41
of two transmission pathways; the faecal-oral pathway (i.e. 
disease-causing microbes originating from faecal contamina-
tion make their way when water is ingested); or the ecosystem, 
where wastewater collects providing an ecological niche for 
the propagation of certain human diseases vectors. The latter 
group includes lymphatic filariasis, and in some parts of the 
world, for some vector species, West Nile infection; it does not, 
however, include malaria, as the anopheline vectors of this dis-
ease generally do not breed in wastewater.
Non-communicable disease
Direct evidence of ill-health related to exposure to toxic com-
pounds is harder to establish. This is because of complexities 
in the exposure pathways and the long-term effect of exposure 
to low doses over extended periods of time, during which other 
hazards and risks will complicate the picture. Pesticides and 
pesticide residues in agricultural run-off, heavy metals and toxic 
compounds in industrial waste, the group of persistent organic 
pollutants (which includes many first generation synthetic pes-
ticides), endocrine disruptors and pharmaceutical and person 
care products all feature as confirmed, incriminated or suspect 
chemicals that pose health hazards.
ACCESS TO SANITATION
The  connection  between  wastewater  and  human  health  is 
linked with access to sanitation and with human waste dispos-
al. Adequate sanitation is expected to create a barrier between 
disposed human excreta and sources of drinking-water. Waste-
water management is a key component of health risk manage-
ment in this context.
Access to basic sanitation is part of the 2015 water and sanita-
tion target under Millennium Development Goal 7: to halve, 
by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable 
access to safe drinking-water and basic sanitation. The WHO/
UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) is the formal 
mechanism to keep track of progress towards achieving these 
targets. Information up to  2006 showed 2.5 billion people 
lacked access to basic sanitation (WHO/UNICEF, 2008). The 
2010 JMP report (WHO/UNICEF, in print) will report that fig-
ure estimated to be 2.6 billion at the end of 2008. This means 
that, taking population growth into account the situation has 
remained stagnant and progress towards the sanitation target 
is off track.
Table 1: Global burden of disease and the relative disease burden caused by diarrhoeal diseases (measured in DALYs), 2004
Disease or injury
Lower respiratory infections
Diarrhoeal diseases
Unipolar depressive disorders
Ischaemic heart disease
HIV/AIDS
Tuberculosis
Malaria
Disability-adjusted life years, 
all age groups (millions)
94.5
72.8
65.5
62.6
58.5
34.2
34.0
Disability-adjusted life years, 
children 0–14 years (millions)
73.6
65.2
8.5
3.4
32.4
Percentage of total 
DALYs, all age groups
6.2
4.8
4.3
4.1
3.8
2.2
2.2
1
2
3
4
5
...
11
12
Source: WHO (2008)
Delete pdf pages reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf document; cut pages out of pdf
Delete pdf pages reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete blank page in pdf; copy pages from pdf to word
42
Regionally, there are large variations in progress towards this 
MDG. For sanitation, the regions of Africa south of the Sahara 
and southern Asia show the greatest disparity, with 330 mil-
lion and 221 million people without access to basic sanitation, 
respectively. Not surprisingly, the regional variations in lack 
of access are proportionally mirrored in the diarrhoeal dis-
ease data. Figure 16 presents the regional child mortality rates 
from diarrhoea for which lack of access to sanitation is the 
root-cause, modulated by regional differences in the capacity 
of health services.
THE SANITATION LADDER
In their efforts to monitor progress in achieving the MDG wa-
ter and sanitation target, WHO and UNICEF designed the sani-
tation ladder. The sanitation ladder reflects incremental prog-
ress even in situations where it is not possible to achieve the 
full MDG target. Poverty is the overarching determinant, and 
the position of a community on the sanitation ladder therefore 
relates to that community’s capacity to deal with wastewater 
management as well. Not only do higher rungs on the ladder 
reflect a better sanitation starting point for effective wastewater 
management, but the corresponding improved socio-economic 
status will also permit a greater capacity to manage wastewater 
and invest in the necessary infrastructure.
Figure 16: Child mortality rates by cause and region, 2004. 
Source: WHO, 2008.
Source: WHO, 2008. 
Child mortality rates
Percentage
High 
income 
countries
Americas
Western 
Pacific
Europe
South East 
Asia
Eastern 
Mediterranean
Africa
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
Perinatal conditions
Diarrhoeal diseases
Respiratory diseases
Malaria diseases
Other causes
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages in pdf; delete page pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
add and delete pages in pdf online; add and remove pages from pdf file online
43
WASTEWATER AND ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION
All waterways are connected. The unregulated discharge of wastewater therefore has 
far reaching implications for the health of all aquatic ecosystems, which threatens to 
undermine the resilience of biodiversity and the ecosystem services on which human 
wellbeing depends. One such impact, eutrophication is a major global concern affecting 
the functioning of marine and freshwater ecosystems. To address these challenges we 
must apply the principles of integrated ecosystem-based management so that the eco-
system services on which we depend can be sustained through the watershed and into 
the marine environment.
Water quality changes at the first point of extraction or use, 
whether this is the impact of livestock production, release of nu-
trients and sedimentation through deforestation, or the myriad 
of agricultural, industrial and urban activities taking place in 
the watershed all the way to the coastal zone and open ocean 
via rivers, ground water, aquifers and storm water run-off. These 
changes can impact aquatic environments in the following ways:
Mechanical impacts
The impact of water extraction can influence water quality 
through changes in sediment loading and thermal stress which 
can change the physical environment, increasing turbidity or 
scouring and in turn affect biodiversity. For example, changes 
in sediment loading of rivers can impact downstream habitats 
that provide ecosystem services of waste and nutrient assimi-
lation. Many aquatic organisms and habitats such as bivalves, 
mangroves, salt marshes, fresh water marshes and sea grasses 
have a natural capacity to assimilate a certain amount of pol-
lutants, such as nitrates and phosphates. Changes in sediment 
supplies can result in either smothering of sea grasses and 
coral reefs, or if restricted reduce the essential supply required 
for the accretion of coastal wetlands, resulting in the decline of 
these critically important and sensitive habitats.
Eutrophication
Eutrophication is one of the most prevalent global problems 
of our time. It is a process by which lakes, rivers, and coastal 
waters become increasingly rich in plant biomass as a result 
of the enhanced input of plant nutrients mainly nitrogen and 
phosphorus in general originating from agricultural and ur-
ban areas, through the soil or directly into rivers and oceans 
(Gilbert, 2008, Nyenje et al, 2010). The impacts of eutrophi-
cation can result in profound environmental change and im-
pact the ecological integrity of aquatic systems e.g. Agricul-
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete page from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide.
delete page from pdf; add remove pages from pdf
44
tural run-off exacerbating the spreading of dead zones (Diaz 
and Rosenberg, 2008): current agricultural practices, convert 
about 120 million tonnes of nitrogen from the atmosphere 
per year into reactive nitrogen containing compounds (Rock-
ström et al, 2009). Up to two thirds of this nitrogen makes its 
way into inland waterways and the coastal zone, exceeding all 
natural inputs to the nitrogen cycle. Approximately 20 million 
tonnes of phosphorus are mined each year for fertilizers, al-
most half returns to the ocean – approximately eight times the 
natural input (Rockström et al, 2009a). Together, this excess 
nitrogen and phosphorus drive potentially toxic algal booms 
and changes in biodiversity which can in turn lead to devastat-
ing hypoxic events and enhancing dead zones (Tilman, 1998; 
Rockström et al, 2009b) resulting in huge economic losses 
across many sectors (Figueredo and Giani, 2001, Hernández-
Figure 17: The ratio of treated to untreated wastewater reaching water bodies for 10 regions. An estimated 90 per cent of all wastewa-
ter in developing countries is discharged untreated directly into rivers, lakes or the oceans (UN Water, 2008).
Sources: UNEP-GPA, 2004.
Adapted from a map by Ahlenius, H., 
http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/ratio
-of-wastewater-treatment 
Mediterranean
Untreated
Treated
Caribbean
West and
Central Africa
Southern
Asia
East
Asia
Caspian Sea
Central and East Europe
Baltic Sea
North
Atlantic
Western
Europe
Ratio of wastewater treatment
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pages from pdf in reader; copy page from pdf
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete pages from a pdf in preview; reader extract pages from pdf
45
Shancho et al, 2010). Dead zones are now thought to affect 
more than 245 000 km2 of marine ecosystems, predominantly 
in  the  northern  hemisphere  (Diaz  and  Rosenberg,  2008), 
equivalent to the total global area of coral reefs.
Toxicity, saphrogens and mutagens
A wide range of toxic pollutants from land based sources are 
found in both fresh and marine waters ranging from agricul-
tural and industrial chemicals such as organic compounds, 
heavy metals to personal-care products and pharmaceuticals. 
The impacts of these are wide-ranging. In the north east of 
Australia, run-off of agricultural herbicides caused the loss of 
30 km
2
of mangrove between 1999 and 2002. In areas where 
mangroves were lost, the near shore zone suffered greater tur-
bidity, nutrient loading and sediment loading as well as greater 
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
delete pdf pages online; delete page on pdf
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete pages from a pdf reader; delete pdf pages reader
46
exposure to the herbicide toxins which then had toxicological 
effects on other highly valued marine ecosystems such as the 
reefs and lagoons of the Great Barrier Reef (Duke et al, 2005). 
Another example of transfer of terrestrial pathogens to marine 
mammals concerns Toxoplasma gondii, a pathogen of marine 
mammals commonly found in domestic cats and terrestrial 
wild mammals. It is believed that the oocysts from cat faeces 
are washed into seawater where they remain a source of infec-
tion for up to two years, depending on the water temperature 
(Lindsay and Dubey, 2009)
Coastal regions and Small Island Developing States (SIDS) rep-
resent an area of particular concern as they contain some of 
the most productive ecosystems. It is here that human popu-
lations concentrate – they are the most densely populated on 
the planet, and yet the most productive. This zone where land 
and sea meet has historically been a strategic location for hu-
man communities, with good positioning for trade and secu-
rity, productive land and water providing access to food and 
energy sources. Twenty-one of the world’s 33 megacities are on 
the coast (Martínez et al, 2007). By 2015, the coastal population 
is expected to reach approximately 1.6 billion people, nearly 
22.2% of the global total (Manson, 2005).
This increasing pressure from changing climate and growing 
populations threatens the continued provision of vital services, 
in particular where economies are highly dependent on coastal 
resources. In Zanzibar, a Tanzanian island off the east coast of 
Africa, for example, marine ecosystem services account for 30 
per cent of GDP, 77 per cent of investment, and a large amount 
of foreign exchange and employment. The value of tourism 
alone in 2007 accounted for 25 per cent of GDP, five times 
greater than the combined value of all the other ecosystem val-
ues and dependent on a healthy marine environment. How-
ever uncontrolled release of wastewater from Zanzibar town 
into the coastal zone is a particular threat to water quality and 
ecosystem integrity impacting the two main economic activi-
ties – fisheries and tourism – a risk for the very assets that tour-
ists pay to come and see (Lange and Jiddawi, 2009). In Carib-
bean SIDS, the economies of some states are almost entirely 
dependent on the health of their reefs for tourism, fisheries 
and shoreline protection. Degradation of the reefs could reduce 
Desalination of sea water is often the only viable option for 
providing safe drinking water in many arid, coastal regions or 
isolated locations such as small islands, An established tech-
nology since the 1950s, by 2006 approximately 24.5 million m
3
of water were being produced per day for drinking water, tour-
ism, industry and agriculture (58 per cent of all desalinated wa-
ter produced) (UNEP, 2008; Lattemann, and Hoepner, 2008). 
Production is expected to increase to 98 million m
3
a day by 
2015 (UNEP 2008). It is not however without consequences 
both in terms of high economic cost, energy requirements 
(Bleninger and Jirka, 2008; Lattemann, and Hoepner,2008; 
von Medeazza GLM 2005; Sadhwani et al, 2005; UNEP, 2008), 
environmental and social implications (Lattemann, and Ho-
epner,2008). There is scope to improve the sustainability of 
the desalination process.
The process results in the discharge of a concentrated brine 
into the receiving waters. Temperature and salinity are two 
factors that determine the composition and distribution of 
species in the marine environment affecting water density and 
causing stratification (Miri and Chouikhi ,2005;Lattemann and 
Hoepner,2008) changes to primary production and turbidity. 
Changes in these parameters over sustained periods could 
lead to local ecological changes, resulting in shifts in species 
diversity, opening the potential for the colonization of exotic 
and  potentially  invasive species,  and changing ecosystem 
function. The process requires the use of descaling and anti-
fouling products, which can contain heavy metals and toxic 
chemicals, although the impact of these can be managed with 
good practice and plant maintenance.
Desalination and impacts on the marine and
coastal environment
these net benefits by an estimated US$350–870 million a year 
(Burke and Maidens, 2004).
Healthy, functioning ecosystems provide a wide array of valu-
able services to human security and wellbeing. Coastal eco-
systems provide global services estimated at US$25 billion a 
year (Martínez et al, 2007) – contributing food security, shore-
line protection, tourism, carbon sequestration through blue 
47
Figure 18: Desalination is an increasingly important practice to secure clean water in a number of countries. Monitoring is key to 
minimize negative impacts on the ecosystem.
1 000
0
2 000
Algeria
Netherland 
Antilles
Mexico
Chile
South Africa
Russia
South 
Korea
Hong Kong
Taiwan
Indonesia
Australia
Singapore
India
Kazakhstan
Bahrain
Iraq
Iran
Italy
Netherlands
UK
Spain
Qatar
Oman
Japan
Libya
Egypt
Israel
Kuwait
Pacific 
Ocean
Atlantic 
Ocean
Indian 
Ocean
Sources: Pacific Institute, The World’s Water, 2009.
Note: only countries with more than 70 000 cubic metres per day are shown.
Water desalination
carbon sinks (Nelleman et al, 2009). However, loss of these 
ecosystems,  or  overburdening  through  poor  management 
of water and wastewater compromises the integrity of these 
ecosystems and the services they provide. Resulting in, con-
tamination of fish stocks, algae blooms, a rise in dead zones 
along the coasts, and subsequent loss of livelihoods and food 
security. The continued provision of these services requires 
management that will support healthy and functioning eco-
systems, not just in the marine environment, but in the entire 
watershed.
48
49
POPULATION GROWTH 
The world’s population is expected to grow by almost a third to 
over 9 billion people in the next 40 years (UNFPA, 2009), result-
ing in increased water usage, and increased demand for food and 
products. The amount of available fresh water resources, how-
ever will not increase. Over the period to 2050 the world’s water 
will have to support the agricultural systems that will feed and 
create livelihoods for an additional 2.7 billion people (UN, 2010).
Urban populations are projected to see the fastest growth rising 
from a current 3.4 billion to over 6.4 billion by 2050 (UNDESA, 
2008). Most cities in developing countries have an aging, in-
adequate or even non-existent sewage infrastructure, unable 
to keep up with rising population. Effective treatment also re-
quires a transportation infrastructure to deal with the growing 
masses and frequently unorganized settlement patterns.
Slum dwellers of the new millennium are no longer a few thou-
sand in a few cities of a rapidly industrializing continent, but 
include one out of every three city dwellers, close to a billion 
people, or a sixth of the world’s population and are projected to 
increase to 1.4 billion within a decade (UN-HABITAT 2009), 
meaning another 400 million people without basic sanitation 
or water supply by 2020. Over 90 per cent of slum dwellers to-
day are in the developing world. In sub-Saharan Africa, urban-
WASTEWATER AND GLOBAL CHANGE
ization has become virtually synonymous with slum growth. 
The slum population of sub-Saharan Africa almost doubled in 
15 years, reaching nearly 200 million in 2005. Seventy-two per 
cent of the region’s urban population lives under slum condi-
tions, compared to 56 per cent in South Asia. (UNFPA, 2007)
As cities continue to expand their size, footprint and slum ar-
eas, it is essential that wastewater management is brought into 
urban management and planning. Currently one fifth or 1.2 
billion people live in areas of physical water scarcity. It is esti-
mated that this will increase to 3 billion by 2025 as water stress 
and populations increase (UNDP, 2006 and DFID,2008)
CLIMATE CHANGE
The relationship between wastewater and climate change can 
be seen from three perspectives. Changing climatic conditions 
change the volume and quality of water availability in both time 
and space, thus influencing water usage practices. Secondly 
changes in climate will also require adaptation, in terms of how 
wastewater is managed. Finally, wastewater treatment results 
in the emission of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon diox-
ide (CO
2
) and methane (CH
4
) and nitrous oxide (N
2
O).
Changes to global climate patterns are a reality which impacts 
our daily lives (IPCC, 2007) and may affect water availability, 
Global populations are rapidly expanding with urban populations expected to double in 
the next 40 years (UNFPA, 2009), increasing demands on food and water resources and 
already inadequate wastewater infrastructure. This is in the light of changing climatic 
patterns, and water availability, weakened ecosystems and inconsistent and poorly in-
tegrated management. The challenges that unmanaged wastewater poses in the urban 
environment, to food production, industry, human health and the environment are in-
terconnected and becoming ever more severe. It is critical that wastewater management 
is dealt with urgently and given very high priority to become an integral part of urban 
planning and integrated watershed and coastal management. 
50
Figure 19.
in the timing and intensity of rainfall, or the period of time 
without rain, as well as affecting the quality of water in rivers 
and lakes through changes in the timing and volume of peak 
discharge and temperature (IPCC, 2007).
Anticipation of more droughts and extreme rainfall events has 
impacts for non-existent or old, inadequate wastewater treat-
ment facilities highlighting the need for infrastructure that can 
cope with extreme surges of wastewater. Changes in the reli-
ability of the water supply have major impacts on the livelihoods 
and health of the poorest communities which rely on rainfall or 
surface waters and tend to settle in the available low-lying flood-
exposed land, where floods also spread diseases and cause diar-
rhoea through the flooding of open sewage or inadequate sew-
age infrastructure. Increased capacity to capture and store water, 
as well as efficient use of water, and maximizing resources that 
are available will be important adaptation strategies.
Increasing  pressure on water resources  through increasing 
populations and more unreliable rainfall has in some regions 
pushed  the  exploitation  of  groundwater resources  as other 
sources decline. Eighty per cent of drinking water in Russia 
and  Europe  comes  from  these  slowly  repleating resources 
(Struckmeier et al, 2005).
Asia and the Pacific
Million people
Projection for
Africa
217
239
119
137
133
552
2 110
2050
2025
2010
2 964
West Asia
Europe
Latin America 
Caribbean
North 
America
Population living in river basins where freshwater withdrawal 
exceeds 40 per cent of renewable resources
Population by region was calculated averaging the results forecasted by the scenarios of the GEO-4 
report using the WaterGAP modeling. 
Source: Fourth Global Environment Outlook (GEO-4 report), UNEP,  2007.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested