Where's that?" said Lucy. 
"I'll show you," said Mr Beaver. "It's down the river, a good step from here. I'll take you to it!" 
"But meanwhile what about poor Mr Tumnus?" said Lucy. 
"The quickest way you can help him is by going to meet Aslan," said Mr Beaver, "once he's with us, 
then we can begin doing things. Not that we don't need you too. For that's another of the old rhymes: 
When Adam's flesh and Adam's bone 
Sits at Cair Paravel in throne, 
The evil time will be over and done. 
So things must be drawing near their end now he's come and you've come. We've heard of Aslan 
coming into these parts before - long ago, nobody can say when. But there's never been any of your 
race here before." 
"That's what I don't understand, Mr Beaver," said Peter, "I mean isn't the Witch herself human?" 
"She'd like us to believe it," said Mr Beaver, "and it's on that that she bases her claim to be Queen. 
But she's no Daughter of Eve. She comes of your father Adam's" - (here Mr Beaver bowed) "your 
father Adam's first wife, her they called Lilith. And she was one of the Jinn. That's what she comes 
from on one side. And on the other she comes of the giants. No, no, there isn't a drop of real human 
blood in the Witch." 
"That's why she's bad all through, Mr Beaver," said Mrs Beaver. 
"True enough, Mrs Beaver," replied he, "there may be two views about humans (meaning no 
offence to the present company). But there's no two views about things that look like humans and 
aren't." 
"I've known good Dwarfs," said Mrs Beaver. 
"So've I, now you come to speak of it," said her husband, "but precious few, and they were the ones 
least like men. But in general, take my advice, when you meet anything that's going to be human and 
isn't yet, or used to be human once and isn't now, or ought to be human and isn't, you keep your eyes 
on it and feel for your hatchet. And that's why the Witch is always on the lookout for any humans in 
Narnia. She's been watching for you this many a year, and if she knew there were four of you she'd be 
more dangerous still." 
"What's that to do with it?" asked Peter. 
"Because of another prophecy," said Mr Beaver. "Down at Cair Paravel - that's the castle on the sea 
coast down at the mouth of this river which ought to be the capital of the whole country if all was as 
it should be - down at Cair Paravel there are four thrones and it's a saying in Narnia time out of mind 
that when two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve sit in those four thrones, then it will be the 
end not only of the White Witch's reign but of her life, and that is why we had to be so cautious as we 
came along, for if she knew about you four, your lives wouldn't be worth a shake of my whiskers!" 
All the children had been attending so hard to what Mr Beaver was telling them that they had noticed 
nothing else for a long time. Then during the moment of silence that followed his last remark, Lucy 
suddenly said: 
"I say-where's Edmund?" 
There was a dreadful pause, and then everyone began asking "Who saw him last? How long has he 
been missing? Is he outside? and then all rushed to the door and looked out. The snow was falling 
thickly and steadily, the green ice of the pool had vanished under a thick white blanket, and from 
where the little house stood in the centre of the dam you could hardly see either bank. Out they went, 
plunging well over their ankles into the soft new snow, and went round the house in every direction. 
"Edmund! Edmund!" they called till they were hoarse. But the silently falling snow seemed to muffle 
their voices and there was not even an echo in answer. 
"How perfectly dreadful!" said Susan as they at last came back in despair. "Oh, how I wish we'd 
never come." 
"What on earth are we to do, Mr Beaver?" said Peter. 
"Do?" said Mr Beaver, who was already putting on his snow-boots, "do? We must be off at once. 
We haven't a moment to spare!" 
"We'd better divide into four search parties," said Peter, "and all go in different directions. Whoever 
finds him must come back here at once and-" 
"Search parties, Son of Adam?" said Mr Beaver; "what for?" 
"Why, to look for Edmund, of course!" 
"There's no point in looking for him," said Mr Beaver. 
"What do you mean?" said Susan. "He can't be far away yet. And we've got to find him. What do 
you mean when you say there's no use looking for him?" 
"The reason there's no use looking," said Mr Beaver, "is that we know already where he's gone!" 
Everyone stared in amazement. "Don't you understand?" said Mr Beaver. "He's gone to her, to the 
White Witch. He has betrayed us all." 
"Oh, surely-oh, really!" said Susan, "he can't have done that." 
"Can't he?" said Mr Beaver, looking very hard at the three children, and everything they wanted to 
say died on their lips, for each felt suddenly quite certain inside that this was exactly what Edmund 
had done. 
"But will he know the way?" said Peter. 
"Has he been in this country before?" asked Mr Beaver. "Has he ever been here alone?" 
"Yes," said Lucy, almost in a whisper. "I'm afraid he has." 
"And did he tell you what he'd done or who he'd met?" 
"Well, no, he didn't," said Lucy. 
"Then mark my words," said Mr Beaver, "he has already met the White Witch and joined her side, 
and been told where she lives. I didn't like to mention it before (he being your brother and all) but the 
moment I set eyes on that brother of yours I said to myself `Treacherous'. He had the look of one who 
has been with the Witch and eaten her food. You can always tell them if you've lived long in Narnia; 
something about their eyes." 
"All the same," said Peter in a rather choking sort of voice, "we'll still have to go and look for him. 
He is our brother after all, even if he is rather a little beast. And he's only a kid." 
"Go to the Witch's House?" said Mrs Beaver. "Don't you see that the only chance of saving either 
him or yourselves is to keep away from her?" 
"How do you mean?" said Lucy. 
"Why, all she wants is to get all four of you (she's thinking all the time of those four thrones at Cair 
Paravel). Once you were all four inside her House her job would be done - and there'd be four new 
statues in her collection before you'd had time to speak. But she'll keep him alive as long as he's the 
only one she's got, because she'll want to use him as a decoy; as bait to catch the rest of you with." 
"Oh, can no one help us?" wailed Lucy. 
"Only Aslan," said Mr Beaver, "we must go on and meet him. That's our only chance now." 
"It seems to me, my dears," said Mrs Beaver, "that it is very important to know just when he slipped 
away. How much he can tell her depends on how much he heard. For instance, had we started talking 
of Aslan before he left? If not, then we may do very well, for she won't know that Aslan has come to 
Narnia, or that we are meeting him, and will be quite off her guard as far as that is concerned." 
"I don't remember his being here when we were talking about Aslan -" began Peter, but Lucy 
interrupted him. 
"Oh yes, he was," she said miserably; "don't you remember, it was he who asked whether the Witch 
couldn't turn Aslan into stone too?" 
"So he did, by Jove," said Peter; "just the sort of thing he would say, too!" 
"Worse and worse," said Mr Beaver, "and the next thing is this. Was he still here when I told you 
that the place for meeting Aslan was the Stone Table?" 
And of course no one knew the answer to this question. 
"Because, if he was," continued Mr Beaver, "then she'll simply sledge down in that direction and get 
between us and the Stone Table and catch us on our way down. In fact we shall be cut off from 
Aslan. " 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested