c# open a pdf file : Delete page from pdf reader application software tool html windows winforms online The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation19-part1245

This going abroad for news of a great father—
heaven forbid it be my own undoing,
or any precious thing be lost at home.”
At this the tall king, clarion in battle,
called to his lady and her waiting women
to give them breakfast from the larder stores.
110
Eteóneus, the son of Boethoös, came
straight from bed, from where he lodged nearby,
and Meneláos ordered a fire lit
for broiling mutton. The king’s man obeyed.
Then down to the cedar chamber Meneláos
walked with Helen and Prince Megapénthês.
Amid the gold he had in that place lying
the son of Atreus picked a wine cup, wrought
with handles left and right, and told his son
to take a silver winebowl.
Helen lingered
120
near the deep coffers filled with gowns, her own
handiwork.
Tall goddess among women,
she lifted out one robe of state so royal,
adorned and brilliant with embroidery,
deep in the chest it shimmered like a star.
Now all three turned back to the door to greet
Telémakhos. And red-haired Meneláos
cried out to him:
“O prince Telémakhos,
may Hêra’s Lord of Thunder see you home
and bring you to the welcome you desire!
130
Here are your gifts—perfect and precious things
I wish to make your own, out of my treasure.”
And gently the great captain, son of Atreus,
handed him the goblet. Megapénthês
carried the winebowl glinting silvery
to set before him, and the Lady Helen
drew near, so that he saw her cheek’s pure line.
She held the gown and murmured:
“I, too,
bring you a gift, dear child, and here it is;
140
remember Helen’s hands by this; keep it
for your own bride, your joyful wedding day;
let your dear mother guard it in her chamber.
My blessing: may you come soon to your island,
home to your timbered hall.”
So she bestowed it,
and happily he took it. These fine things
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Fifteen
463
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 463
Delete page from pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages in preview; delete pages on pdf
Delete page from pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
reader extract pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
Peisístratos packed well in the wicker carrier,
admiring every one. Then Meneláos
led the two guests in to take their seats
on thrones and easy chairs in the great hall.
150
Now came a maid to tip a golden jug
of water over a silver finger bowl,
and draw the polished tables up beside them;
the larder mistress brought her tray of loaves,
with many savories to lavish on them;
viands were served by Eteóneus, and wine
by Meneláos’ son. Then every hand
reached out upon good meat and drink to take them,
driving away hunger and thirst. At last,
Telémakhos and Nestor’s son led out
160
their team to harness, mounted their bright car,
and drove down under the echoing entrance way,
while red-haired Meneláos, Atreus’ son,
walked alongside with a golden cup—
wine for the wayfarers to spill at parting.
Then by the tugging team he stood, and spoke
over the horses’ heads:
“Farewell, my lads.
Homage to Nestor, the benevolent king;
in my time he was fatherly to me,
when the flower of Akhaia warred on Troy.”
170
Telémakhos made this reply:
“No fear 
but we shall bear at least as far as Nestor
your messages, great king. How I could wish
to bring them home to Ithaka! If only
Odysseus were there, if he could hear me tell
of all the courtesy I have had from you,
returning with your finery and your treasure.”
Even as he spoke, a beat of wings went skyward
off to the right—a mountain eagle, grappling
180
a white goose in his talons, heavy prey
hooked from a farmyard. Women and men-at-arms
made hubbub, running up, as he flew over,
but then he wheeled hard right before the horses—
a sight that made the whole crowd cheer, with hearts
lifting in joy. Peisístratos called out:
“Read us the sign, O Meneláos, Lord
Marshal of armies! Was the god revealing
something thus to you, or to ourselves?”
At this the old friend of the god of battle
190
464
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 464
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete page from pdf reader; delete blank pages in pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete pdf pages android; acrobat remove pages from pdf
groped in his mind for the right thing to say,
but regal Helen put in quickly:
“Listen: 
I can tell you—tell what the omen means,
as light is given me, and as I see it
point by point fulfilled. The beaked eagle
flew from the wild mountain of his fathers
to take for prey the tame house bird. Just so,
Odysseus, back from his hard trials and wandering,
will soon come down in fury on his house.
200
He may be there today, and a black hour
he brings upon the suitors.”
Telémakhos
gazed and said:
“May Zeus, the lord of Hêra,
make it so! In far-off Ithaka, all my life,
I shall invoke you as a goddess, lady.”
He let the whip fall, and the restive mares
broke forward at a canter through the town
into the open country.
All that day
they kept their harness shaking, side by side,
until at sundown when the roads grew dim
210
they made a halt at Pherai. There Dióklês
son of Ortílokhos whom Alpheios fathered,
welcomed the young men, and they slept the night.
Up when the young Dawn’s finger tips of rose
opened in the east, they hitched the team
once more to the painted car
and steered out westward through the echoing gate,
whipping their fresh horses into a run.
Approaching Pylos Height at the day’s end,
Telémakhos appealed to the son of Nestor:
220
“Could you, I wonder, do a thing I’ll tell you,
supposing you agree?
We take ourselves to be true friends—in age
alike, and bound by ties between our fathers,
and now by partnership in this adventure.
Prince, do not take me roundabout,
but leave me at the ship, else the old king
your father will detain me overnight
for love of guests, when I should be at sea.”
The son of Nestor nodded, thinking swiftly
230
how best he could oblige his friend.
Here was his choice: to pull the team hard over
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Fifteen
465
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 465
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete page in pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a to remove a specific image from PDF document page. PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component.
add and delete pages from pdf; delete blank page in pdf
along the beach till he could rein them in
beside the ship. Unloading Meneláos’
royal keepsakes into the stern sheets,
he sang out:
“Now for action! Get aboard,
and call your men, before I break the news
at home in hall to father. Who knows better
the old man’s heart than I? If you delay,
he will not let you go, but he’ll descend on you
240
in person and imperious; no turning
back with empty hands for him, believe me,
once his blood is up.”
He shook the reins
to the lovely mares with long manes in the wind,
guiding them full tilt toward his father’s hall.
Telémakhos called in the crew, and told them:
“Get everything shipshape aboard this craft;
we pull out now, and put sea miles behind us.”
The listening men obeyed him, climbing in
to settle on their benches by the rowlocks,
250
while he stood watchful by the stern. He poured out
offerings there, and prayers to Athena.
Now a strange man came up to him, an easterner
fresh from spilling blood in distant Argos,
a hunted man. Gifted in prophecy,
he had as forebear that Melampous,
3
wizard
who lived of old in Pylos, mother city
of western flocks.
Melampous, a rich lord,
had owned a house unmatched among the Pylians,
until the day came when king Neleus, noblest
260
in that age, drove him from his native land.
And Neleus for a year’s term sequestered
Melampous’ fields and flocks, while he lay bound
hand and foot in the keep of Phylakos.
Beauty of Neleus’ daughter put him there
and sombre folly the inbreaking Fury
thrust upon him. But he gave the slip
to death, and drove the bellowing herd of Iphiklos
from Phylakê to Pylos, there to claim
the bride that ordeal won him from the king.
270
He led her to his brother’s house, and went on
eastward into another land, the bluegrass
3
For the stories of Melampous and Amphiaraos, see Book XI and the notes to it.
466
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 466
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Able to delete text characters
delete pages from pdf preview; add and delete pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX a specific image from PDF document page in VB.NET PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component in
delete pages pdf; delete page pdf file reader
plain of Argos. Destiny held for him
rule over many Argives. Here he married,
built a great manor house, fathered Antíphatês
and Mantios, commanders both, of whom
Antíphatês begot Oikleiês
and Oikleiês the firebrand Amphiaraos.
This champion the lord of stormcloud, Zeus,
and strong Apollo loved; nor had he ever
280
to cross the doorsill into dim old age.
A woman, bought by trinkets, gave him over
to be cut down in the assault on Thebes.
His sons were Alkmáon and Amphílokhos.
In the meantime Lord Mantios begot
Polypheidês, the prophet, and
Kleitos—famous name! For Dawn4 in silks
of gold carried off Kleitos for his beauty
to live among the gods. But Polypheidês,
high-hearted and exalted by Apollo
290
above all men for prophecy, withdrew
to Hyperesia
5
when his father angered him.
He lived on there, foretelling to the world
the shape of things to come.
His son it was,
Theokl´ymenos, who came upon Telémakhos
as he poured out the red wine in the sand
near his trim ship, with prayer to Athena;
and he called out, approaching:
“Friend, well met
here at libation before going to sea.
I pray you by the wine you spend, and by
300
your god, your own life, and your company;
enlighten me, and let the truth be known.
Who are you? Of what city and what parents?”
Telémakhos turned to him and replied:
“Stranger, as truly as may be, I’ll tell you.
I am from Ithaka, where I was born;
my father is, or he once was, Odysseus.
But he’s a long time gone, and dead, may be;
and that is what I took ship with my friends
to find out—for he left long years ago.”
310
Said Theokl´ymenos in reply:
“I too
have had to leave my home. I killed a cousin.
4
Eos, goddess of the dawn.
5
A town on the Corinthian bay; part of Agamémnon’s kingdom.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Fifteen
467
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 467
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
BurnAnnotation: Burn all annotations to PDF page. DeleteAnnotation: Delete all selected annotations. guidance for you to create and add a PDF document viewer &
add or remove pages from pdf; cut pages out of pdf
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in code able to help users delete text characters to pull text out of selected PDF page or all
delete pages on pdf file; delete page pdf file
In the wide grazing lands of Argos live
many kinsmen of his and friends in power,
great among the Akhaians. These I fled.
Death and vengeance at my back, as Fate
has turned now, I came wandering overland.
Give me a plank aboard your ship, I beg,
or they will kill me. They are on my track.”
320
Telémakhos made answer:
“No two ways
about it. Will I pry you from our gunnel6
when you are desperate to get to sea?
Come aboard; share what we have, and welcome.”
He took the bronze-shod lance from the man’s hand
and laid it down full-length on deck; then swung
his own weight after it aboard the cutter,
taking position aft, making a place
for Theokl´ymenos near him. The stern lines
were slacked off, and Telémakhos commanded:
330
“Rig the mast; make sail!” Nimbly they ran
to push the fir pole high and step it firm
amidships in the box, make fast the forestays,
and hoist aloft the white sail on its halyards.
A following wind came down from grey-eyed Athena,
blowing brisk through heaven, and so steady
the cutter lapped up miles of salt blue sea,
passing Krounoi
7
abeam and Khalkis estuary
at sundown when the sea ways all grew dark.
Then, by Athena’s wind borne on, the ship
340
rounded Pheai by night and coasted Elis,
the green domain of the Epeioi; thence
he put her head north toward the running pack
of islets, wondering if by sailing wide
he sheered off Death, or would be caught.
That night
Odysseus and the swineherd supped again
with herdsmen in their mountain hut. At ease
when appetite and thirst were turned away,
Odysseus, while he talked, observed the swineherd
to see if he were hospitable still—
350
if yet again the man would make him stay
under his roof, or send him off to town.
6Gunwale; the top edge of the ship’s side.
7The following lines describe the ship’s northwest course along the southwest coast of Greece.
468
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 468
“Listen,” he said, “Eumaios; listen, lads.
At daybreak I must go and try my luck
around the port. I burden you too long.
Direct me, put me on the road with someone.
Nothing else for it but to play the beggar
in populous parts. I’ll get a cup or loaf,
maybe, from some householder. If I go
as far as the great hall of King Odysseus
360
I might tell Queen Penélopê my news.
Or I can drift inside among the suitors
to see what alms they give, rich as they are.
If they have whims, I’m deft in ways of service—
that I can say, and you may know for sure.
By grace of Hermês the Wayfinder, patron
of mortal tasks, the god who honors toil,
no man can do a chore better than I can.
Set me to build a fire, or chop wood,
cook or carve, mix wine and serve—or anything
370
inferior men attend to for the gentry.”
Now you were furious at this, Eumaios,
and answered—O my swineherd!—
“Friend, friend,
how could this fantasy take hold of you?
You dally with your life, and nothing less,
if you feel drawn to mingle in that company—
reckless, violent, and famous for it
out to the rim of heaven. Slaves
they have, but not like you. No—theirs are boys
in fresh cloaks and tunics, with pomade
380
ever on their sleek heads, and pretty faces.
These are their minions, while their tables gleam
and groan under big roasts, with loaves and wine.
Stay with us here. No one is burdened by you,
neither myself nor any of my hands.
Wait here until Odysseus’ son returns.
You shall have clothing from him, cloak and tunic,
and passage where your heart desires to go.”
The noble and enduring man replied:
“May you be dear to Zeus for this, Eumaios,
390
even as you are to me. Respite from pain
you give me—and from homelessness. In life
there’s nothing worse than knocking about the world,
no bitterness we vagabonds are spared
when the curst belly rages! Well, you master it
and me, making me wait for the king’s son.
But now, come, tell me:
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Fifteen
469
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 469
what of Odysseus’ mother, and his father
whom he took leave of on the sill of age?
Are they under the sun’s rays, living still,
400
or gone down long ago to lodge with Death?”
To this the rugged herdsman answered:
“Aye,
that I can tell you; it is briefly told.
Laërtês lives, but daily in his hall
prays for the end of life and soul’s delivery,
heartbroken as he is for a son long gone
and for his lady. Sorrow, when she died,
aged and enfeebled him like a green tree stricken;
but pining for her son, her brilliant son,
410
wore out her life.
Would god no death so sad
might come to benefactors dear as she!
I loved always to ask and hear about her
while she lived, although she lived in sorrow.
For she had brought me up with her own daughter,
Princess Ktimenê, her youngest child.
We were alike in age and nursed as equals
nearly, till in the flower of our years
they gave her, married her, to a Samian prince,
taking his many gifts. For my own portion
420
her mother gave new clothing, cloak and sandals,
and sent me to the woodland. Well she loved me.
Ah, how I miss that family! It is true
the blissful gods prosper my work; I have
meat and drink to spare for those I prize;
but so removed I am, I have no speech
with my sweet mistress, now that evil days
and overbearing men darken her house.
Tenants all hanker for good talk and gossip
around their lady, and a snack in hall,
430
a cup or two before they take the road
to their home acres, each one bearing home
some gift to cheer his heart.”
The great tactician
answered:
“You were still a child, I see,
when exiled somehow from your parents’ land.
Tell me, had it been sacked in war, the city
of spacious ways in which they made their home,
your father and your gentle mother? Or
were you kidnapped alone, brought here by sea
huddled with sheep in some foul pirate squadron,
440
to this landowner’s hall? He paid your ransom?”
470
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 470
The master of the woodland answered:
“Friend,
now that you show an interest in that matter,
attend me quietly, be at your ease,
and drink your wine. These autumn nights are long,
ample for story-telling and for sleep.
You need not go to bed before the hour;
sleeping from dusk to dawn’s a dull affair.
Let any other here who wishes, though,
retire to rest. At daybreak let him breakfast
450
and take the king’s own swine into the wilderness.
Here’s a tight roof; we’ll drink on, you and I,
and ease our hearts of hardships we remember,
sharing old times. In later days a man
can find a charm in old adversity,
exile and pain. As to your question, now:
A certain island, Syriê by name—
you may have heard the name—lies off Ort´ygia8
due west, and holds the sunsets of the year.
Not very populous, but good for grazing
460
sheep and kine; rich too in wine and grain.
No dearth is ever known there, no disease
wars on the folk, of ills that plague mankind;
but when the townsmen reach old age, Apollo
with his longbow of silver comes, and Artemis,
showering arrows of mild death.
Two towns
divide the farmlands of that whole domain,
and both were ruled by Ktêsios, my father,
Orménos’ heir, and a great godlike man.
Now one day some of those renowned seafaring
470
men, sea-dogs, Phoinikians, came ashore
with bags of gauds for trading. Father had
in our household a woman of Phoinikia,
a handsome one, and highly skilled. Well, she
gave in to the seductions of those rovers.
One of them found her washing near the mooring
and lay with her, making such love to her
as women in their frailty are confused by,
even the best of them.
In due course, then,
he asked her who she was and where she hailed from:
480
and nodding toward my father’s roof, she said:
8
Though there were actual places bearing the names of Syriê and Ort´ygia, in the present
context they refer vaguely to unidentifiable localities, probably in northwestern Greece, and
possibly invented by the poet.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Fifteen
471
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 471
‘I am of Sidon town, smithy of bronze
for all the East. Arubas Pasha’s daughter.
Taphian pirates caught me in a byway
and sold me into slavery overseas
in this man’s home. He could afford my ransom.’
The sailor who had lain with her replied:
‘Why not ship out with us on the run homeward,
and see your father’s high-roofed hall again,
your father and your mother? Still in Sidon
490
and still rich, they are said to be.’
She answered:
‘It could be done, that, if you sailors take
oath I’ll be given passage home unharmed.’
Well, soon she had them swearing it all pat 
as she desired, repeating every syllable, 
whereupon she warned them:
‘Not a word
about our meeting here! Never call out to me
when any of you see me in the lane
or at the well. Some visitor might bear
tales to the old man. If he guessed the truth,
500
I’d be chained up, your lives would be in peril.
No: keep it secret. Hurry with your peddling,
and when your hold is filled with livestock, send
a message to me at the manor hall.
Gold I’ll bring, whatever comes to hand,
and something else, too, as my passage fee—
the master’s child, my charge: a boy so high,
bright for his age; he runs with me on errands.
I’d take him with me happily; his price
would be I know not what in sale abroad.’
510
Her bargain made, she went back to the manor.
But they were on the island all that year,
getting by trade a cargo of our cattle;
until, the ship at length being laden full,
ready for sea, they sent a messenger
to the Phoinikian woman. Shrewd he was,
this fellow who came round my father’s hall,
showing a golden chain all strung with amber,
a necklace. Maids in waiting and my mother
passed it from hand to hand, admiring it,
520
engaging they would buy it. But that dodger,
as soon as he had caught the woman’s eye
and nodded, slipped away to join the ship.
472
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 472
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested