c# mvc website pdf file in stored in byte array display in browser : Delete pages out of a pdf SDK application service wpf azure .net dnn smith_modern_optical_engineering19-part118

Delete pages out of a pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages in reader; delete blank pages from pdf file
Delete pages out of a pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete a page from a pdf; pdf delete page
173
Optical Materials and
Interference Coatings
7.1 Reflection, Absorption, Dispersion
To  be  useful  as  an  optical  material,  a  substance  must  meet  certain
basic  requirements.  It  should  be  able  to  accept  a  smooth  polish,  be
mechanically  and  chemically  stable,  have  a  homogeneous  index  of
refraction, be free of undesirable artifacts, and of course transmit (or
reflect)  radiant energy in  the wavelength region  in  which  it is  to  be
used.
The two characteristics of an optical material which are of primary
interest  to the  optical engineer  are its transmission  and its index  of
refraction, both of which vary with wavelength. The transmission of an
optical element must  be  considered  as  two  separate  effects.  At  the
boundary surface between two optical media, a fraction of the incident
light is reflected. For light normally incident on the boundary the frac-
tion is given by
R=
(7.1)
where n and n′ are  the  indices  of  the  two  media  (a  more  complete
expression for Fresnel surface reflection is given in Sec. 7.9).
Within the optical element, some of the radiation may be absorbed
by  the  material. Assume  that  a  1-mm  thickness  of  a  filter  material
transmits 25 percent of the incident radiation at a given wavelength
(excluding surface reflections). Then 2 mm will transmit 25 percent of
25 percent and 3 mm will transmit 0.25 × 0.25 × 0.25 = 1.56 percent.
(n′ - n)
2

(n′ + n)
2
Chapter
7
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET
delete page in pdf preview; delete pages from pdf document
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
copy page from pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
Therefore, if t is the transmission of a unit thickness of material, the
transmission through a thickness of x units will be given by
T= t
x
(7.2)
This  relationship  is  often  stated  in  the  following  form,  where  a is
called the absorption coefficient and is equal to -log
e
t.
T= e
-ax
(7.3)
Thus, it can be seen that the total transmission through an optical ele-
ment is a sort of product of its surface transmissions and its internal
transmission. For a plane parallel plate in air, the transmission of the
first surface is given (from Eq. 7.1) as
T= 1 - R = 1-
=
(7.4)
Now the light transmitted through the first surface is partially trans-
mitted by the medium and goes on to  the second surface, where it is
partly reflected  and partly  transmitted. The reflected  portion passes
(back) through  the  medium and  is partly  reflected and  partly  trans-
mitted by the first surface, and so on. The resulting transmission can
be expressed as the infinite series
T
1.2
=T
1
T
2
(K + K
3
R
1
R
2
+K
5
(R
1
R
2
)
2
+K
7
(R
1
R
2
)
3
+
.. .
)
(7.5)
=
where T
1
and T
2
are the transmissions of the two surfaces, R
2
and R
1
are the reflectances of the surfaces, and K is the transmittance of the
block  of  material  between  them.  (This  equation  can  also  be  used  to
determine the transmission of two or more elements, e.g., flat plates,
by finding first T
1,2
and R
1,2
, then using T
1,2
and T
3
together, and so on.)
If we set T
1
=T
2
=4n/(n + 1)
2
from Eq. 7.4 into Eq. 7.5, and assume
that K = 1, we find that the transmission, including all internal reflec-
tions, of a completely nonabsorbing plate is given by
T=
(7.6)
This is obviously the maximum possible transmission of an uncoated
plate of index n.
Similarly, the reflection is given by
R= 1 - T =
(7.7)
(n - 1)
2

(n
2
+1)
2n

(n
2
+1)
T
1
T
2
K

1- K
2
R
1
R
2
4n

(n + 1)
2
(n - 1)
2

(n + 1)
2
174
Chapter Seven
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete pages of pdf preview; cut pages out of pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages on pdf online; delete page in pdf
It should be emphasized that the transmission of a material, being
wavelength-dependent, may not  be treated as  a simple number  over
any appreciable wavelength interval. For example, suppose that a fil-
ter  is  found  to transmit 45 percent of the incident energy between 1
and 2 μm. It cannot be assumed that the transmission of two such fil-
ters in series will be 0.45 × 0.45 = 20 percent unless they have a uni-
form  spectral  transmission  (neutral  density).  To  take  an  extreme
example, if the filter transmits nothing from 1 to 1.5 μm and 90 per-
cent from  1.5  to  2  μm,  its “average” transmission  will be 45 percent
within the 1- to 2-μm band. However, two such filters, when combined,
will transmit zero from 1 to 1.5 μm, and about 81 percent from 1.5 to
2μm, for an “average” transmission of about 40 percent, rather than
the 20 percent which two neutral density filters would transmit.
The photographic density of a filter is the log of its opacity (the re-
ciprocal of transmittance), thus
D= log
=-log T
where D is the density and T is the transmittance of the material. Note
that transmittance does not account for surface reflection losses; thus,
density is directly proportional to thickness. To a fair approximation,
the density of a “stack” of neutral density absorption filters is the sum
of the individual densities.
Equation 7.3 can be written to the  base  10 if desired. This is done
when the  term  “density” is  used  to  describe the  transmission  of,  for
example, a photographic filter. The equation becomes
T= 10
-density
so that a density of 1.0 means a transmission of 10 percent, a density
of 2.0 means a transmission of 1 percent, etc. Note that densities can
be  added. A neutral  absorbing  filter  with  a  density  of  1.0  combined
with a filter of density 2.0 will yield a density of 3.0 and a transmis-
sion of 0.1 × 0.01 = 0.001 = 10
-3
.
Index dispersion
The index of refraction of an optical material varies with wavelength
as indicated in Fig. 7.1 where a very long spectral range is shown. The
dashed portions of the curve represent absorption bands. Notice that
the index rises markedly at each absorption band, and then begins to
drop  with  increasing  wavelength.  As  the  wavelength  continues  to
increase,  the  slope  of  the  curve  levels  out  until  the  next  absorption
band  is  approached,  where  the  slope  increases  again.  For  optical 
1
T
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
175
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
cut pages from pdf reader; add and delete pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages of pdf; reader extract pages from pdf
materials we usually need concern ourselves with only one section of
the curve, since most optical materials have an absorption band in the
ultraviolet and another in the infrared and their useful spectral region
lies between the two.
Many investigators have attacked the problem of devising an equa-
tion  to  describe  “the  irrational  variation  of  index”  with  wavelength.
Such expressions are of value in interpolating between, and smoothing
the data of, measured points on the dispersion curve, and also in the
study  of  the  secondary  spectrum  characteristics  of  optical  systems.
Several of these dispersion equations are listed below.
Cauchy
n() = a +
+
+
.. .
(7.8)
Hartmann
n() = a +
+
(7.9)
Conrady
n() = a +
+
(7.10)
Kettler-Drude n
2
() = a +
+
+
.. .
(7.11)
Sellmeier
n
2
() = a +
+
+
+
.. .
(7.12)
Herzberger
n() = a + b
2
+
+
(7.13)
Old Schott
n
2
() = a + b
2
+
+
+
+
(7.14)
The new Schott catalog uses the Sellmeier equation (Eq. 7.12).
The constants (a, b, c, etc.) are, of course, derived for each individual
material  by  substituting  known  index  and  wavelength  values  and
solving  the  resulting  simultaneous  equations  for  the  constants.  The
Cauchy equation obviously allows for only one absorption band at zero
wavelength. The Hartmann formula is an empirical one but does allow
absorption bands to be located at wavelengths c and e. The Herzberger
expression is an approximation of the Kettler-Drude  equation and  is
reliable through the visible to about 1 μm in the near infrared. In his
f
8
e
6
d
4
c
2
d

(
2
-0.035)
2
e

(
2
-0.035)
f
2
g- 
2
d
2
e- 
2
b
2
c- 
2
d
e- 
2
b
c- 
2
c
3.5
b
d
(e - )
b
(c - )
c
4
b
2
176
Chapter Seven
Figure  7.1
Dispersion  curve  of
an optical material. The dashed
lines indicate absorption bands.
(Anomolous dispersion.)
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Replace Text in Consecutive PDF Pages. Demo
delete blank page in pdf; delete page numbers in pdf
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET NET control allows users to black out image in PDF
delete pages out of a pdf; delete pages in pdf
later  work, Herzberger used 0.028 as the denominator  constant. The
Conrady equation is empirical and designed for optical glass in the vis-
ible  region.  All  these  equations  suffer  from  the  drawback  that  the
index approaches infinity as an absorption wavelength is approached.
Since little use is made of  any material close  to an absorption  band,
this is usually of small consequence.
Equation 7.14 was used by Schott and other optical glass manufac-
turers  as  the  dispersion  equation  for  optical  glass.  It  is  accurate  to
about 3 × 10
-6
between 0.4 and 0.7 μm, and to about 5 × 10
-6
between
0.36  and  1.0  μm.  The  accuracy  of  Eq.  7.14  can  be  improved  in  the
ultraviolet by adding a term in 
4
, and in the infrared by adding a term
in 
-10
. More recently, glass manufacturers have switched to Eq. 7.12,
the Sellmeier equation, in order to improve the accuracy.
The  dispersion  of  a  material  is  the  rate  of  change  of  index  with
respect to wavelength, that is, dn/d. From Figs. 7.1 and 7.2, it can be
seen  that  the  dispersion  is  large  at  short  wavelengths  and  becomes
less  at  longer  wavelengths.  At  still  longer  wavelengths,  the  disper-
sion  increases  again  as  the  long-wavelength  absorption  band  is
approached. Notice in Fig.  7.2 that the glasses have almost identical
slopes for wavelengths beyond 1 μm.
For materials which are used in the visible spectrum, the refractive
characteristics are conventionally specified by giving two numbers, the
index  of  refraction  for  the  helium  d line  (0.5876  μm)  and  the Abbe 
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
177
SAPPHIRE (AI
2
O
3
)
SF1 (717-295)
F4
SK8 (611-559)
F4 (617-366)
BK7 (517-642)
BARIUM FLUORIDE (B
0
F
2
)
18
17
16
15
.3
.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
WAVELENGTH IN MICRONS
VISUAL
RESP.
INDEX OF REFRACTION
Figure 7.2
The dispersion curves for four optical glasses and two
crystals.
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET PDF Viewer, such as rotate PDF page and zoom in or zoom out PDF page.
delete blank page in pdf online; delete page in pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
add or remove pages from pdf; delete page from pdf
V-number, or reciprocal relative dispersion. The V-number, or V-value,
is defined as
V=
(7.15)
where n
d
, n
F
,and n
C
are the indices of refraction for the helium d line,
the hydrogen F line (0.4861 μm), and the hydrogen C line (0.6563 μm),
respectively. Note that  ∆n = n
F
-n
C
is  a  measure of the dispersion,
and its ratio with n
d
-1 (which effectively indicates the basic refract-
ing power of the material) gives the dispersion relative to the amount
of bending that a light ray undergoes.
For optical glass, these two numbers describe the glass type and are
conventionally written (n
d
-1):V as a six-digit code.  For  example,  a
glass with an n
d
of 1.517 and a V of 64.5 would be identified as 517:645.
For many purposes, the index and V-value are sufficient information
about a material. For secondary spectrum work, however, it is neces-
sary to know more, and the relative partial dispersion
P
C
=
(7.16)
is  frequently  used  for  this  purpose.  P
C
is  a  measure  of  the  rate  of
change of the slope of the index vs. wavelength curve (i.e., the curva-
ture or second derivative). Note that a relative partial dispersion can
be defined for any portion of the spectrum and that most glass catalogs
list about a dozen partials.
The  index  of  refraction  values  conventionally  given  in  catalogs,
handbooks, etc., are those arrived at by measuring a sample piece in
air,  and  are thus  the  index  relative  to  the  index  of  air at  the  wave-
length, temperature, humidity, and pressure encountered in the mea-
surement. Since the index is used in optical calculations as a relative
number, this causes no difficulty if the index of air is assumed to be 1.0
(unless the optical system is to be used in a vacuum, in which case the
catalog index must be adjusted for the index of air; see Sec. 1.2).
7.2 Optical Glass
Optical  glass  is  almost  the  ideal  material  for  use  in  the  visual  and
near-infrared spectral regions. It is stable, readily fabricated, homoge-
neous, clear, and economically available in a fairly wide range of char-
acteristics.
Figure 7.3 gives some indication of the variety of the available optical
glasses. Each point in the figure represents a glass whose n
d
is plotted
against its V-value; note that the V-values are conventionally plotted in
reverse, i.e., descending, order. Glasses are somewhat arbitrarily divided
n
d
-n
C
n
F
-n
C
n
d
-1
n
F
-n
C
178
Chapter Seven
into two groups, the crown glasses and the flint glasses, crowns having a
V-value of 55 or more if the index is below 1.60, and 50 or more for an
index  above  1.60;  the  flint  glasses  are  characterized  by  V-values  less
than these limits. The “glass line” in Fig. 7.3 is the locus of the ordinary
optical glasses made by adding lead oxide to crown glass. These glasses
are relatively cheap, quite stable, and readily available.
The addition of lead oxide to crown glass causes its index to rise, and
its V-value  to decrease,  along the  glass  line.  Immediately  above  the
glass line are the barium crowns and flints; these are produced by the
addition of barium oxide to the glass mix. In Fig. 7.3 these are identi-
fied by the  symbol Ba  for barium.  This  has  the  effect of  raising  the
index without markedly lowering the V-value. The rare earth glasses
are a completely different family  of  glasses  based on  the rare earths
instead of silicon dioxide (which is the major constituent of the other
glasses). These are identified by the symbol La in Fig. 7.3, signifying
the presence of lanthanum.
The  table  of  Fig.  7.4  lists  the  characteristics  of  the  most  common
optical glass types. Each glass type in the table is available from the
major glass manufacturers, so that all types listed are readily obtain-
able.  The  index  data  given  are  taken  from  the  Schott  catalog;  the
equivalent  glasses  from  other  suppliers  may  have  slightly  different
nominal characteristics.
Formerly, optical glass was made by heating the ingredients in a large
clay pot, or crucible, stirring the molten mass for uniformity, and care-
fully  cooling  the  melt.  The  hardened  glass  was  broken  into  chunks
which  were  then sorted  to select pieces  of good  quality. Currently  the
molten glass is more likely to be poured into a large slab mold; this gives
better control over the size of the pieces of glass available. Many barium
glasses and  all  the  rare earth glasses  are processed  in platinum cru-
cibles, since the highly corrosive molten glass tends to attack the walls
of a clay pot and the dissolved pot materials affect the glass character-
istics.  In  extremely  large  volume  production,  a  continuous  process  is
used, with the raw materials going in one end of the furnace and emerg-
ing as  extruded  strip  or rod  glass at  the  other  end.  Raw  glass is  fre-
quently pressed into blanks, which are roughly the size and shape of the
finished  element.  The  final  stage  before  the  glass  is  ready  for  use  is
annealing. This is a slow cooling process, which may take several days
or weeks, and which relieves strains in the glass, assures homogeneity
of index, and brings the index up to the catalog value.
The characteristics of optical glass vary somewhat from melt to melt
(because of variations in composition and processing) and also due to
variations in annealing procedures. Ordinarily the lower index glass-
es (to  n = 1.55), are supplied to a tolerance of ±0.001 on the  catalog
value of n
d
,the higher index glasses may vary ±0.0015 from the nom-
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
179
Figure 7.3The “glass veil.” Index (nd) plotted against the reciprocal relative dispersion
(AbbeV-value). The glass types are indicated by the letters in each area. The “glass line” is
made up of the glasses of types K, KF, LLF, LF, and SF which are strung along the bottom
of the veil. (Note that K stands for kron,German for “crown,” S stands for schwer,or “heavy
or dense.”) (Courtesy of Schott Glass Technologies, Inc., Duryea, Pa.)
180
Figure 7.4Characteristics of a selection of optical glasses. CR, FR, SR, and AR are codes
indicating the resistance of the glass to staining or hazing due to environmental attack; the
higher the number, the lower the resistance; αis the thermal expansion coefficient, and Tg
is the transformation temperature. Dis the density, HK is the Knoop hardness, and iis the
internal transmittance at 0.4 μm for a thickness of 25 mm.
181
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested