in space, and with movement. However, these com-
partments of the brain hardly work in isolation from
each other. If you look at images of the brain at
work, you’ll see that it is highly interactive. Like the
rest of our bodies, these functions are all related.
Legs have a major role in running, but a leg on its
own is frankly rather poor at it. In the same way,
many different parts of the brain are involved when
we play or listen to music, from the more recently
evolved cerebral cortex to the older, so-called reptili-
an parts of the brain. These have to work in concert
with the rest of our body, including the rest of the
brain. Of course, we all have strengths and weak-
nesses in the different functions and capacities of the
brain. But like the muscles in our arms and legs,
these capacities can grow weaker or stronger de-
pending on how much we exercise them separately
and together.
By the way, there’s some suggestion in recent re-
search that women’s brains may be more interactive
than men’s brains. The jury is still out on this, but
reading about it reminded me of an old question in
Western philosophy that professors often give col-
lege freshmen to debate. It’s about the relationship
between our senses and our knowledge of the world.
The essence of the question is whether we can know
131/446
Delete pages on pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf online; delete pages on pdf online
Delete pages on pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete blank pages from pdf file; delete pages of pdf preview
something is true if we don’t have direct evidence of
it through our senses, and the usual example is this:
“If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear
it, does it make a sound?” I used to teach some philo-
sophy courses, and the students and I could debate
this sort of thing in an earnest way for weeks on end.
The answer, I think, is, “Of course it does, don’t be so
ridiculous.” But, you know, I had tenure, so there
was really no need to rush this conversation. A re-
cent trip to San Francisco reminded me of these de-
bates. I was wandering through a street market and
saw someone wearing a T-shirt that said, “If a man
speaks his mind in a forest and no woman hears him,
is he still wrong?” Probably.
Whatever gender differences there may be in
everyday thinking, creativity is always a dynamic
process that may draw on many different ways of
thinking at the same time. Dance is a physical, kines-
thetic process. Music is a sound-based art form. But
many dancers and musicians use mathematics as an
integral part of their performances. Scientists and
mathematicians often think in visual ways to picture
and test their ideas.
Creativity also uses much more than our brains.
Playing instruments, creating images, constructing
objects, performing a dance, and making things of
132/446
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page from pdf file; cut pages from pdf preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page in pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
every sort are also intensely physical processes that
depend on feelings, intuition, and skilled coordina-
tion of hands and eyes, body and mind. In many in-
stances—in dance, in song, in performance—we do
not use external media at all. We ourselves are the
medium of our creative work.
Creative work also reaches deep into our intuitive
and unconscious minds and into our hearts and feel-
ings. Have you ever forgotten someone’s name, or
the name of somewhere you’ve visited? Try as you
may, it’s often impossible to bring it to mind, and the
more you think about it, the more elusive it becomes.
Usually, the best thing you can do is stop trying and
“putit to the back of your mind.” Sometime later, the
name will probably show up in your head when
you’re least expecting it. The reason is that there is
far more to our minds than the deliberate processes
of conscious thought. Beneath the noisy surface of
our minds, there are deep reserves of memory and
association, of feelings and perceptions that process
and record our life’s experiences beyond our con-
scious awareness. So at times, creativity is a con-
scious effort. At others, we need to let our ideas fer-
ment for a while and trust the deeper unconscious
ruminations of our minds, over which we have less
control. Sometimes when we do, the insights we’ve
133/446
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page pdf file; delete pages of pdf online
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete blank page in pdf; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
been searching for will come to us in a rush, like “let-
ting a cork out of a bottle.”
Getting It Together
While you can see the dynamic nature of creative
thinking in the work of single individuals, it becomes
much more obvious when you look at the work of
great creative groups like the Traveling Wilburys.
The success of the group came about not because
they all thought in the same way, but because they
were all so different. They had different talents, dif-
ferent interests, and different sounds. But they found
aprocess of working together where their differences
stimulated each other to create something they
wouldn’t have come up with individually. It’s in this
sense that creativity draws not just from our own
personal resources but also from the wider world of
other people’s ideas and values. This is where the ar-
gument for developing our powers of creativity
moves up a gear.
Let’s go back to Shakespeare’s Hamlet. In
Shakespeare’s play Hamlet, the prince of Denmark is
torn by raging feelings about the death of his father
and the treachery of his mother and uncle.
134/446
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
cut pages from pdf; delete pages pdf files
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete pdf pages reader
Throughout the play, he wrestles with his feelings
about life and death, loyalty and betrayal, and his
significance in the wider universe. He struggles to
know what he should think and feel about the events
that are engulfing his spirit. Early in the play, he
greets Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, two visitors to
the royal Danish court. He welcomes them with
these words:
My excellent good friends! How dost thou,
Guildenstern? Ah, Rosencrantz! Good lads,
how do you both?
. . . what have you,
My good friends, deserved at the hands of
fortune,
That she sends you to prison hither?
The question surprises Guildenstern. He asks
Hamlet what he means by “prison.” Hamlet says,
“Denmark’s a prison.” Rosencrantz laughs and says
that if that’s true, then the whole world is a prison.
Hamlet says it is, and “a goodly one, in which there
are many confines, wards and dungeons, Denmark
being one of the worst.” Rosencrantz says, “We think
135/446
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages from a pdf reader; delete a page from a pdf reader
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete pages in pdf; delete pages from a pdf document
not so, my lord.” Hamlet’s reply is profound. “ ’Tis
none to you for there is nothing either good or bad,
but thinking makes it so: to me it is a prison.”
The power of human creativity is obvious every-
where, in the technologies we use, in the buildings
we inhabit, in the clothes we wear, and in the movies
we watch. But the reach of creativity is very much
deeper. It affects not only what we put in the world,
but also what we make of it—not only what we do,
but also how we think and feel about it.
Unlike all other species, so far as we can tell, we
don’t just get on in the world. We spend much of our
time talking and thinking about what happens and
trying to work out what it all means. We can do this
because of the startling power of imagination, which
underpins our capacity to think in words and num-
bers, in images and gestures, and to use all of these
to generate theories and artifacts and all the complex
ideas and values that make up the many perspectives
on human life. We don’t just see the world as it is; we
interpret it through the particular ideas and beliefs
that have shaped our own cultures and our personal
outlook. All of these stand between us and our raw
experiences in the world, acting as a filter on what
we perceive and how we think.
136/446
What we think of ourselves and of the world
makes us who we are and what we can be. This is
what Hamlet means when he says, “There is nothing
good or bad, only thinking makes it so.” The good
news is that we can always try to think differently. If
we create our worldview, we can re-create it too by
taking a different perspective and reframing our situ-
ation. In the sixteenth century, Hamlet said that he
thought of Denmark metaphorically as a prison. In
the seventeenth century, Richard Lovelace wrote a
poem for his love, Althea. Taking the opposite view,
Lovelace says that for him an actual prison would be
aplace of freedom and liberty so long as he could
think of Althea. This is how he closes his poem:
Stone walls do not a prison make,
Nor iron bars a cage;
Minds innocent and quiet take
That for an hermitage;
If I have freedom in my love
And in my soul am free,
Angels alone, that soar above,
Enjoy such liberty.
In the nineteenth century, William James became
one of the founding thinkers of modern psychology.
137/446
By then, it was becoming more widely understood
that our ideas and ways of thinking could imprison
or liberate us. James put it this way: “The greatest
discovery of my generation is that human beings can
alter their lives by altering their attitude of mind. . . .
If you change your mind, you can change your life.”
This is the real power of creativity and the true
promise of being in your Element.
138/446
CHAPTER FOUR
In the Zone
EWA LAURANCE is the most famous female bil-
liards player on the planet. Known as “the Striking
Viking,” she has been ranked number 1 in the world,
won both the European and U.S. national champion-
ships, has appeared on the cover of the New York
Times Magazine, been featured in People, Sports Il-
lustrated, Forbes, and many other publications,
makes regular television appearances, and serves as
a commentator on ESPN.
Growing up in Sweden, Ewa discovered the game
while trailing after her older brother.
“Me and my best friend, Nina, we were always
hanging around, just as close as friends can be. One
day, when I was fourteen, the two of us followed my
brother and his friend to this bowling alley to play
and decided to check it out. We were there for a
while and then got really bored. And then we found
out that they had gone to something called a pool-
room. I had never heard of pool. We followed them
up there and I remember, the minute I walked in, I
reacted to it right away. I loved the whole thing—this
dark room with lights over each table and the click-
ing of the balls. I just thought it was mesmerizing
right off the bat.
“There was this whole society there where every-
body knew this thing about billiards and it grabbed
me right away. We were intimidated and curious, but
just sat and watched everything. When you sit and
watch it, or do it yourself, everything disappears. It’s
easy for that to happen with billiards because each
table is a stage. So, everything around it disappeared
for me and that’s all I saw. I was watching these play-
ers who knew exactly what they were doing. I real-
ized that there’s more to this than just banging the
balls around and hoping something goes in. There
was one guy who ran ball, after ball, after ball, and
made sixty, seventy, eighty balls in a row and I real-
ized he was moving the white ball around to shoot
his next shot. And somehow, it clicked in. It was
their knowledge and skill that really amazed
me—that chess part of billiards, of playing three,
four moves ahead and then having to execute it on
top of it.”
From that moment of epiphany, Ewa knew that
she wanted to dedicate her life to billiards.
140/446
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested