c# open a pdf file : Delete page on pdf software SDK project winforms wpf asp.net UWP The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation14-part1240

came before me, sombre in the gloom,
and others gathered round, all who were with him
when death and doom struck in Aegísthos’ hall.
430
Sipping the black blood, the tall shade perceived me,
and cried out sharply, breaking into tears;
then tried to stretch his hands toward me, but could not,
being bereft of all the reach and power
he once felt in the great torque of his arms.
Gazing at him, and stirred, I wept for pity,
and spoke across to him:
‘O son of Atreus,
illustrious Lord Marshal, Agamémnon,
what was the doom that brought you low in death?
Were you at sea, aboard ship, and Poseidon
440
blew up a wicked squall to send you under,
or were you cattle-raiding on the mainland
or in a fight for some strongpoint, or women,
when the foe hit you to your mortal hurt?’
But he replied at once:
‘Son of Laërtês,
Odysseus, master of land ways and sea ways,
neither did I go down with some good ship
in any gale Poseidon blew, nor die
upon the mainland, hurt by foes in battle.
It was Aigísthos who designed my death,
450
he and my heartless wife,18 and killed me, after
feeding me, like an ox felled at the trough.
That was my miserable end—and with me
my fellows butchered, like so many swine
killed for some troop, or feast, or wedding banquet
in a great landholder’s household. In your day
you have seen men, and hundreds, die in war,
in the bloody press, or downed in single combat, 
but these were murders you would catch your breath at:
think of us fallen, all our throats cut, winebowl
460
brimming, tables laden on every side,
while blood ran smoking over the whole floor.
In my extremity I heard Kassandra,19
Priam’s daughter, piteously crying
as the traitress Klytaimnéstra made to kill her
along with me. I heaved up from the ground
and got my hands around the blade, but she
18
In Agamémnon’s version here, his wife (as in Aeschylus’ Oresteia) bears a greater respon-
sibility for the murder than in the version outlined in Book IV.
19
A Trojan princess and prophetess. Agamémnon brought her home from Troy as a slave.
Also spelled Cassandra.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eleven
413
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 413
Delete page on pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf preview; copy pages from pdf to word
Delete page on pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf file; delete pdf pages
eluded me, that whore. Nor would she close
my two eyes
20
as my soul swam to the underworld
or shut my lips. There is no being more fell,
470
more bestial than a wife in such an action,
and what an action that one planned!
The murder of her husband and her lord.
Great god, I thought my children and my slaves
at least would give me welcome. But that woman,
plotting a thing so low, defiled herself
and all her sex, all women yet to come,
even those few who may be virtuous.’
He paused then, and I answered:
‘Foul and dreadful.
That was the way that Zeus who views the wide world
480
vented his hatred on the sons of Atreus—
intrigues of women, even from the start.
Myriads
died by Helen’s fault, and Klytaimnéstra
plotted against you half the world away.’
And he at once said:
‘Let it be a warning
even to you. Indulge a woman never,
and never tell her all you know. Some things
a man may tell, some he should cover up.
Not that I see a risk for you, Odysseus,
of death at your wife’s hands. She is too wise,
490
too clear-eyed, sees alternatives too well,
Penélopê, Ikários’ daughter—
that young bride whom we left behind—think of it!—
when we sailed off to war. The baby boy
still cradled at her breast—now he must be
a grown man, and a lucky one. By heaven,
you’ll see him yet, and he’ll embrace his father
with old fashioned respect, and rightly.
My own
lady never let me glut my eyes
on my own son, but bled me to death first.
500
One thing I will advise, on second thought;
stow it away and ponder it.
Land your ship
in secret on your island; give no warning.
The day of faithful wives is gone forever.
20
That is, she would not perform the customary funeral rites.
414
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 414
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete page pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
cut pages out of pdf; delete pages in pdf online
But tell me, have you any word at all
about my son’s
21
life? Gone to Orkhómenos
or sandy Pylos, can he be? Or waiting
with Meneláos in the plain of Sparta?
Death on earth has not yet taken Orestês.’
But I could only answer:
‘Son of Atreus
510
why do you ask these questions of me? Neither
news of home have I, nor news of him,
alive or dead. And empty words are evil.’
So we exchanged our speech, in bitterness,
weighed down by grief, and tears welled in our eyes,
when there appeared the spirit of Akhilleus,
son of Peleus; then Patróklos’ shade,
and then Antílokhos, and then Aias,
first among all the Danaans in strength
and bodily beauty, next to prince Akhilleus.
520
Now that great runner, grandson of Aíakhos,
recognized me and called across to me:
‘Son of Laërtês and the gods of old,
Odysseus, master mariner and soldier,
old knife, what next? What greater feat remains
for you to put your mind on, after this?
How did you find your way down to the dark
where these dimwitted dead are camped forever,
the after images of used-up men?’
I answered:
‘Akhilleus, Peleus’ son, strongest of all
530
among the Akhaians, I had need of foresight
such as Teirêsias alone could give
to help me, homeward bound for the crags of Ithaka.
I have not yet coasted Akhaia, not yet
touched my land; my life is all adversity.
But was there ever a man more blest by fortune
than you, Akhilleus? Can there ever be?
We ranked you with immortals in your lifetime,
we Argives did, and here your power is royal
among the dead men’s shades. Think, then, Akhilleus:
540
you need not be so pained by death.’
To this
he answered swiftly:
21
Agamémnon asks about Orestês, who avenged his father’s murder.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eleven
415
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 415
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
best pdf editor delete pages; delete blank pages in pdf files
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages on pdf online; delete pages on pdf
‘Let me hear no smooth talk
of death from you, Odysseus, light of councils.
Better, I say, to break sod as a farm hand
for some poor country man, on iron rations,
than lord it over all the exhausted dead.
Tell me, what news of the prince my son:22 did he
come after me to make a name in battle
or could it be he did not? Do you know
if rank and honor still belong to Peleus23
550
in the towns of the Myrmidons? Or now, may be,
Hellas and Phthia
24
spurn him, seeing old age
fetters him, hand and foot. I cannot help him
under the sun’s rays, cannot be that man
I was on Troy’s wide seaboard, in those days
when I made bastion for the Argives
and put an army’s best men in the dust.
Were I but whole again, could I go now
to my father’s house, one hour would do to make
my passion and my hands no man could hold
560
hateful to any who shoulder him aside.’
Now when he paused I answered:
‘Of all that—
of Peleus’ life, that is—I know nothing;
but happily I can tell you the whole story
of Neoptólemos, as you require.
In my own ship I brought him out from Skyros
to join the Akhaians under arms.
And I can tell you,
in every council before Troy thereafter
your son spoke first and always to the point;
no one but Nestor and I could out-debate him.
570
And when we formed against the Trojan line
he never hung back in the mass, but ranged
far forward of his troops—no man could touch him
for gallantry. Aye, scores went down before him
in hard fights man to man. I shall not tell
all about each, or name them all—the long
roster of enemies he put out of action,
taking the shock of charges on the Argives.
But what a champion his lance ran through
in Eur´ypulos
25
the son of Télephos! Keteians
580
in throngs around that captain also died—
22
Neoptólemos, or Pyrrhus, who was brought to the Trojan War after his father’s death
and killed Priam, the Trojan king.
23
Akhilleus’ father.
24
Greece and Peleus’ kingdom.
25
Leader of a force persuaded to join the war in support of the Trojans.
416
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 416
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete blank page from pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete pages pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf file
all because Priam’s gifts had won his mother
to send the lad to battle; and I thought
Memnon alone in splendor ever outshone him.
But one fact more: while our picked Argive crew
still rode that hollow horse Epeios built,
and when the whole thing lay with me, to open
the trapdoor of the ambuscade or not,
at that point our Danaan lords and soldiers
wiped their eyes, and their knees began to quake,
590
all but Neoptólemos. I never saw
his tanned cheek change color or his hand
brush one tear away. Rather he prayed me,
hand on hilt, to sortie, and he gripped
his tough spear, bent on havoc for the Trojans.
And when we had pierced and sacked Priam’s tall city
he loaded his choice plunder and embarked
with no scar on him; not a spear had grazed him
nor the sword’s edge in close work—common wounds
one gets in war. Arês in his mad fits
600
knows no favorites.’
But I said no more,
for he had gone off striding the field of asphodel,26
the ghost of our great runner, Akhilleus Aiákidês,
glorying in what I told him of his son.
Now other souls of mournful dead stood by,
each with his troubled questioning, but one
remained alone, apart: the son of Télamon,
Aîas, it was—the great shade burning still27
because I had won favor on the beachhead
in rivalry over Akhilleus’ arms.
610
The Lady Thetis, mother of Akhilleus,
laid out for us the dead man’s battle gear,
and Trojan children, with Athena,
named the Danaan fittest to own them. Would
god I had not borne the palm that day!
For earth took Aîas then to hold forever,
the handsomest and, in all feats of war,
noblest of the Danaans after Akhilleus.
Gently therefore I called across to him:
‘Aîas, dear son of royal Télamon,
620
you would not then forget, even in death,
26
A flower, possibly a variety of narcissus.
27
After the death of Akhilleus, the “greater” Aîas (Ajax) and Odysseus had been rival claimants
for Akhilleus’ weapons; when the arms were awarded to Odysseus, Aîas killed himself.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eleven
417
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 417
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
cut pages out of pdf online; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete page pdf acrobat reader
your fury with me over those accurst
calamitous arms?—and so they were, a bane
sent by the gods upon the Argive host.
For when you died by your own hand we lost
a tower, formidable in war. All we Akhaians
mourn you forever, as we do Akhilleus;
and no one bears the blame but Zeus.
He fixed that doom for you because he frowned
on the whole expedition of our spearmen.
630
My lord, come nearer, listen to our story!
Conquer your indignation and your pride.’
But he gave no reply, and turned away,
following other ghosts toward Erebos.
Who knows if in that darkness he might still
have spoken, and I answered?
But my heart
longed, after this, to see the dead elsewhere.
And now there came before my eyes Minos,
the son of Zeus, enthroned, holding a golden staff,
dealing out justice among ghostly pleaders
640
arrayed about the broad doorways of Death.
And then I glimpsed Orion, the huge hunter,
gripping his club, studded with bronze, unbreakable,
with wild beasts he had overpowered in life
on lonely mountainsides, now brought to bay
on fields of asphodel.
And I saw Títyos,
the son of Gaia, lying
abandoned over nine square rods of plain.
Vultures, hunched above him, left and right,
rifling his belly, stabbed into the liver,
650
and he could never push them off.
This hulk
had once committed rape of Zeus’s mistress,
Lêto, in her glory, when she crossed
the open grass of Panopeus toward Pytho.
Then I saw Tántalos
28
put to the torture:
in a cool pond he stood, lapped round by water
clear to the chin, and being athirst he burned
to slake his dry weasand
29
with drink, though drink
he would not ever again. For when the old man
28
The sin for which Tántalos (Tantalus) is being punished here is uncertain—possibly it
is for revealing the gods’ secrets, possibly for his serving his son’s flesh to the gods (see the
headnote to Aeschylus’ Oresteia).
29
Throat.
418
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 418
put his lips down to the sheet of water
660
it vanished round his feet, gulped underground,
and black mud baked there in a wind from hell.
Boughs, too, drooped low above him, big with fruit,
pear trees, pomegranates, brilliant apples,
luscious figs, and olives ripe and dark;
but if he stretched his hand for one, the wind
under the dark sky tossed the bough beyond him.
Then Sísyphos30 in torment I beheld
being roustabout to a tremendous boulder.
Leaning with both arms braced and legs driving,
670
he heaved it toward a height, and almost over,
but then a Power spun him round and sent
the cruel boulder bounding again to the plain.
Whereon the man bent down again to toil,
dripping sweat, and the dust rose overhead.
Next I saw manifest the power of Heraklês—
a phantom,31 this, for he himself has gone
feasting amid the gods, reclining soft
with Hêbê of the ravishing pale ankles,
daughter of Zeus and Hêra, shod in gold.
680
But, in my vision, all the dead around him
cried like affrighted birds; like Night itself
he loomed with naked bow and nocked arrow
and glances terrible as continual archery.
My hackles rose at the gold swordbelt he wore
sweeping across him: gorgeous intaglio
of savage bears, boars, lions with wildfire eyes,
swordfights, battle, slaughter, and sudden death—
the smith who had that belt in him, I hope
he never made, and never will make, another.
690
The eyes of the vast figure rested on me,
and of a sudden he said in kindly tones:
‘Son of Laërtês and the gods of old,
Odysseus, master mariner and soldier,
under a cloud, you too? Destined to grinding
labors like my own in the sunny world?
Son of Kroníon Zeus or not, how many
days I sweated out, being bound in servitude
to a man far worse than I, a rough master!32
He made me hunt this place one time
700
to get the watchdog of the dead: no more
30
A Corinthian ruler, noted during his lifetime for cunning treachery. More commonly spelled
Sisyphus.
31
Heraklês, or Hercules, was taken to heaven after his death. He was thereafter wedded
to the goddess Hêbê.
32
Eurystheus, in whose service Heraklês was forced to perform many superhumanly diffi-
cult feats, including the capture of Cerberus, the dog who guarded the realm of the dead.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eleven
419
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 419
perilous task, he thought, could be; but I
brought back that beast, up from the underworld;
Hermês and grey-eyed Athena showed the way.’
And Heraklês, down the vistas of the dead,
faded from sight; but I stood fast, awaiting
other great souls who perished in times past.
I should have met, then, god-begotten Theseus
and Peirithoös,33 whom both I longed to see,
but first came shades in thousands, rustling
710
in a pandemonium of whispers, blown together,
and the horror took me that Perséphonê
had brought from darker hell some saurian death’s head.34
I whirled then, made for the ship, shouted to crewmen
to get aboard and cast off the stern hawsers,
an order soon obeyed. They took their thwarts,
and the ship went leaping toward the stream of Ocean
first under oars, then with a following wind.
BOOK TWELVE: SEA PERILS AND DEFEAT
The ship sailed on, out of the Ocean Stream,
riding a long swell on the open sea
for the Island of Aiaia.
Summering Dawn
has dancing grounds there, and the Sun his rising;1
but still by night we beached on a sand shelf
and waded in beyond the line of breakers
to fall asleep, awaiting the Day Star.
When the young Dawn with finger tips of rose
made heaven bright, I sent shipmates to bring
Elpênor’s body from the house of Kirkê.
10
We others cut down timber on the foreland,
on a high point, and built his pyre of logs,
then stood by weeping while the flame burnt through
corse and equipment.
Then we heaped his barrow,
lifting a gravestone on the mound, and fixed
his light but unwarped oar against the sky.
These were our rites in memory of him. Soon, then,
knowing us back from the Dark Land, Kirkê came
freshly adorned for us, with handmaids bearing
loaves, roast meats, and ruby-colored wine.
20
33
A friend of Theseus.
34
Reptilian specter.
1
Aiaia is distinguished from the sunless land of the dead which they have just left behind.
420
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 420
She stood among us in immortal beauty 
jesting:
‘Hearts of oak, did you go down
alive into the homes of Death? One visit
finishes all men but yourselves, twice mortal!
Come, here is meat and wine, enjoy your feasting
for one whole day; and in the dawn tomorrow
you shall put out to sea. Sailing directions,
landmarks, perils, I shall sketch for you, to keep you
from being caught by land or water
in some black sack of trouble.’
In high humor
30
and ready for carousal, we agreed;
so all that day until the sun went down
we feasted on roast meat and good red wine,
till after sunset, at the fall of night,
the men dropped off to sleep by the stern hawsers.
She took my hand then, silent in the hush,
drew me apart, made me sit down, and lay
beside me, softly questioning, as I told
all I had seen, from first to last.
Then said the Lady Kirkê:
‘So: all those trials are over.
Listen with care
40
to this, now, and a god will arm your mind.
Square in your ship’s path are Seirênês,2 crying
beauty to bewitch men coasting by;
woe to the innocent who hears that sound!
He will not see his lady nor his children
in joy, crowding about him, home from sea;
the Seirênês will sing his mind away
on their sweet meadow lolling. There are bones
of dead men rotting in a pile beside them
and flayed skins shrivel around the spot.
Steer wide;
50
keep well to seaward; plug your oarsmen’s ears
with beeswax kneaded soft; none of the rest
should hear that song.
But if you wish to listen,
let the men tie you in the lugger,3 hand
and foot, back to the mast, lashed to the mast,
so you may hear those harpies’
4
thrilling voices;
shout as you will, begging to be untied,
2
In Grecian fable, women who could lure men to their destruction through their entranc-
ing song. Also spelled Sirens.
3
A small boat.
4
In this passage, the word “harpies” means “temptresses.” They are not the obscene and
filthy females who appear in Virgil’s Aeneid, Book III.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Twelve
421
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 421
your crew must only twist more line around you
and keep their stroke up, till the singers fade.
What then? One of two courses you may take,
60
and you yourself must weigh them. I shall not
plan the whole action for you now, but only
tell you of both.
Ahead are beetling rocks
and dark blue glancing Amphitritê,
5
surging,
roars around them. Prowling Rocks,6 or Drifters,
the gods in bliss have named them—named them well.
Not even birds can pass them by, not even
the timorous doves that bear ambrosia
to Father Zeus; caught by downdrafts, they die
on rockwall smooth as ice.
Each time, the Father
70
wafts a new courier to make up his crew.
Still less can ships get searoom of these Drifters,
whose boiling surf, under high fiery winds,
carries tossing wreckage of ships and men.
Only one ocean-going craft, the far-famed
Argo,7 made it, sailing from Aiêta;
but she, too, would have crashed on the big rocks
if Hêra had not pulled her through, for love
of Iêson, her captain.
A second course8
lies between headlands. One is a sharp mountain
80
piercing the sky, with stormcloud round the peak
dissolving never, not in the brightest summer,
to show heaven’s azure there, nor in the fall.
No mortal man could scale it, nor so much
as land there, not with twenty hands and feet,
so sheer the cliffs are—as of polished stone.
Midway that height, a cavern full of mist
opens toward Erebos and evening. Skirting
this in the lugger, great Odysseus,
your master bowman, shooting from the deck,
90
would come short of the cavemouth with his shaft;
but that is the den of Skylla, where she yaps
abominably, a newborn whelp’s cry,
5Sea nymph; consort of Poseidon. She is the female personification of the ocean.
6Possibly the Planctae, islands at the north end of what is now called the Strait of Messina,
which divides Sicily from the Italian mainland.
7The fabled ship, manned by great heroes and captained by Iêson (Jason), that sailed to
capture the Golden Fleece.
8The following lines describe the two fabled monsters Skylla (Scylla) and Kharybdis
(Charybdis), who presumably personify the dangers of the Strait of Messina. Skylla is a treach-
erous reef, Kharybdis a whirlpool. The proverbial phrase “between Scylla and Charybdis” has
come to mean a situation in which one has to choose between equally dreadful alternatives.
422
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 422
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested