I’m not sure he was right about that. I actually
think it might have had a great deal to do with how
Bill did his job, as is likely the case with all people
who discover the Element in a pursuit other than
their jobs. My guess is that the satisfaction and ex-
citement Bill found photographing surfers made it so
much easier for him to be effective at what he
thought of as the relative drudgery of helping cus-
tomers choose from dozens of paint samples, finish
options, and decisions about running boards. The
creative outlet he found in his photography made
him that much more patient and helpful in his day
job.
The need for an outlet of this sort manifests itself
in many forms. One that I find fascinating is the
emergence of the corporate rock band. Unlike the
company softball team, which tends to fill its roster
with young people from the mailroom, these bands
tend to include a lineup of senior executives (unless
someone in the mailroom is a great bass player) who
once dreamed of being rock stars before settling into
other careers. The passion with which many of these
amateur musicians play shows that such an avoca-
tion offers a level of fulfillment they can’t find in
their work, regardless of how accomplished they are
at their jobs.
341/446
Add or remove pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete pages from a pdf in preview
Add or remove pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf document; delete page in pdf file
For four years now, there has been a rock festival
of sorts put together in New York to benefit the char-
ity A Leg to Stand On. What distinguishes this rock
benefit show from all others is that every member of
every band (with the exception of a couple of ringers)
is in the hedge fund business. “By day, most of the
performers manage money,” states one of the press
releases for Hedge Fund Rocktoberfest, “but when
they turn off their trading screens, they turn on the
music.”
“By 11 p.m., everyone is either thinking about their
4a.m. train ride the next morning or the fact that the
Tokyo markets are now open,” noted Tim Seymour,
one of the performers. But while the show is on, it’s
pure revelry, with managers covering classic hits or
even donning skimpy outfits to serve as backup sing-
ers. The contrast between the day job and this is dra-
matic and, by all indications, liberating for everyone
who participates.
Transformation
Finding the Element is essential to a balanced and
fulfilled life. It can also help us to understand who
we really are. These days, we tend to identify
342/446
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
manipulations. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete page in pdf preview
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Remove the password. doc.Save(outputFilePath); C# Sample Code: Add Password to Plain PDF
delete blank page in pdf; delete page pdf online
ourselves by our jobs. The first question at parties
and social gatherings is often, “What do you do?” We
dutifully answer with a top-line description of our
professions: “I’m a teacher,” “I’m a designer,” “I’m a
driver.” If you don’t have a paid job, you might feel
somewhat awkward about this and find the need to
give an explanation. For so many of us, our jobs
define us, even to ourselves—and even if the work we
do doesn’t express who we really feel we are. This
can be especially frustrating if your job is unful-
filling. If we’re not in our Element at work, it be-
comes even more important to discover that Element
somewhere else.
To begin with, it can enrich everything else you do.
Doing the thing you love and that you do well for
even a couple of hours a week can make everything
else more palatable. But in some circumstances, it
can lead to transformations you might not have ima-
gined possible.
Khaled Hosseini immigrated to America in 1980,
got a medical degree in the 1990s, and set off on a
career practicing internal medicine in the Bay Area.
In his heart, though, he knew he wanted to be a
writer and that he wanted to tell the story of life in
Afghanistan prior to the Soviet invasion. While con-
tinuing his medical practice, he began work on a
343/446
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
cut pages from pdf online; delete blank page from pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
add and delete pages in pdf; add and remove pages from a pdf
novel about two boys growing up in Kabul. That nov-
el became The Kite Runner, a book that has sold
more than four million copies and generated a recent
film.
Hosseini’s pursuit of his most intense interests,
even while he was working hard at another profes-
sion, transformed him in profound ways. The suc-
cess of The Kite Runner has allowed him to go on an
extended sabbatical from medicine and to concen-
trate on writing full-time. He published his second
novel, the best-selling A Thousand Splendid Suns, in
2007. “I enjoyed practicing medicine and was always
honored that patients put their trust in me to take
care of them and their loved ones,” he said in a re-
cent interview. “But writing had always been my pas-
sion, since childhood. I feel ridiculously fortunate
and privileged that writing is, at least for the time be-
ing, my livelihood. It is a dream realized.”
Like Khaled Hosseini’s, Miles Waters’s first career
was in the medical profession. He began practicing
as a dentist in England in 1974. And like Hosseini,
Waters had a burning passion for an entirely differ-
ent field. In Waters’s case, it was popular music.
He’d played in bands at school and started writing
songs along the way. In 1977, he scaled back his
dental practice to spend more time at songwriting. It
344/446
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Help to add or insert bookmark and outline into PDF file in .NET framework. Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document.
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; delete pdf pages online
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Add metadata to PDF document in C# .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file. Also a PDF metadata extraction control.
delete page numbers in pdf; delete a page from a pdf reader
took him several years to make inroads, but he even-
tually wrote several hit songs and began to earn a liv-
ing in the music field. He quit dentistry for a period
and worked full-time as a writer and producer, con-
tributing to an album by Jim Capaldi (from the le-
gendary rock band Traffic) that featured work from
Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood, and George Harrison.
He’s traveled in the same circles as Paul McCartney
and Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour. These days, he
shuttles between music and dentistry, maintaining a
practice while still composing and producing.
John Wood made a fortune as a marketing execut-
ive for Microsoft. During a trip to the Himalayas,
though, he came upon a school in an impoverished
village. The school taught four hundred and fifty stu-
dents, but had only twenty books—and not one of
these was a children’s book. When Wood asked the
school’s headmaster how the school got by with such
apaucity of books, the headmaster enlisted his aid.
Wood began collecting books and raising money for
this school and others, doing the work on nights and
weekends while dealing with a hugely demanding
day job. Finally, he walked away from Microsoft for
his true calling—Room to Read, a nonprofit organiz-
ation with the goal of extending literacy in poor
countries. Several of his Microsoft colleagues
345/446
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
delete a page from a pdf in preview; delete page from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in
Add permanent metadata to PDF document in VB .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata content from PDF file in Visual Basic .NET application.
delete page from pdf online; delete pages of pdf
thought he’d lost his mind. “It was incomprehensible
to many of them,” he said in an interview. “When
they found out I was leaving to do things like deliver-
ing books on the backs of donkeys, they thought I
was crazy.” Room to Read has been transformational
not only for Wood, but for thousands and thousands
of others. The nonprofit organization has created
more than five thousand school libraries in six coun-
tries with plans to extend that reach to ten thousand
libraries and fifteen countries by 2010.
Beyond Leisure
There’s an important difference between leisure and
recreation. In a general sense, both words suggest
processes of physical or mental regeneration. But
they have different connotations. Leisure is generally
thought of as the opposite of work. It suggests
something effortless and passive. We tend to think of
work as something that takes our energy. Leisure is
what we do to build it up again. Leisure offers a res-
pite, a passive break from the challenges of the day, a
chance to rest and recharge. Recreation carries a
more active tone—literally of re-creating ourselves. It
suggests activities that require physical or mental
346/446
effort but which enhance our energies rather than
depleting them. I associate the Element much more
with recreation than with leisure.
Dr. Suzanne Peterson is a management professor
at the W. P. Carey School of Business and Center for
Responsible Leadership at Arizona State University
and a consultant for an executive coaching firm.
She’s also a championship dancer, twice winning the
Holiday Dance Classic in Las Vegas and grabbing the
2007 Hotlanta US Open Pro-Am Latin Champion-
ship, among others.
Suzanne took some dance classes when she was a
teenager, but she never seriously considered dance
as a career. Suzanne knew from the time she was in
high school that she wanted to be an executive. “I
didn’t grow up knowing exactly what I wanted to be,
but I knew that I wanted to wear business suits,
speak to large groups of people and have them listen
to me, and have a title. I always saw myself as being
able to wear great business suits for some reason.
And I liked the idea that I could visualize myself in
front of groups of people and have something im-
portant to say. But dancing was not a passion when I
was young. It was something you did because what
else do girls do as a hobby if they don’t want to play
soccer and baseball?”
347/446
Her rediscovery of dance and the intense excite-
ment that accompanied it this time around came
nearly accidentally. “I was just looking for a hobby
and my achievement and motivation got the best of
me. I was about twenty-six, and I was in graduate
school. At this time, salsa and swing dancing were
getting popular, so I’d just go into the social dance
studio and I would watch. I’d mimic what the teach-
ers were doing. Slowly but surely I started taking
group lessons and then some private lessons. The
next thing I know, it’s this huge part of my life. So it
really was a progression based on my belief that I
had the requisite talent for it and sort of the basic
ability level. But probably my academic side allowed
me to study it and focus on it just like any other
subject.
“And I literally would study it like any other aca-
demic science. Huge visualization. I would sit on
planes and I would visualize myself going through all
the dances. So anytime I couldn’t physically practice,
Iwould mentally practice. I could feel the music. I
could feel the emotions. I could see the facial expres-
sions. And I would come the next day to the dance
studio after being gone and I would be better. And
my dance partner would say, ‘How did you get better
overnight? Weren’t you traveling to Philadelphia?’
348/446
and I would say, ‘Oh, I practiced on the plane.’ And I
literally would practice up to two hours in my head
totally uninterrupted.
“I went into dancing the same way I go into my ca-
reer—you give 110 percent and you go in strong and
powerful. And I realized that when you do that in
dancing, it’s too much. You lose the femininity and,
all of a sudden, you’re in everybody’s face so much.
The business side is power and confidence and all
these things. And the dancing is vulnerability and
sensuality, everything soft. You go from one to the
other and I enjoy them equally.”
Suzanne in fact seems to have found her Element
in multiple ways. She loves her profession, and she
loves what she does for recreation. “If I’m really
teaching something about leadership that I’m pas-
sionate about, I get the same exact feeling except
that it’s just a different emotion. I mean I feel confid-
ent and powerful and very connected to the audience
and I want to make a difference. And then in the
dancing I feel more vulnerable, a little less confid-
ence. But they’re both escapes in different ways and I
get completely engulfed in them and get very moved
by them emotionally.”
349/446
Ultimately, though, her life has added meaning be-
cause she’s chosen a recreational pursuit that is ful-
filling, rather than simply entertaining. “It’s taught
me more about communication than studying com-
munication ever could. You realize the effect that you
have on another person. If you were in a bad mood,
that person knows it in a second just touching your
hand. And so in my head I could feel the perfect con-
nection that’s in a partnership, the perfect commu-
nication. I would feel extremely happy.
“It’s a flow experience. I mean it’s a complete re-
lease. I don’t think about anything. I don’t think
about anything good in my life. I don’t think about
anything bad in my life. Literally, I would not get dis-
tracted if gunshots went off. It’s really amazing.”
Suzanne’s sister, Andrea Hanna, is an executive
assistant working in Los Angeles. Like Suzanne,
she’s found a pursuit beyond her job that adds di-
mension to her life.
“I didn’t like writing until my senior year of high
school,” she told me. “My English teacher told us to
write a compelling college entrance essay about any-
thing of our choice. Like most assignments, I
dreaded the idea of sitting down and writing a five-
paragraph essay that was just going to end up
350/446
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested