c# mvc website pdf file in stored in byte array display in browser : Delete pdf pages online application software utility azure windows .net visual studio smith_modern_optical_engineering2-part119

at  a  wavelength  of  about  one  millimeter.  The  ultraviolet  region
extends from the lower end of the visible spectrum to a wavelength of
about 0.01 μm at the beginning of the x-ray region. The wavelengths
associated with the colors seen by the eye are indicated in Fig. 1.2.
The ordinary units of wavelength measure in the optical region are
the angstrom  (Å); the millimicron (mμ),  or nanometer (nm); and the
micrometer (μm), or micron (μ). One micron is a millionth of a meter, a
millimicron is a thousandth of a micron, and an angstrom is one ten-
thousandth of a micron (see Table 1.1). Thus, 1.0 Å = 0.1 nm = 10
-4
μm.
The frequency equals the velocity c divided by the wavelength, and the
wavenumber is the reciprocal of the wavelength, with the usual dimen-
sion of cm
-1
.
1.2 Light Wave Propagation
If we consider light waves radiating from a point source in a vacuum as
shown in Fig. 1.3, it is apparent that at a given instant each wave front
is  spherical  in  shape,  with  the  curvature  (reciprocal  of  the  radius)
decreasing as the wave front travels away from the point source. At a
sufficient distance from the source the radius of the wave front may be
regarded as infinite. Such a wave front is called a plane wave.
2
Chapter One
Figure 1.1
The electromagnetic spectrum.
Delete pdf pages online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from a pdf; delete blank page in pdf online
Delete pdf pages online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages out of a pdf; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
The distance between successive waves is of course the wavelength
of the radiation. The velocity of propagation of light waves in vacuum
is approximately 3 × 10
10
cm/s. In other media the velocity is less than
in vacuum. In ordinary glass, for example, the velocity is about two-
thirds of the velocity in free space. The ratio of the velocity in vacuum
to the velocity in a medium is called the index of refraction of that
medium, denoted by the letter n.
Index of refraction n =
(1.1)
Both wavelength and velocity are reduced by a factor of the index; the
frequency remains constant.
velocity in vacuum

velocity in medium
General Principles
3
Figure 1.2
The “optical” portion
of the electromagnetic spectrum.
TABLE 
1.1 Commonly Used Wavelength Units
Centimeter =
10
-2
meter
Millimeter
=
10
-3
meter
Micrometer =
10
-6
meter
=
10
-3
millimeter
Micron
=
10
-6
meter
=
10
-3
millimeter
Millimicron =
10
-3
micron
=
1.0 nanometer
=
10
-6
millimeter
=
10
-9
meter
Nanometer =
10
-9
meter
=
1.0 millimicron
Angstrom
=
10
-10
meter
=
0.1 nanometer
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete pdf pages ipad
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages from pdf online; delete page on pdf document
Ordinary air has an index of refraction of about 1.0003, and since
almost all optical work (including measurement of the index of refrac-
tion) is carried out in a normal atmosphere, it is a highly convenient
convention to express the index of a material relative to that of air
(rather  than  vacuum), which  is then  assumed  to  have  an  index  of
exactly 1.0.
The actual index of refraction for air at 15°C is given by
(n-1) ×10
8
=8342.1 +
+
where ν = 1/ ( = wavelength, in μm). At other temperatures the
index may be calculated from
(n
t
-1) =
The  change  in  index  with  pressure  is  0.0003  per  15  lb/in
2
 or
0.00002/psi.
If we trace the path of a hypothetical point on the surface of a wave
front as it moves through space, we see that the point progresses as a
straight line. The path of the point is thus what is called a ray of light.
Such a light ray is an extremely convenient fiction, of great utility in
understanding  and analyzing  the action  of  optical systems, and  we
shall devote the greater portion of this volume to the study of light
rays. Note that the ray is normal to the wave front, and vice versa.
The preceding discussion of wave fronts has assumed that the light
waves were in a vacuum, and of course that the vacuum was isotropic,
i.e.,  of  uniform  index  in  all  directions.  Several  optical  crystals  are
anisotropic; in such media wave fronts as sketched in Fig. 1.3 are not
spherical. The waves travel at different velocities in different direc-
tions, and thus at a given instant a wave in one direction will be fur-
ther from the source than will a wave traveling in a direction for which
the media has a larger index of refraction.
1.0549 (n
15°
-1)

(1 + 0.00366t)
15,996

(38.9-ν
2
)
2,406,030

(130-ν
2
)
4
Chapter One
Figure  1.3
Light  waves radiat-
ing from a  point  source in  an
isotropic medium take a spheri-
cal form; the radius of curvature
of the wave front is equal to the
distance from the point source.
The path of a point on the wave
front is called a light ray, and in
an  isotropic  medium  is  a
straight line. Note also that the
ray is normal to the wave front.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete pages pdf online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
add or remove pages from pdf; delete pages pdf document
Although  most optical  materials  may  be  assumed  to  be isotropic,
with a completely homogeneous index of refraction, there are some sig-
nificant exceptions. The earth’s atmosphere at any given elevation is
quite uniform in index, but when considered over a large range of alti-
tudes, the index varies from about 1.0003 at sea level to 1.0 at extreme
altitudes. Therefore, light rays passing through the atmosphere do not
travel in exactly straight lines; they are refracted to curve toward the
earth, i.e., toward the higher index. Gradient index optical glasses are
deliberately fabricated to bend light rays in controlled curved paths. We
shall assume homogeneous media unless specifically stated otherwise.
1.3 Snell’s Law of Refraction
Let us now consider a plane wave front incident upon a plane surface
separating two media, as shown in Fig. 1.4. The light is progressing
from the top of the figure downward and approaches the boundary sur-
face at an angle. The parallel lines represent the positions of a wave
front at regular intervals of time. The index of the upper medium we
shall call n
1
and that of the lower n
2
. From Eq. 1.1, we find that the
velocity in the upper medium is given by v
1
=c/n
1
(where cis the veloc-
ity in vacuum ≈ 3 × 10
10
cm/s) and in the lower by v
2
=c/n
2
. Thus, the
velocity in the upper medium is n
2
/n
1
times the velocity in the lower,
and the distance which the wave front travels in a given interval of time
in the upper medium will also be n
2
/n
1
times that in the lower. In Fig.
1.4 the index of the lower medium is assumed to be larger so that the
velocity in the lower medium is less than that in the upper medium.
At time t
0
our wave front intersects the boundary at point A; at time
t
1
=t
0
+∆t it intersects the boundary at B. During this time it has
moved a distance
d
1
=v
1
∆t =
∆t
(1.2a)
in the upper medium, and a distance
c
n
1
General Principles
5
Figure  1.4
A plane  wave  front
passing  through  the  boundary
between two media of differing
indices of refraction (n
2
>n
1
).
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete pages of pdf online
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Security PDF component download. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
delete a page from a pdf; delete pages in pdf reader
d
2
=v
2
∆t =
∆t
(1.2b)
in the lower medium.
In Fig. 1.5 we have added a ray to the wave diagram; this ray is the
path of the point on the wave front which passes through point B on
the surface and is normal to the wave front. If the lines represent the
positions of the wave at equal intervals of time, AB and BC, the dis-
tances between intersections, must be equal. The angle between the
wave front and the surface (I
1
or I
2
) is equal to the angle between the
ray (which is normal to the wave) and the normal to the surface XX′.
Thus we have from Fig. 1.5
AB =
=BC =
and if we substitute the values of d
1
and d
2
from Eq. 1.2, we get
=
which, after canceling and rearranging, yields
n
1
sin I
1
=n
2
sin I
2
(1.3)
This expression is the basic relationship by which the passage of light
rays is traced through optical systems. It is called Snell’s law after one
of its discoverers.
Since Snell’s law relates the sines of the angles between a light ray
and the normal to the surface, it is readily applicable to surfaces other
c
t
n
2
sin I
2
c
t
n
1
sin I
1
d
2
sin I
2
d
1
sin I
1
c
n
2
6
Chapter One
Figure 1.5
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
cut pages from pdf file; delete page in pdf document
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
delete page from pdf; delete page pdf file
than the plane which we used in the example above; the path of a light
ray may be calculated through any surface for which we can determine
the point of intersection of the ray and the normal to the surface at that
point.
The  angle I
1
between the incident ray and surface normal is cus-
tomarily referred to as the angle of incidence; the angle I
2
is called the
angle of refraction.
For all optical media the index of refraction varies with the wave-
length of light. In general the index is higher for short wavelengths
than for  long  wavelengths.  In the  preceding discussion  it has been
assumed that the light incident on the refracting surface was mono-
chromatic, i.e., composed of only one wavelength of light. Figure 1.6
shows a ray of white light broken into its various component wave-
lengths  by refraction  at a surface. Notice that  the blue  light ray  is
bent, or refracted, through a greater angle than is the ray of red light.
This is because n
2
for blue light is larger than n
2
for red. Since n
2
sin
I
2
=n
1
sin I
1
=a constant in this case, it is apparent that if n
2
is larg-
er for blue light than red, then I
2
must be smaller for blue than red.
This  variation in  index  with wavelength is  called  dispersion;  when
used as a differential it is written dn, otherwise dispersion is given by
∆n = n
1
-n
2
, where 
1
and 
2
are the wavelengths of the two colors
of light for which the dispersion is given. Relative dispersion is given
by ∆n/(n - 1) and, in effect, expresses the “spread” of the colors of light
as a fraction of the amount that light of a median wavelength is bent.
General Principles
7
Figure 1.6
Showing the disper-
sion of white light into its con-
stituent  colors  by  refraction
(exaggerated for clarity).
All of the light incident upon a boundary surface is not transmitted
through the surface; some portion is reflected back into the incident
medium. A construction similar to that used in Fig. 1.5 can be used to
demonstrate  that  the  angle  between  the  surface  normal  and  the
reflected ray (the angle of reflection) is equal to the angle of incidence,
and that the reflected ray is on the opposite side of the normal from
the incident ray (as is the refracted ray). Thus, for reflection, Snell’s
law takes on the form
I
incident
=-I
reflected
(1.4)
Figure 1.7 shows the relationship between a ray incident on a plane
surface and the reflected and refracted rays which result.
At this point it should be emphasized that the incident ray, the nor-
mal, the reflected ray, and the refracted ray all lie in a common plane,
called the plane of incidence, which in Fig. 1.7 is the plane of the paper.
1.4 The Action of Simple Lenses and
Prisms on Wave Fronts
In Fig. 1.8 a point source P is emitting light; as before, the arcs cen-
tered about P represent the successive positions of a wave front at reg-
ular intervals of time. The wave front is incident on a biconvex lens
consisting of two surfaces of rotation bounding a medium of (in this
instance) higher  index of refraction than  the medium in  which  the
8
Chapter One
Figure 1.7
Relationship between
a ray incident on a plane surface
and the reflected and refracted
rays which result.
source  is  located.  In  each  interval  of  time  the  wave  front  may  be
assumed to travel a distance d
1
in the medium of the source; it will
travel a lesser distance d
2
in the medium of the lens. (As in the pre-
ceding discussion, these distances are related by n
1
d
1
=n
2
d
2
.) At some
instant, the vertex of the wave front will just contact the vertex of the
lens surface at point A. In the succeeding interval, the portion of the
wave front inside the lens will move a distance d
2
, while the portion of
the same wave front still outside the lens will have moved d
1
. As the
wave front passes through the lens, this effect is repeated in reverse at
the second surface. It can be seen that the wave front has been retard-
ed  by  the  medium  of  the  lens  and  that  this  retardation  has  been
greater in the thicker central portion of the lens, causing the curvature
of the wave front to be reversed. At the left of the lens the light from P
was diverging, and to the right of the lens the light is now converging
in the general direction of point P′. If a screen or sheet of paper were
placed at P′, a concentration of light could be observed at this point.
The lens is said to have formed an image of P at P′. A lens of this type
is called a converging, or positive, lens. The object and image are said
to be conjugates.
Figure  1.8  diagrams  the  action  of a  convex  lens—that  is,  a  lens
which is thicker at its center than at its edges. A convex lens with an
index higher  than that  of  the surrounding medium is a converging
lens, in that it will increase the convergence (or reduce the divergence)
of a wave front passing through it.
In Fig. 1.9 the action of a concave lens is sketched. In this case the
lens is thicker at the edge and thus retards the wave front more at the
edge than at the center and  increases the divergence. After passing
through the lens, the wave front appears to have originated from the
neighborhood of point P′, which is the image of point P formed by the
lens. In this case, however, it would be futile to place a screen at P′ and
General Principles
9
Figure 1.8
The passage of a wave front through a converging, or posi-
tive, lens element.
expect to find a concentration of light; all that would be observed would
be the general illumination produced by the light emanating from P.
This type of image is called a virtual image to distinguish it from the
type of image diagramed in Fig. 1.8, which is called a real image. Thus
a virtual image may be observed directly or may serve as a source to be
reimaged by a subsequent lens system, but it cannot be produced on a
screen.  The terms  “real” and  “virtual” also  may be applied  to  rays,
where “virtual” applies to the extended part of a real ray.
The path of a ray of light through the lenses of Figs. 1.8 and 1.9 is the
path traced by a point on the wave front. In Fig. 1.10 several ray paths
have been drawn for the case of a converging lens. Note that the rays
originate  at  point  P and  proceed  in  straight  lines  (since  the  media
involved are isotropic) to the surface of the lens where they are refracted
according to Snell’s law (Eq. 1.3.) After refraction at the second surface
the rays converge at the image P′. (In practice the rays will converge
exactly at P′ only if the lens surfaces are suitably chosen surfaces of
rotation,  usually  nonspherical,  whose  axes  are  coincident  and  pass
through P.) This would lead one to expect that the concentration of light
at P′ would be a perfect point. However, the wave nature of light caus-
es it to be diffracted in passing through the limiting aperture of the lens
so that the image, even for a “perfect” lens, is spread out into a small
disc of light surrounded by faint rings as discussed in Chap. 6.
In Fig. 1.11 a wave front from a source so far distant that the cur-
vature of the wave front is negligible is shown approaching a prism,
which has two flat polished faces. As it passes through each face of the
prism, the light is refracted downward so that the direction of propa-
gation is deviated. The angle of deviation of the prism is the angle
between the incident ray and the emergent ray. Note that the wave
front remains plane as it passes through the prism.
If the radiation incident on the prism consisted of more than one
wavelength, the shorter-wavelength radiation would be slowed down
more by the medium composing the prism and thus deviated through
a greater angle. This is one of the methods used to separate different
wavelengths of light and is, of course, the basis for Isaac Newton’s clas-
sic demonstration of the spectrum.
10
Chapter One
Figure  1.9
The  passage  of  a
wave front through a diverging,
or negative, lens element.
1.5 Interference and Diffraction
If a stone is dropped into still water, a series of concentric ripples, or
waves, is generated and spreads outward over the surface of the water.
If two stones are dropped some distance apart, a careful observer will
notice that where the waves from the two sources meet there are areas
with waves twice as large as the original waves and also areas which
are almost free of waves. This is because the waves can reinforce or
cancel out the action of each other. Thus if the crests (or troughs) of
two  waves  arrive  simultaneously  at  the  same  point,  the  crest  (or
trough) generated is the sum of the two wave actions. However, if the
crest of one wave arrives at the same instant as the trough of the oth-
er, the result is a cancellation. A more spectacular display of wave rein-
forcement can often be seen along a sea wall where an ocean wave
which has struck the wall and been reflected back out to sea will com-
bine with the next incoming wave to produce an eruption where they
meet.
Similar phenomena occur when light waves are made to interfere. In
general, light from the same point on the source must be made to trav-
el two separate paths and then be recombined, in  order to  produce
optical interference. The familiar colors seen in soap bubbles or in oil
films on wet pavements are produced by interference.
General Principles
11
Figure 1.10
Showing the relationship between light rays and the wave front
in passing through a positive lens element.
Figure  1.11
The  passage  of  a
plane wave front through a re-
fracting prism.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested