c# open a pdf file : Delete page pdf file software Library dll winforms asp.net windows web forms smith_modern_optical_engineering24-part124

filament in a 20-cm-diameter envelope. Assume that the bulb is paint-
ed so that only a 1-cm square transmits energy, and that the source
radiates one-fiftieth of a watt through this square. (We assume, for
convenience, that the radiation intercepted by the painted envelope is
thereby totally removed from consideration.) Now the filament has an
area of 0.01 cm
2
and is radiating 0.02 W into a solid angle of (approx-
imately) 0.01 steradian. Therefore, it has a radiance of 200 W ster
-1
cm
-2
 but  only  within  the  solid  angle  subtended  by  the  window!
Outside this angle the radiance is zero. This concept of radiance over
a  limited  angle becomes  important in  dealing with  the  radiance  of
images and must be thoroughly understood.
There are several interesting consequences of  Lambert’s law that
are worthy of consideration, not only for their own sake but because
they illustrate the basic techniques of radiometric calculations. The
radiance of a surface is conventionally taken with respect to the area of
a surface  normal  to the  direction  of radiation. It  can  be  seen  that,
although  the  emitted  radiation  per  steradian  falls  off  with  cos  θ
according  to  Lambert’s  law,  the “projected” surface area  falls  off at
exactly the same rate. The result is that the radiance of a Lambertian
surface is constant with respect to θ. In visual work the quantity corre-
sponding to radiance is brightness, and the above is readily demon-
strated by observing that the brightness of a diffuse source is the same
regardless of the angle from which it is viewed.
8.4 Radiation into a Hemisphere
Let us determine the total power radiated from a flat diffuse source
into a hemisphere. If the source has a radiance of N W ster
-1
cm
-2
, one
might expect that the power radiated into a hemisphere of 2π steradi-
ans would be 2πN W/cm
2
. That this is twice too large is readily shown.
With reference to Fig. 8.2, let A represent the area of a small source
with a radiance of N W ster
-1
cm
-2
and an intensity of J
θ
=J
0
cos θ =
NA cos θ W/ster. The incremental ring area on a hemisphere of radius
Rhas an area of 2πR sin θ ̇ R dθ and thus subtends (from A) a solid
angle of 2πR
2
sin θ dθ/R
2
=2π sin θ dθ steradians. The radiation inter-
cepted by this ring is the product of the intensity of the source and the
solid angle, or
dP = J
θ
2π sin θ d
θ
=2πNA sin θ cos θ d
θ
(8.3)
Integrating to find the total power radiated into the hemisphere from
A, we get
P=
π/2
0
2πNA sin θ cos θ d
θ
=2πNA
π/2
0
=πNA watts (8.4)
sin
2
θ
2
222
Chapter Eight
Delete page pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
add and delete pages in pdf online; delete blank pages from pdf file
Delete page pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf in preview
Dividing by A to get watts emitted per square centimeter of source,
we find the radiation into the 2π steradian of the hemisphere to be
πN W/cm
2
, not 2πN. This is the basic relationship between radiance
and the power emitted from the surface.
8.5 Irradiance Produced by a Diffuse
Source
It is frequently of interest to determine the irradiance produced at a
point  by  a  lambertian  source  of  finite  size.  Referring  to  Fig.  8.3,
assume that the source is a circular disk of radius R and that we wish
to determine the irradiance at some point X which is a distance S from
the source and is on the normal through the center of the source. (Note
that we will determine the irradiance on a plane parallel to the plane
of the source.) The radiant intensity of a small element of area dA in
the direction of point X is given by Eq. 8.2 as
J
θ
=J
0
cos θ = N dA cos θ
where N is the radiance of the source. Since the distance from dA to X
is S/cos θ, and the radiation arrives at an angle θ, the incremental irra-
diance at X produced by dA is
dH = J
0
cos θ 
=
(8.5)
The same irradiance is produced by each incremental area making up
a ring of radius r and a width dr, so that we can substitute the area of
the ring, 2πr dr, for dA in Eq. 8.5 to get the incremental irradiance
from the ring.
dH =
(8.6)
2πr dr N cos
4
θ

S
2
N dA cos
4
θ

S
2
cos
3
θ
S
2
Radiometry and Photometry
223
Figure 8.2
Geometry of a lambertian
source radiating into a hemisphere.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete page pdf acrobat reader; delete pdf pages android
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages in pdf online
To simplify the integration, we substitute
r= S tan θ
dr = S sec
2
θd
θ
into Eq. 8.6 to get
dH =
=2πN tan θ cos
2
θd
θ
=2πN sin θ cos θ d
θ
Integrating to determine the irradiance from the entire source, we get
H=
θ
0
2πN sin θ cos θ d
θ
=2πN
 
θ
0
H= πN sin
2
θ
m
2
watt/cm
2
(8.7)
where H is the irradiance produced at a point by a circular source of
radiance N W ster
-1
cm
-2
which subtends an angle of 2θ
m
from the
point (when the point is on the “axis” of the source). Note well that θ
m
is the angle defined by the source diameter.
Unfortunately noncircular sources do not readily yield to analysis.
However, small noncircular sources may be approximated with a fair
degree  of accuracy by noting that the solid angle subtended by  the
source from X is
= 2π (1 - cos θ) = 2π
and for small values of θ, cos θ approaches unity and
= π sin
2
θ
sin
2
θ

(1 + cos θ)
sin
2
θ
2
2πS tan θS sec
2
θd
θ
Ncos
4
θ

S
2
224
Chapter Eight
Figure 8.3
Geometry of a circu-
lar source irradiating point X.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete pages of pdf online; delete pages on pdf file
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
delete pages in pdf reader; delete page from pdf document
Thus, if the angle subtended by the source is moderate, we can substi-
tute into Eq. 8.7 and write
H= N
(8.8)
If the point X does not lie on the “axis” (the normal through the cen-
ter of the circular source), then the irradiance would be subject to the
same factors outlined in the discussion of the “cosine-fourth” rule in
Sec. 6.7. Thus, if the line from the point X
to the center of the circle
makes an angle  to the normal, the irradiance at X
is given by
H
=H
0
cos
4
(8.9)
where H
0
is the irradiance along the normal given by Eq. 8.7 or 8.8 and
H
is the irradiance at X
(measured in a plane parallel to the source).
(See the note in Example A regarding the inaccuracy  of the cosine-
fourth rule when the angles θ and  are large.)
It is apparent that Eqs. 8.8 and 8.9 may be used in combination to
calculate the irradiance produced by any conceivable source config-
uration,  to  whatever  degree  of  accuracy  that  time  (or  patience)
allows.
8.6 The Radiometry of Images; 
The Conservation of Radiance
When a source is imaged by an optical system, the image has a radi-
ance,  and  it  may  be  treated  as  a  secondary  source  of  radiation.
However, one must always keep in mind that the radiance of an image
differs from the radiance of an ordinary source in that the radiance of
an image exists only within the solid angle subtended from the image
by the clear aperture of the optical system. Outside of this angle, the
radiance of the image is zero.
Figure 8.4 illustrates an aplanatic optical system imaging an incre-
mental area A of a lambertian source at A′. We will consider the radi-
ance of the image at A′ formed through a generalized incremental area
Pin the principal surface of the optical system. (Since the system is
aplanatic, that is, free of coma and spherical aberration, the principal
“planes”  are  spherical  surfaces  and  are  centered  on  the  object  and
image.) The radiance of the source is N W ster
-1
cm
-2
and the projected
area of A in the direction θ is A cos θ cm
2
. The solid angle subtended by
incremental area P from A is P/S
2
, where S is the distance from the
object to the first principal surface. Therefore, the radiant power inter-
cepted by area P is
Power = N 
Acos θ watts
P
S
2
Radiometry and Photometry
225
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete page on pdf file; delete pages pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
This radiation is imaged by the optical system at area A′, into a (pro-
jected) area A′ cos θ′, through a solid angle P′/S′
2
. Thus, the radiance
at A′ is given by
N′ = TN 
Acos θ
watt ster
-1
cm
-2
where T is the transmission of the optical system. Now we note that
the incremental areas A and A′ are related by the laws of first-order
optics,  and,  if  both  are  in  media  of  the  same  index,  AS′
2
 A′S
2
.
Further, the principal surfaces are unit images of each other; taking
the tilts of the surfaces into account, we get P cos θ = P′ cos θ′. Making
these substitutions and clearing, we find that the radiance of the image
is equal to that of the object times the transmission of the system, or
N′ = TN
(8.10)
This fundamental relationship can be restated with slightly different
emphasis: the radiance of an image cannot exceed that of the object.*
S′
2

P′A′ cos θ′
P
S
2
226
Chapter Eight
*This statement and Eqs. 8.10 and 8.11 are subject to the condition that both object
and image lie in media of the same index of refraction. When the media have different
indices, the image radiance and irradiance are multiplied by the factor (n
i
/n
0
)
2
, where
n
i
and n
0
are the refractive indices of the image media and object media, respectively.
Thus, Eqs. 8.10 and 8.11 become
N′ = TN
 
2
(8.10a)
H= TN
 
2
πsin
2
θ′
= TN
 
2
(8.11a)
The factor (n
i
/n
0
) is introduced by the use of An
0
2
S′
2
=A′n
i
2
S
2
in place of AS′
2
=A′S
2
in the derivation of Eq. 8.10; both equalities are derived from the optical invariant rela-
tionship hnu = h′n′u′ (Eq. 2.55).
n
i
n
0
n
i
n
0
n
i
n
0
Figure 8.4
Illustrates an  aplanatic  optical  system  imaging an
incremental source area A atA′.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
The VB.NET PDF document splitter control provides VB.NET developers an easy to use solution that they can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page
cut pages from pdf online; delete pages pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete page on pdf document; delete pages of pdf preview
At first  consideration the conservation of  radiance (or brightness)
seems quite counterintuitive. Ordinarily, the solid angle of radiation
accepted by an optical system from a source is quite small, as is the
fraction of the total power which passes through the lens and forms
the image. It is difficult to accept that the image formed by this small
fraction of the source power will have the same radiance as does the
source.  We  can  easily  demonstrate  this,  using  only  the  first-order
optics from Chap. 2.
Let us assume  a  small  source  of radiance  N with an  area A. The
source thus has an intensity of AN. The source is imaged by an optical
system with an area P which is located a distance Sfrom the source. The
solid angle subtended by the lens from the source is thus P/S
2
, and the
power intercepted by the lens and formed into the image is ANP/S
2
.
The lens will form an image with a magnification M, and the area of
the image will thus be AM
2
. The image distance will be MS, and the
solid angle subtended by the lens from the image will be P/M
2
S
2
ster.
Thus the power in the image (ANP/S
2
) is spread over the image area
(AM
2
) and exists only over the solid angle (P/M
2
S
2
). The image radi-
ance is power per unit area per solid angle; combining the expressions
above, we get (neglecting any transmission losses)
Image radiance = power/area ̇ solid angle
=(ANP/S
2
) / (AM
2
) (P/M
2
S
2
)
We can cancel A, P, S, and M, leaving us with
Image radiance = N (the object radiance)
which is a statement of the conservation of radiance (or brightness).
By the application of exactly the same integration technique used in
Sec. 8.5, it can be shown that the irradiance produced in the plane of
an image is given by
H= T
π
Nsin
2
θ′ watt/cm
-2
=TN
(for small angles)  (8.11)
where T is the system transmission, N (W ster
-1
cm
-2
) is the object
radiance, and θ′ is the half angle subtended by the exit pupil of the
optical system from the image. Small or noncircular exit pupils and
cylindrical lens systems can be handled by substituting the solid angle
for π sin
2
θ′ (just as in Eq. 8.8); image points off the optical axis are
subject  to  the  cosine-fourth  law  in  addition  to  any  losses  due  to
vignetting (Eq. 8.9 and Sec. 6.7).
The similarity between the equations for the irradiance produced by
a  diffuse source and by an optical system  makes  it apparent  that,
when it is viewed from the image point, the aperture of the optical 
system takes on the radiance of the object it is imaging. This is an
Radiometry and Photometry
227
extremely useful concept; for radiometric purposes, a complex optical
system can often be treated as if it consisted solely of a transmission
loss and an exit pupil with the same radiance as the object. Similarly,
when an optical system produces an image of a source, the image can
be treated as a new source of the same radiance (less transmission
losses).  Of  course,  the  direction  that  radiation  is  emitted  from  the
image is limited by the aperture of the system.
When an object is so small that its image is a diffraction pattern (Airy
disk), then the preceding techniques, which apply to extended sources,
cannot be used. Instead, the power intercepted by the optical system,
reduced by transmission losses, is spread into the diffraction pattern. To
determine the irradiance (or the radiance) of the image, we note that 84
percent of the power intercepted and transmitted by the lens is concen-
trated into the central bright spot (the Airy disk). A precise determina-
tion  of  irradiance  requires  that  one  integrate  the  relative
irradiance-times-area product over the central disk and equate this to 84
percent of the image power. If P is the total power in the Airy pattern, H
0
the irradiance at the center of the pattern, and z the radius of the first
dark ring, a numerical integration of Eq. 6.18 over the central disk yields
0.84P = 0.72H
0
z
2
Rearranging and substituting the value of z given by Eq. 6.20, we get
H
0
=1.17
=πP
 
2
where  is the wavelength and NA is n′ sin U′, the numerical aperture.
The irradiance for points not at the center of the pattern is then found
by Eq. 6.18. Note that the preceding assumes a circular aperture; for
rectangular apertures, the process would be based on Eq. 6.16.
Example A
In Fig. 8.5, A is a circular source with a radiance of 10 W per ster per cm
2
radiating toward plane BC. The diameter of A subtends 60° from point
B. The distance AB is 100 cm and the distance BC is 100 cm. An optical
system at D forms an image of the region about point C at E. Plane BC
is a diffuse (lambertian) reflector with a reflectivity of 70 percent. The
optical system (D) has a 1-in-square aperture and the distance from D to
Eis 100 in. The transmission of the optical system is 80 percent. We wish
to determine the power incident on a 1-cm square photodetector at E.
We begin  by  determining  the irradiance  at  B, using Eq.  8.7;  the
source radiance is 10 W ster
-1
cm
-2
and the half angle θ is 30°, giving
H
B
=πN sin
2
θ= π ̇ 10 ̇
 
2
=7.85 W/cm
2
1
2
NA
P
z
2
228
Chapter Eight
Since angle BAC is 45°, we can find the irradiance at C from Eq. 8.9,
noting that cos 45° is 0.707
H
C
=H
B
cos
4
45° = 7.85 × (0.707)
4
=1.96 W/cm
2
(Note  that the  cosine-fourth  effect derived  in Sec.  6.7  included one
cosine term which was approximate; its accuracy depended on the dis-
tance from the pupil to the image surface being much larger than the
pupil  diameter.  In  Example A this  approximation  is  quite  poor.  P.
Foote, in the Bulletin of the Bureau of Standards 12, 583 (1915), gave
the following  expression  for the  irradiance,  which is  accurate  even
when the source is large compared with the distance.
H=
1-
If we compare the irradiance from this equation with that from Eqs.
8.7 and 8.8 for the angles  and θ from Example A, we find that this
irradiance is 42 percent greater than the cosine-fourth result. This is,
of course, a rather extreme case.)
It is now necessary to determine the radiance of the surface at C.
The diffuse surface at C reradiates 70 percent of the incident 1.96
W/cm
2
into a  full hemisphere; the total power  reradiated  is  thus
1.37 W/cm
2
. In Sec. 8.4 it was shown that a source of radiance N
radiated πN W/cm
2
into a hemisphere. Thus the radiance at point C
is given by
(1 + tan
2
- tan
2
θ)

[tan
4
+ 2 tan
2
(1 - tan
2
θ) + 1/cos
4
θ]
1/2
πN
2
Radiometry and Photometry
229
Figure 8.5
Example A.
N
C
=
=
=
=0.44 W ster
-1
cm
-2
The irradiance at E can now be determined from Eq. 8.11, noting that
the  solid  angle  subtended  by  the  aperture  of  the  lens  system  is
1/(100)
2
, or 10
-4
ster, and substituting this for π sin
2
θin Eq. 8.11,
H
E
=T
D
πN
C
sin
2
θ= T
D
N
C
=0.8 × 0.44 × 10
-4
=0.35 × 10
-4
W/cm
2
Since the photodetector at E has an area of 1 cm
2
, the radiant power
falling on it is just 0.35 × 10
-4
W, or 35 μW.
8.7 Spectral Radiometry
In the preceding discussion, no mention has been made of the spectral
characteristics  of  the  radiation.  It  is  apparent  that  every  radiant
source has some sort of spectral distribution of its radiation, in that it
will emit more radiation at certain wavelengths than others.
For many purposes, it is necessary to treat intensity (J), irradiance
(H), radiance (N), etc. (in fact, all the quantities listed in Fig. 8.6) as
functions of wavelength. To do this we refer to the above quantities per
unit interval of wavelength. Thus, if a source emits 5 W of  radiant
power in the spectral band between 2 and 2.1 μm, it emits 50 W per
micrometer (W/μm) in this region of the spectrum. The standard sym-
bol for this type of quantity is the symbol given in Fig. 8.6 subscripted
with a , and the name is preceded by “spectral.” For example, the
symbol for spectral radiance is N
and its units are watts per steradi-
an per square centimeter per micrometer (W ster
-1
cm
-2
μm
-1
).
1.37
π
0.7 × 1.96

π
RH
π
230
Chapter Eight
Figure 8.6
Radiometric terminology. The names, symbols, descriptions, and preferred
units for quantities in radiometric work.
In many applications it is absolutely necessary to take the spectral
characteristics of sources, detectors, optical systems, filters, and the like
into account. This is accomplished by integrating the particular radia-
tion product function over an appropriate wavelength interval. Since
most spectral characteristics are not ordinary functions, the process of
integration is usually numerical, and thus laborious. As a brief example,
suppose that the irradiance in an image is desired. The spectral radi-
ance  of  the  object  can  be  described  by  some  function  N()  and  the
transmission of the atmosphere, the optical system, and any filters can
be combined in a spectral transmission function T(). Equation 8.11 will
give the irradiance of the image (for any given wavelength); for use over
an extended wavelength interval, we must write
H=
2
1
T() πN() sin
2
θd
=π sin
2
θ
2
1
T() N () d
W/cm
2
(8.12)
where 
1
and 
2
, the limits of the integration, may be zero and infini-
ty, but are usually taken as real wavelengths which encompass the
region of interest. In practice, it is usually necessary to perform the
integration numerically; this process is represented (for this particu-
lar example) by the summation:
H= π sin
2
θ
2
 = 
1
T() N() ∆ W/cm
2
(8.13)
The spectral response of a detector is included in a calculation in the
same manner. For example, the effective power falling on a detector
with  an area  of  A and a  relative  spectral  response R(),  when  the
detector is located in the image plane of the system above, would be
(provided that the image completely covered the detector)
P= A
π
sin
2
θ
2
1
R() T() N() d
W
8.8 Blackbody Radiation
Aperfect blackbody is one which totally absorbs all radiation incident
upon it. The radiation characteristics of a heated blackbody are subject
to known laws, and since it is possible to build a close approximation to
an ideal blackbody, a device of this type is a very useful standard source
for the calibration and testing of radiometric instruments. Further, most
sources of thermal radiation, i.e., sources which radiate because they are
heated, radiate energy in a manner which can be readily described in
terms of a blackbody emitting through a filter, making it possible to
use the blackbody radiation laws as a starting point for many radio-
metric calculations.
Radiometry and Photometry
231
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested