c# open a pdf file : Delete page from pdf software Library dll winforms .net html web forms smith_modern_optical_engineering23-part123

212
Chapter Seven
The simplest type of reticle is produced by scribing, or scoring, the
glass surface with a diamond tool. A line produced this way, while not
opaque, modifies the glass sufficiently so that under the proper type of
illumination the line will appear dark. Where clear lines in an opaque
background are desired, the glass can be coated with an opaque coat-
ing, such as evaporated aluminum, and the lines scribed through the
coating with a diamond or hardened steel tool, depending on the type
of line desired. Scribing produces very fine lines.
Another  old technique  is to  etch  the  substrate material. A waxy
resist is coated on the substrate and the desired pattern cut through
the resist. The exposed portion of the substrate is then etched (with
hydrofluoric acid in the case of glass) to produce a groove in the mate-
rial. The groove can be filled with titanium dioxide (white), or lamp
black in a waterglass medium, or evaporated metal. Etched reticles
are durable and have the advantage that they can be edge-lighted if
illumination is necessary. Any substrate that is readily etched can be
used. This process is used for many military reticles and also for accu-
rate metrology scales on steel.
The most versatile processes for production of reticles are based on
the use of a photoresist, or photosensitive material. Photoresists are
exposed  like  a  photographic  emulsion,  either  by  contact  printing
through a master or by photography. However, when the photoresist is
“developed,” the exposed areas are left covered with the resist and the
unexposed areas are completely clear. Thus, an evaporated coating of
any of a number of metals (aluminum, chrome, inconel, nichrome, cop-
per, germanium,  etc.) can be deposited over the resist. In the clear
areas the coating adheres to the substrate; when the resist is removed,
it carries away the coating deposited upon it, leaving a durable pattern
which is an exact duplicate of the master. The precision, versatility,
ruggedness, and suitability for mass production of this technique have
earned it a prominent place in the field of reticle manufacture.
The  photoresist  technique  may  also  be  combined  with  etching,
where the material to be etched is either a metal substrate or an evap-
orated metal film.
Where  the  reticle  pattern  must  be  nonreflecting,  the  glue  silver
process or the black-print process is used. The technique is similar to
that used in producing the photoresist pattern, except that the photo-
sensitive material is opaque. The clear areas are free of emulsion. Glue
silver reticles are fragile but capable of very high resolution of detail.
The  black-print process is more  durable. Occasionally an extremely
high resolution photographic  emulsion is used  for  a  reticle pattern;
however, the presence of emulsion in the clear areas of the pattern is
ordinarily a drawback.
Delete page from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf online
Delete page from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
copy page from pdf; delete pages from a pdf
The  following  tabulation  indicates  the  resolution  and  accuracy
possible with these techniques. These figures represent the highest
level of quality that reticle manufacturers are capable of at the pre-
sent  time;  if  cost  is  a  factor,  one  is  well  advised  to  lower  one’s
requirements an order of magnitude or so below the levels indicated
here.
Finest line 
Dimensional
Minimum figure
Method
width, in
repeatability, in
height, in
Scribing
0.00001
±0.00001
Etch (and fill)
0.0002–0.0004
±0.0001
0.004
Photo-resist
(evaporated metal)
0.001–0.002
±0.00005
0.002
Glue silver
0.00003–0.0002
±0.00005–0.0005
0.002
Black print
0.001
±0.0001
0.005
Emulsion
0.00005–0.0001
±0.00005
0.001
7.12 Cements and Liquids
Optical  cements  are  used  to  fasten  optical  elements  together.  Two
main purposes are served by cementing: the elements are held in accu-
rate  alignment  with  each  other  independent  of  their  mechanical
mount,  and the  reflections from  the surfaces  (especially  those from
TIR; see Sec. 4.6) are largely eliminated by cementing. Ordinarily the
layer  of cement used is extremely thin and its  effect  on the optical
characteristics  of  the  system  can  be  totally  neglected;  some  of  the 
newer plastic cements, designed to withstand extremes of tempera-
ture, are used in thicknesses of a few thousandths of an inch (which
could affect the performance of an optical system under critical condi-
tions where the light rays have large slopes).
Canada balsam is made from the sap of the balsam fir. It is available
in a liquid form (dissolved in xylol) and in stick or solid form. Elements
to be cemented are cleaned and placed together on a hot plate. When
the elements are warm enough to melt the balsam, the stick is rubbed
on the lower element. The upper element is replaced and the excess
cement and any entrapped air bubbles are worked out by oscillating or
rocking the upper element. The elements are then placed in an align-
ment fixture to cool. Balsam cement has an index of refraction of about
1.54  and  a  V-value  of  about  42.  These  are  conveniently  midway
between  the  refractive  characteristics  of  crown  and  flint  glasses.
Unfortunately, Canada balsam will not withstand high or low temper-
atures. It softens when heated and splits at low temperatures and is
thus unsuited for  rigorous thermal  environments.  Balsam is  rarely
used today.
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
213
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete blank page in pdf online; best pdf editor delete pages
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete page in pdf document
Agreat number of plastic cements have been developed to withstand
extremes of both temperature and shock. For the most part, these are
thermosetting  (heat-curing)  or  ultraviolet  light-curing  plastics,
although  a  few  thermoplastic  (heat-softening)  materials  are  used.
Cements are available which will withstand temperatures from 82°C
down to -65°C  without failure when properly  used.  In general  the
thermosetting  cements  are  supplied  in  two  containers  (sometimes
refrigerated), one of which contains a catalyst which is mixed into the
cement prior to use. A drop of cement is placed between the elements
to be cemented, the excess cement and air bubbles are worked out, and
the elements are placed in a fixture or jig for a heating cycle which
cures the cement. Once the cement has set, it is exceedingly difficult
to separate the components; the customary technique is to shock them
apart  by  immersion  in  hot  (150  to  200°C)  castor  oil.  The  index  of
refraction of plastic cements ranges from 1.47 to 1.61, depending on
the type, with most cements falling between 1.53 and 1.58 with a V-
value between 35 and 45. Epoxies and methacrylates are widely used.
Because of the variety of types and characteristics which are available,
one should consult the manufacturer’s literature  for  specific details
regarding any given cement.
Ararely used  method of  fastening  optical elements  together is by
what is called optical contact. Both pieces must be scrupulously cleaned
(often the final cleaning is with a cloth slightly stained with polishing
rouge) and laid together. If the surface shapes match well enough, as the
air is pressed out from between the pieces, a molecular attraction will
cause them to adhere in a surprisingly strong bond, which will with-
stand a force of about 95 lb/in
2
. Usually the only way properly contact-
ed surfaces can be separated is by heating one of them and allowing
thermal  expansion  to break the contact (it often breaks the glass as
well). Occasionally, soaking in water will separate the pieces.
Optical liquids are used primarily for microscope immersion fluids
and for use in index measurement (in critical-angle refractometers).
For microscopy, water (n
d
=1.33), cedar oil (n
d
=1.515), and glycerin
(ultraviolet n = 1.45)  are  frequently  utilized.  For  refractometers
alpha-bromonaphthalene (n = 1.66) is the most commonly used liquid.
Methylene iodide (n = 1.74) is used for high index measurement (since
the liquid index must be larger than that of the sample to avoid total
internal reflection back into the sample).
Bibliography
Note: Titles preceded by an asterisk (*) are out of print.
American Institute of Physics Handbook, 3d ed., New York, McGraw-
Hill, 1972.
214
Chapter Seven
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete blank pages in pdf; delete pages from a pdf document
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
acrobat export pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf
Ballard, S., K. McCarthy, and W. Wolfe, Optical Materials for Infrared
Instrumentation, Univ. of Michigan, 1959 (Supplement, 1961).
Barnes, W., in Shannon and Wyant (eds.), Applied Optics and Optical
Engineering, vol. 7, New York, Academic, 1979 (reflective materials).
Baumeister,  P.,  in  Kingslake  (ed.),  Applied  Optics  and  Optical
Engineering, vol. 1, New York, Academic, 1965 (coatings).
Bennett, J. M., “Polarization,” in Handbook of Optics, vol. 1, New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 5.
Bennett, J. M., “Polarizers,” in Handbook of Optics, vol. 2, New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 3.
Berning, P., in  Hass (ed.), Physics  of Thin Films, vol. 1, New York,
Academic, 1963 (calculations).
*Conrady, A., Applied Optics and Optical Design, Oxford, 1929. (This
and vol. 2 were also published by Dover, New York.)
Dobrowolski,  J.,  “Optical  Properties  of  Films  and  Coatings,”  in
Handbook of Optics, vol. 1, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 42.
Dobrowolski, J., in W. Driscoll (ed.), Handbook of Optics, New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1978 (coatings).
Driscoll, W. (ed.), Handbook of Optics, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1978.
*Hackforth, H., Infrared Radiation, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1960.
Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, Chemical Rubber Publishing Co.,
published annually.
*Hardy,  A.,  and  F.  Perrin,  The  Principles  of  Optics, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1932.
Hass, G., in Kingslake (ed.), Applied Optics and Optical Engineering,
vol. 3, New York, Academic, 1975 (mirror coatings).
*Heavens,  O.,  Optical  Properties  of  Thin  Films, London,
Butterworth’s, 1955.
Herzberger, M., Modern Geometrical Optics, New York, Interscience,
1958.
*Holland, L., Vacuum Deposition of Thin Films, New York, Wiley, 1956.
Jacobs, S., in Shannon and Wyant (eds.), Applied Optics and Optical
Engineering, vol. 10, San Diego, Academic, 1987 (dimensional sta-
bility).
*Jacobs,  D.,  Fundamentals  of  Optical  Engineering, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1943.
Jacobson,  R.,  in  Kingslake  (ed.),  Applied  Optics  and  Optical
Engineering, vol. 1, New York, Academic, 1965 (projection screens).
*Jamieson, J.,  et  al., Infrared  Physics  and  Engineering, New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1963.
Jenkins, F., and H. White, Fundamentals of Optics, 4th ed., New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1976.
Kreidl, N., and J. Rood, in Kingslake (ed.), Applied Optics and Optical
Engineering, vol. 1, New York, Academic, 1965 (materials).
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
215
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete pages in pdf; acrobat extract pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete pdf page acrobat; delete page from pdf online
216
Chapter Seven
Lytle, J. D., “Polymetric Optics,” in Handbook of Optics, vol. 2, New
York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 34.
Macleod, H., in Shannon and Wyant (eds.), Applied Optics and Optical
Engineering, vol. 10, San Diego, Academic, 1987 (coatings).
Macleod, H., Thin Film Optical Filters, 2d ed., New York, McGraw-
Hill, 1988.
Meltzer,  R.,  in  Kingslake  (ed.),  Applied  Optics  and  Optical
Engineering, vol. 1, New York, Academic, 1965 (polarization).
Moore, D. T., “Gradient Index Optics,” in Handbook of Optics, vol. 2,
New York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 9.
Palmer,  J.  M.,  “The  Measurement  of  Transmission,  Absorption,
Emission and Reflection,” in Handbook of Optics, vol. 2, New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 25.
Paquin, R. A., “Properties of Metals,” in Handbook of Optics, vol. 2,
New York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 35.
Parker, C., in Shannon and Wyant (eds.), Applied Optics and Optical
Engineering, vol. 7, New York, Academic, 1979 (refractive materi-
als).
Photonics  Buyers  Guide, Optical  Industry  Directory,  Laurin
Publishers, Pittsfield, MA (published annually).
Pompea,  S.  M.,  and  R.  P.  Breault,  “Black  Surfaces  for  Optical
Systems,” in Handbook of Optics, vol. 2, New York, McGraw-Hill,
1995, Chap. 37.
Rancourt, J., Optical Thin Films, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1987.
Scharf, P., in Kingslake (ed.), Applied Optics and Optical Engineering,
vol. 1, New York, Academic, 1965 (filters).
*Strong, J., Concepts of Classical Optics, New York, Freeman, 1958.
Thelen,  A.,  Design  of  Optical  Interference  Coatings, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1988.
Tropf, W. J., M. Thomas, and T. J. Harris, “Properties of Crystals and
Glasses,” in Handbook  of Optics, vol. 2, New York, McGraw-Hill,
1995, Chap. 33.
*Vasicek, A., Optics of Thin Films, Amsterdam, North Holland, 1960.
Welham, B., in Shannon and Wyant (eds.), Applied Optics and Optical
Engineering, vol. 7, New York, Academic, 1979 (plastics).
Wolfe, W., in W. Driscoll (ed.), Handbook of Optics, New York, McGraw-
Hill, 1978 (materials).
Wolfe,  W.,  in  Wolfe  and  Zissis  (eds.),  The  Infrared  Handbook,
Washington, D.C., Office of Naval Research, 1985 (materials).
Exercises
1 (a) What is the transmission of a stack of three thin plane parallel plates
of glass (n = 1.5) at normal incidence?
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
delete page from pdf file; delete page in pdf file
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete a page from a pdf in preview; add and delete pages in pdf
(b) What percentage of the incident light is transmitted directly (i.e., with-
out any intervening reflections)?
ANSWER
: (a) 80 percent, (b) (0.96)6 = 78 percent
2 If a 1-cm thickness of a material transmits 85 percent and 2-cm thickness
transmits 80 percent, (a) what percentage will a 3-cm thickness transmit? (b)
What is the absorption coefficient of the material? (Neglect all multiple reflec-
tions.)
ANSWER
: (a) 75.3 percent; (b) 0.06062 cm-1
3 Determine the coefficients for the dispersion equations given in Section 7.1
for one of the optical glasses listed in Fig. 7.4. Evaluate the accuracy of the
equations by comparing the index values given by the equations with those
listed in the table (for wavelengths not used in determining the constants).
4 Using the spectral transmission curves of Fig. 7.10, plot the spectral trans-
mission which would result from a combination of filters (c) and (f).
5 Plot, in the manner of Fig. 7.14, the curve of reflection against angle of inci-
dence for a single surface of glass (n = 1.52) coated with a quarter wavelength
thickness of magnesium fluoride (n = 1.38).
Optical Materials and Interface Coatings
217
219
Radiometry
and Photometry
8.1 Introduction
In  concept,  both  radiometry  and  photometry  are  quite  straightfor-
ward; however, both have been cursed with a jungle of often bewilder-
ing  terminology.  Radiometry  deals  with  radiant  energy  (i.e.,
electromagnetic radiation) of any wavelength. Photometry is restrict-
ed to radiation in the visible region of the spectrum. The basic unit of
power (i.e., rate of transfer of energy) in radiometry is the watt; in pho-
tometry, the corresponding unit is the lumen, which is simply radiant
power as modified by the relative spectral sensitivity of the eye (Fig.
5.10) per Eq. 8.18. Note that watts and lumens have the same dimen-
sions, namely energy per time.
All radiometry must take into account the variation of characteris-
tics with wavelength. Examples are the spectral variation of emission,
the variation of transmission of the atmosphere and optics with wave-
length,  and  the  differences  in  detector  and  film  response  with 
wavelength. A convenient way to deal with this is to multiply, wave-
length by wavelength, all such factors together so as to arrive at one
unified spectral weighting function. Thus, all radiometry is spectrally
weighted and it should be apparent that photometry is simply one par-
ticular spectral weighting. See Sec. 8.9.
The principles of radiometry and photometry are readily understood
when one thinks in terms of the basic units involved, rather than the
special terminology which is conventionally used. The next five sec-
tions  will  discuss  radiation  in  terms  of  watts;  the  reader  should
Chapter
8
remember  that  the  discussion  is  equally  valid  for  photometry,  if
lumens are read for watts.
8.2 The Inverse Square Law; Intensity
Consider a hypothetical point (or “sufficiently” small) source of radiant
energy, which is radiating uniformly in all directions. If the rate at
which energy is radiated is P watts, then the source  has  a  radiant
intensity  J of P/4π watts per steradian,*  since the  solid  angle into
which the energy is radiated is a sphere of 4π steradians. Of course
there are no truly “point” sources and no practical sources which radi-
ate uniformly in all directions, but if a source is quite small relative to
its distance, it can be treated as a point, and its radiation, in the direc-
tions in which it does radiate, can be expressed in watts per steradian.
If we now consider a surface which is S cm from the source, then 1
cm
2
of this surface will subtend 1/S
2
steradians from the source (at the
point where the normal from the source to the surface intersects the
surface, if S is large). The irradiance H on this surface is the incident
radiant power per unit area and is obtained by multiplying the inten-
sity of the source in watts per steradian by the solid angle subtended
by the unit area. Thus, the irradiance is given by
H= J
(8.1)
The  units  of  irradiance  are  watts  per  square  centimeter  (W/cm
2
).
Equation 8.1 is, of course, the “inverse square” law, which is conven-
tionally stated: the illumination (irradiance) on a surface is inversely
proportional to the square of the distance from the (point) source.
Thus, if our uniformly radiating point source emits energy at a rate
of 10 W, it will have an intensity J = 10/4π = 0.8 W ster
-1
, and the
radiation falling on a surface 100 cm away would be 0.8 × 10
-4
W/cm
2
,
or 80 μW/cm
2
. If the surface is flat, the irradiance will, of course, be
less than this at points where the radiation is incident at an angle,
since the solid angle subtended by a unit of area in the surface will be
reduced. From Fig. 8.1 it can be seen that the source-to-surface dis-
tance is increased to S/cos θ and that the effective area (normal to the
1
S
2
220
Chapter Eight
*A steradian is the solid angle subtended (from its center) by 1/4π of the surface area
of a sphere. Thus, a sphere subtends 4π (12.566) steradians from its center; a hemi-
sphere subtends 2π steradians. The size of a solid angle in steradians is found by deter-
mining the area of that portion of the surface of a sphere which is included within the
solid angle and dividing this area by the square of the radius of the sphere. For a small
solid angle, the area of the included flat surface normal to the “central axis” of the angle
can be divided by the square of the distance from the surface to the apex of the angle to
determine its size in steradians. One can visualize a steradian as a cone with an apex
angle of about 65.5°, or 3283 square degrees.
direction of the radiation) is reduced by a cos θ factor. Thus, the solid
angle subtended, and the irradiance, are reduced by a cos
3
θfactor.
8.3 Radiance and Lambert’s Law
An  extended  source,  that is,  one  whose dimensions  are significant,
must be treated differently than a point source. A small area of the
source will radiate a certain amount of power per unit of solid angle.
Thus,  the  radiation  characteristics  of  an  extended  source  are
expressed in terms of power per unit solid angle per unit area. This is
called radiance; the usual units for radiance are watts per steradian
per square centimeter (W ster
-1
cm
-2
) and the symbol is N. Note that
the area is measured normal to the direction of radiation, not in the
radiating surface.
Most extended sources of radiation follow, at least approximately,
what is known as Lambert’s law of intensity,
J
θ
=J
0
cos
θ
(8.2)
where J
θ
is the intensity of a small incremental area of the source in a
direction at an angle θ from the normal to the surface, and J
0
is the
intensity of the incremental area in the direction of the normal. For
example, a heated metal disk with a total area of 1 cm
2
and a radiance
of 1 W ster
-1
cm
-2
will radiate 1 W/ster in a direction normal to its sur-
face. In a direction 45° to the normal, it will radiate only 0.707 W/ster
(cos 45° = 0.707).
Notice that although radiance is given in terms of watts per stera-
dian per square centimeter, this should not be taken to mean that the
radiation is uniform over a full steradian or over a full square cen-
timeter. Consider a source consisting of a 0.1-cm square incandescent
Radiometry and Photometry
221
Figure 8.1
Geometry  of  a point
source  irradiating  a  plane,
showing that irradiance (or illu-
mination) varies with cos
3
θ.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested