c# open a pdf file : Add and delete pages in pdf software application dll winforms windows web page web forms The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation17-part1243

To this the grey-eyed goddess Athena answered:
“Always the same detachment! That is why
I cannot fail you, in your evil fortune,
coolheaded, quick, well-spoken as you are!
Would not another wandering man, in joy,
390
make haste home to his wife and children? Not
you, not yet. Before you hear their story
you will have proof about your wife.
I tell you,
she still sits where you left her, and her days
and nights go by forlorn, in lonely weeping.
For my part, never had I despaired; I felt
sure or your coming home, though all your men
should perish; but I never cared to fight
Poseidon, Father’s brother, in his baleful
rage with you for taking his son’s eye.
400
Now I shall make you see the shape of Ithaka.
Here is the cove the sea lord Phorkys owns,
there is the olive spreading out her leaves
over the inner bay, and there the cavern
dusky and lovely, hallowed by the feet
of those immortal girls, the Naiadês—
the same wide cave under whose vault you came
to honor them with hekatombs—and there
Mount Neion, with his forest on his back!”
She had dispelled the mist, so all the island
410
stood out clearly. Then indeed Odysseus’
heart stirred with joy. He kissed the earth,
and lifting up his hands prayed to the nymphs:
“O slim shy Naiadês, young maids of Zeus,
I had not thought to see you ever again!
O listen smiling
to my gentle prayers, and we’ll make offering
plentiful as in the old time, granted I
live, granted my son grows tall, by favor
of great Athena, Zeus’s daughter,
who gives the winning fighter his reward!”
420
The grey-eyed goddess said directly:
“Courage;
and let the future trouble you no more. 
We go to make a cache now, in the cave,
to keep your treasure hid. Then we’ll consider
how best the present action may unfold.”
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Thirteen
443
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 443
Add and delete pages in pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf reader; delete pages of pdf preview
Add and delete pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf file; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
The goddess turned and entered the dim cave,
exploring it for crannies, while Odysseus
carried up all the gold, the fire-hard bronze,
and well-made clothing the Phaiákians gave him.
Pallas Athena, daughter of Zeus the storm king,
430
placed them, and shut the cave mouth with a stone,
and under the old grey olive tree those two
sat down to work the suitors death and woe.
Grey-eyed Athena was the first to speak, saying:
“Son of Laërtês and the gods of old,
Odysseus, master of land ways and sea ways,
put your mind on a way to reach and strike
a crowd of brazen upstarts.
Three long years
they have played master in your house: three years
trying to win your lovely lady, making
440
gifts as though betrothed. And she? Forever
grieving for you, missing your return,
she has allowed them all to hope, and sent
messengers with promises to each—
though her true thoughts are fixed elsewhere.”
At this
the man of ranging mind, Odysseus, cried:
“So hard beset! An end like Agamémnon’s
might very likely have been mine, a bad end,
bleeding to death in my own hall. You forestalled it,
goddess, by telling me how the land lies.
450
Weave me a way to pay them back! And you, too,
take your place with me, breathe valor in me 
the way you did that night when we Akhaians
unbound the bright veil from the brow of Troy!
O grey-eyed one, fire my heart and brace me!
I’ll take on fighting men three hundred strong
if you fight at my back, immortal lady!”
The grey-eyed goddess Athena answered him:
“No fear but I shall be there; you’ll go forward
under my arm when the crux comes at last.
460
And I foresee your vast floor stained with blood,
spattered with brains of this or that tall suitor
who fed upon your cattle.
Now, for a while,
I shall transform you; not a soul will know you,
the clear skin of your arms and legs shriveled,
your chestnut hair all gone, your body dressed
in sacking that a man would gag to see,
and the two eyes, that were so brilliant, dirtied—
444
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 444
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image
delete pages pdf online; delete blank pages in pdf files
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
processing control SDK, you can create & add new PDF rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
add remove pages from pdf; cut pages out of pdf online
contemptible, you shall seem to your enemies,
as to the wife and son you left behind.
470
But join the swineherd first—the overseer
of all your swine, a good soul now as ever,
devoted to Penélopê and your son.
He will be found near Raven’s Rock and the well
of Arethousa,
4
where the swine are pastured,
rooting for acorns to their hearts’ content,
drinking the dark still water. Boarflesh grows
pink and fat on that fresh diet. There
stay with him, and question him, while I
am off to the great beauty’s land of Sparta,
480
to call your son Telémakhos home again—
for you should know, he went to the wide land
of Lakedaimon, Meneláos’ country,
to learn if there were news of you abroad.”
Odysseus answered:
“Why not tell him, knowing
my whole history, as you do? Must he
traverse the barren sea, he too, and live
in pain, while others feed on what is his?”
At this the grey-eyed goddess Athena said:
“No need for anguish on that lad’s account.
490
I sent him off myself, to make his name
in foreign parts—no hardship in the bargain,
taking his ease in Meneláos’ mansion,
lapped in gold.
The young bucks here, I know,
lie in wait for him in a cutter, bent
on murdering him before he reaches home.
I rather doubt they will. Cold earth instead
will take in her embrace a man or two
of those who fed so long on what is his.”
Speaking no more, she touched him with her wand,
500
shriveled the clear skin of his arms and legs,
made all his hair fall out, cast over him
the wrinkled hide of an old man, and bleared
both his eyes, that were so bright. Then she
clapped an old tunic, a foul cloak, upon him,
tattered, filthy, stained by greasy smoke,
and over that a mangy big buck skin.
4
The  fountain  identified  with  the water  nymph Arethousa  (Arethusa)  is  more  often 
located in Sicily.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Thirteen
445
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 445
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
delete a page from a pdf online; delete pages from a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file. These two demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
cut pages from pdf file; delete blank page in pdf online
A staff she gave him, and a leaky knapsack
with no strap but a loop of string.
Now then,
their colloquy at an end, they went their ways—
510
Athena toward illustrious Lakedaimon
Far over sea, to join Odysseus’ son.
BOOK FOURTEEN: HOSPITALITY IN THE FOREST
He went up from the cove through wooded ground,
taking a stony trail into the high hills, where
the swineherd lived, according to Athena.
Of all Odysseus’ field hands in the old days
this forester cared most for the estate;
and now Odysseus found him
in a remote clearing, sitting inside the gate
of a stockade he built to keep the swine
while his great lord was gone.
Working alone,
far from Penélopê and old Laërtês,
10
he had put up a fieldstone hut and timbered it
with wild pear wood. Dark hearts of oak he split
and trimmed for a high palisade around it,
and built twelve sties adjoining in this yard
to hold the livestock. Fifty sows with farrows
were penned in each, bedded upon the earth,
while the boars lay outside—fewer by far,
as those well-fatted were for the suitors’ table,
fine pork, sent by the swineherd every day.
Three hundred sixty now lay there at night,
20
guarded by dogs—four dogs like wolves, one each
for the four lads the swineherd reared and kept
as under-herdsmen.
When Odysseus came,
the good servant sat shaping to his feet
oxhide for sandals, cutting the well-cured leather.
Three of his young men were afield, pasturing
herds in other woods; one he had sent
with a fat boar for tribute into town,
the boy to serve while the suitors got their fill.
The watch dogs, when they caught sight of Odysseus,
30
faced him, a snarling troop, and pelted out
viciously after him. Like a tricky beggar
he sat down plump, and dropped his stick. No use.
They would have rolled him in the dust and torn him
446
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 446
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete a page in a pdf file; delete pdf pages online
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
delete pages from pdf file online; delete pdf pages
there by his own steading1 if the swineherd
had not sprung up and flung his leather down,
making a beeline for the open. Shouting,
throwing stone after stone,
he made them scatter; then turned to his lord
and said:
“You might have got a ripping, man!
40
Two shakes more and a pretty mess for me
you could have called it, if you had the breath.
As though I had not trouble enough already,
given me by the gods, my master gone,
true king that he was. I hang on here,
still mourning for him, raising pigs of his
to feed foreigners, and who knows where the man is,
in some far country among strangers! Aye—
if he is living still, if he still sees the light of day.
Come to the cabin. You’re a wanderer too.
50
You must eat something, drink some wine, and tell me
where you are from and the hard times you’ve seen.”
The forester now led him to his hut
and made a couch for him, with tips of fir
piled for a mattress under a wild goat skin,
shaggy and thick, his own bed covering.
Odysseus,
in pleasure at this courtesy, gently said:
“May Zeus and all the gods give you your heart’s desire
for taking me in so kindly, friend.”
Eumaios—
O my swineherd!2—answered him:
“Tush, friend,
60
rudeness to a stranger is not decency,
poor though he may be, poorer than you.
All wanderers
and beggars come from Zeus. What we can give
is slight but well-meant—all we dare. You know
that is the way of slaves,3 who live in dread
of masters—new ones like our own.
1
Farmhouse or farm.
2
This kind of direct address by the poet, expressing affection, is used in the Odyssey only
for Eumaios.
3
Though owned by masters as in modern forms of slavery, and often obtained by forced
capture, “slaves” in the aristocratic Homeric times were often more like trusted and respon-
sible servants than like maltreated property. Eumaios and Telémakhos’ old nurse Eur´ykleia,
described elsewhere in the Odyssey, are representative examples.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Fourteen
447
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 447
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to textMgr.SelectChar(page, cursor) ' Delete a selected As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save
delete page pdf; copy pages from pdf to word
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file. These C# demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
delete page in pdf online; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
I told you
the gods, long ago, hindered our lord’s return.
He had a fondness for me, would have pensioned me
with acres of my own, a house, a wife
that other men admired and courted; all
70
gifts good-hearted kings bestow for service,
for a life work the bounty of god has prospered—
for it does prosper here, this work I do.
Had he grown old in his own house, my master
would have rewarded me. But the man’s gone.
God curse the race of Helen and cut it down,
that wrung the strength out of the knees of many!
And he went, too—for the honor of Agamémnon
he took ship overseas for the wild horse country
of Troy, to fight the Trojans.”
This being told,
80
he tucked his long shirt up inside his belt
and strode into the pens for two young porkers.
He slaughtered them and singed them at the fire,
flayed and quartered them, and skewered the meat
to broil it all; then gave it to Odysseus
hot on the spits. He shook out barley meal,
took a winebowl of ivy wood and filled it,
and sat down facing him, with a gesture, saying:
“There is your dinner, friend, the pork of slaves.
Our fat shoats are all eaten by the suitors,
90
cold-hearted men, who never spare a thought
for how they stand in the sight of Zeus. The gods
living in bliss are fond of no wrongdoing,
but honor discipline and right behavior.
Even the outcasts of the earth, who bring
piracy from the sea, and bear off plunder
given by Zeus in shiploads—even those men
deep in their hearts tremble for heaven’s eye.
But the suitors, now, have heard some word, some oracle
of my lord’s death, being so unconcerned
100
to pay court properly or to go about their business.
All they want is to prey on his estate,
proud dogs; they stop at nothing. Not a day
goes by, and not a night comes under Zeus,
but they make butchery of our beeves and swine—
not one or two beasts at a time, either.
As for swilling down wine, they drink us dry.
Only a great domain like his could stand it—
greater than any on the dusky mainland
or here in Ithaka. Not twenty heroes
110
in the whole world were as rich as he. I know:
I could count it all up; twelve herds in Elis,
448
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 448
as many flocks, as many herds of swine,
and twelve wide-ranging herds of goats, as well,
attended by his own men or by others—
out at the end of the island, eleven herds
are scattered now, with good men looking after them,
and every herdsman, every day, picks out
a prize ram to hand over to those fellows.
I too as overseer, keeper of swine,
120
must go through all my boars and send the best.”
While he ran on, Odysseus with zeal
applied himself to the meat and wine, but inwardly
his thought shaped woe and ruin for the suitors.
When he had eaten all that he desired
and the cup he drank from had been filled again
with wine—a welcome sight—,
he spoke, and the words came light upon the air:
“Who is this lord who once acquired you,
so rich, so powerful, as you describe him?
130
You think he died for Agamémnon’s honor.
Tell me his name: I may have met someone
of that description in my time. Who knows?
Perhaps only the immortal gods could say
if I should claim to have seen him: I have roamed
about the world so long.”
The swineherd answered
as one who held a place of trust:
“Well, man,
his lady and his son will put no stock
in any news of him brought by a rover.
Wandering men tell lies for a night’s lodging,
140
for fresh clothing; truth doesn’t interest them.
Every time some traveller comes ashore
he has to tell my mistress his pretty tale,
and she receives him kindly, questions him,
remembering her prince, while the tears run
down her cheeks—and that is as it should be
when a woman’s husband has been lost abroad.
I suppose you, too, can work your story up
at a moment’s notice, given a shirt or cloak.
No: long ago wild dogs and carrion
150
birds, most like, laid bare his ribs on land
where life had left him. Or it may be, quick fishes
picked him clean in the deep sea, and his bones
lie mounded over in sand upon some shore.
One way or another, far from home he died,
a bitter loss, and pain, for everyone,
certainly for me. Never again shall I
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Fourteen
449
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 449
have for my lot a master mild as he was
anywhere—not even with my parents
at home, where I was born and bred. I miss them
160
less than I do him—though a longing comes
to set my eyes on them in the old country.
No, it is the lost man I ache to think of—
Odysseus. And I speak the name respectfully,
even if he is not here. He loved me, cared for me.
I call him dear my lord, far though he be.”
Now royal Odysseus, who had borne the long war,
spoke again:
“Friend, as you are so dead sure
he will not come—and so mistrustful, too—
let me not merely talk, as others talk,
170
but swear to it: your lord is now at hand.
And I expect a gift for this good news
when he enters his own hall. Till then I would not
take a rag, no matter what my need.
I hate as I hate Hell’s own gate that weakness
that makes a poor man into a flatterer.
Zeus be my witness, and the table garnished
for true friends, and Odysseus’ own hearth—
by heaven, all I say will come to pass!
He will return, and he will be avenged
180
on any who dishonor his wife and son.”
Eumaios—O my swineherd!—answered him:
“I take you at your word, then: you shall have
no good news gift from me. Nor will Odysseus
enter his hall. But peace! drink up your wine.
Let us talk now of other things. No more
imaginings. It makes me heavy-hearted
when someone brings my master back to mind—
my own true master.
No, by heaven,
let us have no oaths! But if Odysseus
190
can come again god send he may! My wish
is that of Penélopê and old Laërtês
and Prince Telémakhos.
Ah, he’s another
to be distressed about—Odysseus’ child,
Telémakhos! By the gods’ grace he grew
like a tough sapling, and I thought he’d be
no less a man than his great father—strong
and admirably made; but then someone,
god or man, upset him, made him rash,
so that he sailed away to sandy Pylos
200
to hear news of his father. Now the suitors
450
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 450
lie in ambush on his homeward track,
ready to cut away the last shoot of Arkêsios’
4
line, the royal stock of Ithaka.
No good
dwelling on it. Either he’ll be caught
or else Kroníon’s5 hand will take him through.
Tell me, now, of your own trials and troubles.
And tell me truly first, for I should know,
who are you, where do you hail from, where’s your home
and family? What kind of ship was yours,
210
and what course brought you here? Who are your sailors?
I don’t suppose you walked here on the sea.”
To this the master of improvisation answered:
“I’ll tell you all that, clearly as I may.
If we could sit here long enough, with meat
and good sweet wine, warm here, in peace and quiet
within doors, while the work of the world goes on—
I might take all this year to tell my story
and never end the tale of misadventures
that wore my heart out, by the gods’ will.
220
My native land is the wide seaboard of Krete
where I grew up. I had a wealthy father,
and many other sons were born to him
of his true lady. My mother was a slave,
his concubine; but Kastor Hylákidês,
my father, treated me as a true born son.
High honor came to him in that part of Krete
for wealth and ease, and sons born for renown,
before the death-bearing Kêrês6 drew him down
to the underworld. His avid sons thereafter
230
dividing up the property by lot
gave me a wretched portion, a poor house.
But my ability won me a wife
of rich family. Fool I was never called,
nor turn-tail in a fight.
My strength’s all gone,
but from the husk you may divine the ear
that stood tall in the old days. Misery owns me
now, but then great Arês and Athena
gave me valor and man-breaking power,
whenever I made choice of men-at-arms
240
to set a trap with me for my enemies.
4
Odysseus’ paternal grandfather.
5
Zeus, son of Kronos.
6
That is, the forces of death.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Fourteen
451
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 451
Never, as I am a man, did I fear Death
ahead, but went in foremost in the charge,
putting a spear through any man whose legs
were not as fast as mine. That was my element,
war and battle. Farming I never cared for,
nor life at home, nor fathering fair children.
I reveled in long ships with oars; I loved
polished lances, arrows in the skirmish,
the shapes of doom that others shake to see.
250
Carnage suited me; heaven put those things
in me somehow. Each to his own pleasure!
Before we young Akhaians shipped for Troy
I led men on nine cruises in corsairs
to raid strange coasts, and had great luck, taking
rich spoils on the spot, and even more
in the division. So my house grew prosperous,
my standing therefore high among the Kretans.
Then came the day when Zeus who views the wide world
drew men’s eyes upon that way accurst
260
that wrung the manhood from the knees of many!
Everyone pressed me, pressed King Idómeneus
to take command of ships for Ilion.
No way out; the country rang with talk of it.
So we Akhaians had nine years of war.
In the tenth year we sacked the inner city,
Priam’s town, and sailed for home; but heaven
dispersed the Akhaians. Evil days for me
were stored up in the hidden mind of Zeus.
One month, no more, I stayed at home in joy
270
with children, wife, and treasure. Lust for action
drove me to go to sea then, in command
of ships and gallant seamen bound for Egypt.
Nine ships I fitted out; my men signed on
and came to feast with me, as good shipmates,
for six full days. Many a beast I slaughtered
in the gods’ honor, for my friends to eat.
Embarking on the seventh, we hauled sail
and filled away from Krete on a fresh north wind
effortlessly, as boats will glide down stream.
280
All rigging whole and all hands well, we rested,
letting the wind and steersmen work the ships,
for five days; on the fifth we made the delta.7
I brought my squadron in to the river bank
with one turn of the sweeps. There, heaven knows,
I told the men to wait and guard the ships
while I sent out patrols to rising ground.
7
The estuary of the Nile River. Though the entire present account by Odysseus of his past
life is meant to deceive, many of his invented stories correspond to what in fact did happen
to him.
452
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 452
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested