c# open a pdf file : Cut pages out of pdf application software tool html azure asp.net online smith_modern_optical_engineering22-part122

precision.  Another  popular  monitoring  technique  utilizes  a  quartz
crystal of  the type used to control  radio broadcast frequencies.  The
oscillation frequency of such a crystal varies with its mass or thick-
ness. By depositing the coating directly on the crystal and measuring
its  oscillation  frequency,  the  coating  thickness  can  be  accurately 
monitored.
Let us first consider a single-layer film whose optical thickness (nt)
is exactly one-quarter of a wavelength. For light entering the film at
normal incidence, the wave reflected from the second surface of the
film will be exactly one-half wavelength out of phase with the light
reflected from the first surface when they recombine at the first sur-
face, resulting in destructive interference (assuming that there is no
phase change by reflection). If the amount of light reflected from each
surface is the same, a complete cancellation will occur and no light will
be reflected. Thus, if the materials involved are nonabsorbing, all the
energy incident on the surface will be transmitted. This is the basis of
the “quarter-wave” low-reflection coating which is almost universally
used to increase the transmission of optical systems. Since low-reflec-
tion coatings reduce reflections, they tend to eliminate ghost images as
well as the stray reflected light which  reduces contrast in the final
image. Before the invention of low-reflection coatings, optical systems
which consisted of many separate elements were impractical because
of the transmission losses incurred in surface reflections and the fre-
quent ghost images. Even complex lenses were usually limited to only
four air-glass surfaces. A magnesium fluoride coating has an addition-
al benefit in that it is actually (when properly applied) a protective
coating; the chemical stability of many glasses is enhanced by coating.
The reflectivity of a surface coated with one thin film is given by the
equation
R=
(7.21)
where
(7.22)
r
1
=
or
(7.23)
r
2
=
or
(7.24)
and  is the wavelength of light; t is the thickness of the film; n
0
,n
1
,
and n
2
are the refractive indices of the media; and I
0
,I
1
, and I
2
are the
angles of incidence and refraction. Figure 7.15 shows a sketch of the
tan (I
1
-I
2
)

tan (I
1
+I
2
)
-sin (I
1
-I
2
)

sin (I
1
+I
2
)
tan (I
0
-I
1
)

tan (I
0
+I
1
)
-sin (I
0
-I
1
)

sin (I
0
+I
1
)
X= 4πn
1
t
1
cos I
1

r
1
2
+r
2
2
+2r
1
r
2
cos X

1 + r
1
2
r
2
2
+2r
1
r
2
cos X
202
Chapter Seven
Cut pages out of pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf file; delete pdf pages in preview
Cut pages out of pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete pdf pages ipad
film and indicates the physical meanings of the symbols. The sine or
tangent expressions for r
1
and r
2
are chosen depending on the polar-
ization of the incident light as in Eq. 7.19; for unpolarized light, which
is  composed  equally  of  both  polarizations,  R is  computed  for  each
polarization and the two values are averaged. If we assume nonab-
sorbing materials, the transmission T equals (1 - R). At normal inci-
dence I
0
=I
1
=I
2
=0, and r
1
and r
2
reduce to
r
1
=
(7.25)
r
2
=
(7.26)
Using Eqs. 7.25 and 7.26 for r
1
and r
2
, Eq. 7.21 can be solved for the
thickness which yields a minimum reflectance. As the preceding dis-
cussion would lead one to expect, this occurs when the optical thick-
ness of the film is one-quarter wavelength, that is,
n
1
t
1
=
(7.27)
At  normal  incidence  the  reflectivity of  a quarter-wave film  is  thus
equal to
2
(7.28a)
and the film index which will produce a zero reflectance is
n
1
=
n
0
n
2
(7.28b)
(n
0
n
2
-n
1
2
)

(n
0
n
2
+n
1
2
)
4
n
1
-n
2
n
1
+n
2
n
0
-n
1
n
0
+n
1
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
203
Figure 7.15
Passage of light ray
through a thin film, indicating
the terms used in Eq. 7.21.
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET Image Cropper Control SDK to Cut Out Part of Image. Do you need to cut out certain unwanted part from one image file by VB.NET code?
delete page pdf file; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete blank page from pdf; delete page on pdf reader
204
Chapter Seven
Thus, to produce a coating which will completely eliminate reflections at
an air-glass surface, a quarter-wave coating of a material whose index is
the square root of the index of the glass is required. Magnesium fluoride
(MgF
2
) with an index of 1.38 is used for this purpose; its ability to form
a  hard  durable film  which  will withstand weathering and  frequently
cleaning is the prime reason for its use, despite the fact that its index is
higher than the optimum value for almost all optical glasses. Equation
7.28b  indicates  that  the  magnesium  fluoride,  with  its  index  of  1.38,
would be an ideal low-reflection coating material for a substrate with an
index of 1.38
2
=1.904. Thus it is a much more efficient low-reflection
coating for high-index glass than for ordinary glass of a lower index. The
measured  white light  reflection  of a low-reflection coating  on various
index materials is shown in Fig. 7.16.
From Eq. 7.21 it is apparent that the reflectivity of a coated surface
will vary with wavelength. Obviously a quarter-wave coating for one
wavelength will be either more or less than a quarter-wave thick for
other  wavelengths,  and  the  interference  effects  will  be  modified
accordingly. Thus a low-reflection coating designed for use in the visi-
ble region of the spectrum will have a minimum reflectance for yellow
light, and the reflectance for red and blue light  will be  appreciably
higher. This is the cause of the characteristic purple color of single-
layer low-reflection coatings. Figure 7.17 indicates this variation.
With more than one layer, more effective antireflection coatings can
be  constructed. Theoretically, two layers  allow  the  reduction of  the
reflection  to  zero,  provided  that  materials  of  suitable  index  are 
available; frequently, three layers are used for this purpose. Such a
coating  achieves  a  zero  reflectivity  at  a  single  wavelength  at  the
Figure  7.16
The  measured
reflection of white light from an
uncoated  surface  and  from  a
surface coated with a quarter-
wave MgF
2
low-reflection coat-
ing, as a function of the index of
the base material.
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete pages of pdf preview
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
delete pages of pdf online; delete page on pdf file
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
205
expense of a much higher reflectivity on either side. Because of the
shape of the reflectivity curve, this is called a V-coating. It is widely
used for monochromatic systems, such as those utilizing lasers as light
sources.
With  three  or  more  layers,  a  broad-band,  higher-efficiency,  low-
reflection coating may be achieved as shown in Fig. 7.17. Such a coat-
ing  may  have  two  minima  as  shown,  or  three,  depending  on  the
complexity of the coating design. A typical reflection over the visual
spectrum is to the order of 0.25 percent, sometimes with another 0.25
percent lost to scattering and absorption.
Thin-film computations
The  following  equations  can be used  to calculate the reflection and
transmission of an interference coating of any number of layers. The
equations can be used at oblique angles and will accommodate absorb-
ing materials. They do require a knowledge of complex arithmetic; if
not already familiar with the subject, the interested reader may wish
to consult a basic text on complex arithmetic. These equations are the
basis of most of the computer programs used in the design and evalu-
ation  of  thin  films.  The  formulas  given here  are  taken  from  Peter
Berning, in  G. Hass  (ed.),  Physics of Thin Films, vol. 1, Academic,
1963.
The reflection and transmission characteristics of a “stack” of sever-
al thin  films can be  expressed  in  explicit  equations;  however, their
complexity increases rapidly with the number of films, and the follow-
ing  recursion  expressions  are  usually  preferable.  The  physical 
thickness of each film is represented by t
j
and the index by n
j
=N
j
-
iK
j
(n is the complex index, N is the ordinary index of refraction, and
Figure 7.17 (a)
The spectral reflectivity of a single-layer quarter-wave MgF
2
coating,
compared with the reflectivity of uncoated glass. The solid curves are for a glass of
index 1.69 and the dashed curves are for an index of 1.52. (b) Multilayer coatings. The
solid line is a broadband multilayer low-reflection coating. The dashed curve is for a
“V-coating,” which can have zero reflectivity at a single wavelength.
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Please have a quick test by using the following C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
delete a page from a pdf in preview; cut pages from pdf file
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages from pdf reader; delete a page from a pdf acrobat
206
Chapter Seven
Kis the absorption coefficient, which is zero for nonabsorbing materi-
als). The angle of incidence within the jth film is 
j
; and the “effective”
refractive index is u
j
=n
j
cos
j
oru
j
=n
j
/cos 
j
(for light polarized with
the electric vector perpendicular to [s], or parallel to [p], the plane of
incidence, respectively). Thus, for oblique incidence  the  calculations 
are carried out  for  both polarizations and the  results  are  averaged
(assuming the incident light to be unpolarized and to consist of equal
parts of each polarization).
Since most calculations are carried out at normal incidence (
j
=0)
and for nonabsorbing materials (K
j
=0), one may ordinarily use u
j
=
n
j
=N
j
.
The subscript notation is j = 0 for the substrate, j = 1 for the first
film, j = 2 for the second, etc., j = p - 1 for the last film and j = p for
the final medium, which is usually air. For each film g
j
,the effective
optical thickness, in radians, is computed from
g
j
=
(7.29)
where  is the wavelength of light for which the calculation is made.
Starting with E
1
=E
0
+
=1.0 and H
1
=u
0
E
0
+
=u
0
, the following
equations are applied iteratively at each surface, with the subscript j
advancing from j = 1 to j = p - 1.
E
j+ 1
=E
j
cos g
j
+
sin g
j
(7.30)
H
j+1
=iu
j
E
j
sin g
j
+H
j
cos g
j
(7.31)
where i =
-1
and the other terms have been defined above. Readers
familiar with matrix notation may prefer to manipulate the equivalent
matrix form
 
=
 
(7.32)
When  Eqs. 7.30 and  7.31 (or  7.32)  have been  applied  to  the entire
stack, we have the values of E
p
and H
p
,which will generally be com-
plex numbers of the form z = x + iy. These are substituted into
E
p
+
=
E
p
+
=x
2
+iy
2
(7.33)
E
p
-
=
E
p
-
=x
1
+iy
1
(7.34)
and the reflectance of the thin-film system is found from
H
p
u
p
1
2
H
p
u
p
1
2
E
j
H
j
cos g
j
sin g
j
iu
j
sin g
j
cos g
j
E
j+ 1
H
j
+1
iH
j
u
j
2πn
j
t
j
cos 
j

u
i
j
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
cut pages from pdf preview; delete page from pdf acrobat
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Able to fill out all PDF form field in C#.NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK package provides PDF field processing features for your C# project.
delete blank pages in pdf; delete pages pdf document
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
207
R=
 
2
(7.35)
where the symbol |z| indicates the modulus of a complex number z, so
that
|z| = |x + iy| =
x
2
+y
2
and
R= |z|
2
=x
2
+y
2
=
 
2
=
If the computation has been for normal incidence through nonabsorb-
ing materials, the transmission is given by
T= 1 - R
(7.36)
Otherwise, the transmission is given by
T=
 
2
(7.37a)
or
T=
 
2
(7.37b)
where Eq. 7.37a is used for light polarized with the electric vector per-
pendicular to [s] and Eq. 7.3b for the electric vector parallel to [p] the
plane of incidence.
Adiscussion of the design of multilayer coatings is beyond the scope
of this volume; the interested reader may pursue the subject in the ref-
erences listed at the end of this chapter. By suitable combinations of
thin films of different indices and thicknesses a tremendous number 
of transmission and reflection effects can be created. Among the types
of interference coatings which are readily available are long- or short-
pass transmission filters, bandpass filters, narrow bandpass (spike fil-
ters), achromatic extra-low-reflection coatings as well as the reflection
coatings described in the next section. An extremely valuable property
of thin-film coatings is their spectral versatility. Once a combination of
films has been designed to produce a desired characteristic, the wave-
length region can be shifted at will by simply increasing or decreasing
all  the  film  thicknesses  in  proportion.  For  example,  a  spike  filter
designed to transmit a very narrow spectral band at 1 μm can be shift-
ed to 2 μm by doubling the thickness of each film in the coating. This,
of course, is limited by the absorption characteristics of the substrate
and the film materials.
E
0
+
E
p
+
n
0
cos 
p

n
p
cos 
0
E
0
+
E
p
+
n
0
cos 
0

n
p
cos 
p
x
1
2
+y
1
2
x
2
2
+y
2
2
x
1
+iy
1
x
2
+iy
2
E
p
-
E
p
+
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Users can rotate PDF pages, zoom in or zoom out PDF pages and go to any pages
delete a page from a pdf reader; delete a page from a pdf file
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET PDF page and zoom in or zoom out PDF page
delete pdf page acrobat; delete pages from a pdf online
208
Chapter Seven
Figure 7.18
Transmission of typical evaporated interference filters plotted
against wavelength in arbitrary units. (Upper left) Short-pass filter (note
that dashed portion of curve must be blocked by another filter if low long
wavelength transmission is necessary). (Upper right) Long-pass filter.
(Lower left) Bandpass filter. (Lower right) Narrow bandpass (spike) filter.
The characteristics of a number of typical interference coatings are
shown in Fig. 7.18. Note that the wavelength scale is plotted in arbi-
trary units, with a central wavelength of 1, since (within quite broad
limits) the characteristics can be shifted up or down the spectrum as
described in  the preceding  paragraph.  Most  interference filters  are
very nearly 100 percent efficient, so that the reflection for a film is
equal  to  one  minus  the  transmission  (except  in  regions  where  the
materials  used  become  absorbing).  Since  the  characteristics  of  an
interference filter depend on the thickness of the films, the character-
istics will change when the angle of incidence is changed. This is in
great measure due to the fact that the optical path through a film is
increased  when  the  light  passes  through  obliquely.  For  moderate
angles the effect is usually to  shift the spectral characteristics to a
slightly shorter wavelength.  The  wavelength  shift  with  obliquity  is
approximated by
θ
=
n
2
-s
in
2
θ
where 
θ
is the shifted wavelength at an angle of incidence of θ, 
0
is the
wavelength for normal incidence, and n is the “effective index” for the
coating stack (n is typically in the range of 1.5 to 1.9 for most coatings).
0
n
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
209
Coatings also shift wavelength effects with temperature; this shift is to
the order of one- or two-tenths of an angstrom per degree Celsius.
Coatings consisting of a few layers are for the most part reasonably
durable and can withstand careful cleaning. However, coatings con-
sisting of a great number of layers (and coatings consisting of 50 or
more layers are occasionally used) tend toward delicacy, and must be
handled with due respect.
Some multilayer coatings are quite effective polarizers when used
obliquely (and as such, are occasionally responsible for “mysterious”
happenings). This is notably true in systems using linearly polarized
laser beams. One must also exercise care in photometric or radiomet-
ric  applications  (e.g., spectrophotometers),  since polarization effects
can introduce significant errors.
7.10 Reflectors
Although polished bulk metals are occasionally used for mirror surfaces,
most optical reflectors are fabricated by evaporating one or more thin
films on a polished surface, which is usually glass. Obviously the inter-
ference filters described in the preceding section can be used as special-
purpose reflectors in instances where their spectral characteristics are
suitable. However, the workhorse reflector material for the great major-
ity of applications is an aluminum film deposited on a substrate by evap-
oration in vacuum. Aluminum has a broad spectral band of quite high
reflectivity and is reasonably durable when properly applied. Almost all
aluminum mirrors are “overcoated” with a thin protective layer of either
silicon monoxide or magnesium fluoride. This combination produces a
first-surface mirror which is rugged enough to withstand ordinary han-
dling and cleaning without undue scratching or other signs of wear.
The spectral reflectance characteristics of several evaporated metal
films are shown in Fig. 7.19. With the exception of the curve for rhodi-
um, the reflectivities given here can seldom be attained for practical
purposes; the silver coating will tarnish and the aluminum film will
oxidize, so that the reflectances tend to decrease with age, especially
at shorter wavelengths. The high reflectivity of silver is only useful
when the coating can be properly protected.
Figure 7.20 indicates the variety of characteristics which are avail-
able  in  commercial  aluminum  mirrors.  A run-of-the-mill  protected 
aluminum  mirror  can  be  expected  to  have  an  average  visual
reflectance of about 88 percent. Two, four, or more interference films
may be added to improve the reflectance where the additional cost can
be accepted. This enhanced reflectivity within the bandpass of the mir-
ror is obtained at the expense of a lowered reflectivity on either side,
as can be seen from the dashed curve in Fig. 7.20.
210
Chapter Seven
Figure 7.20
Spectral reflectance of aluminum mirrors. The solid curves are for
aluminum films with various types of thin film overcoatings—either for protec-
tion or for increased reflectivity. The dashed line is an extra-high-reflectance mul-
tilayer coating. All coatings shown are commercially available.
Dichroics  and  semireflecting  mirrors  constitute  another  class  of
reflector.  Both  are  used  to  split  a  beam  of  light  into  two  parts. A
dichroic reflector splits the light beam spectrally, in that it transmits
certain wavelengths and reflects others. A dichroic reflector is often
used for heat control in projectors and other illuminating devices. A
hot mirror is a dichroic which transmits the visible region of the spec-
trum  and  reflects  the  near  infrared.  A cold  mirror does  just  the
reverse, in that it transmits the infrared and reflects the visible. For
example,  a  cold  mirror  introduced  into  the  optical  path  will  allow
undesired heat in the form of infrared radiation to be removed from
Figure 7.19
Spectral reflectance for evaporated metal films on glass. Data repre-
sents new coatings, under ideal conditions.
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
211
the  beam  by  transmitting  it  to  a  heat  dump.  These  mirrors  have 
the  advantage  over  heat-absorbing  filter  glass  in  that  they  do  not 
themselves get hot and thus do not require a fan for cooling. A semire-
flecting mirror is, nominally at least, spectrally neutral; its function is
to divide a beam into two portions, each with similar spectral charac-
teristics. Figure 7.21 shows the characteristics of a variety of these
partial reflectors.
7.11 Reticles
Areticle is a pattern used at or near the focus of an optical system,
such as the cross hairs in a telescope. For a simple cross-hair pattern,
fine wire or spider (web) hair is occasionally used, stretched across an
open frame. However, a pattern which is supported on a glass (or oth-
er material) substrate offers considerably more versatility, and most
reticles, scales, divided circles, and patterns are of this type.
Figure 7.21
Characteristics of partial reflectors. (a) Multilayer “neutral” semi-
reflectors (efficiency better than 99 percent). (b) Dichroic multilayer reflec-
tors—blue, green, red, and yellow reflection. (c) Visual efficiency of aluminum
semireflectors. (d) Visual efficiency of chrome semireflectors.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested