c# open a pdf file : Add and delete pages in pdf online application Library utility azure .net wpf visual studio The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation20-part1247

She took my hand and led me through the court
into the portico. There by luck she found
winecups and tables still in place—for Father’s
attendant counselors had dined just now
before they went to the assembly. Quickly
she hid three goblets in her bellying dress
to carry with her, while I tagged along
530
in my bewilderment. The sun went down
and all the lanes grew dark as we descended,
skirting the harbor in our haste to where
those traders of Phoinikia held their ship.
All went aboard at once and put to sea,
taking the two of us. A favoring wind
blew from the power of heaven. We sailed on
six nights and days without event. Then Zeus
the son of Kronos added one more noon—and sudden
arrows from Artemis pierced the woman’s heart.
540
Stone-dead she dropped
into the sloshing bilge the way a tern
plummets; and the sailors heaved her over
as tender pickings for the seals and fish.
Now I was left in dread, alone, while wind
and current bore them on to Ithaka.
Laërtês purchased me. That was the way
I first laid eyes upon this land.”
Odysseus,
the kingly man, replied:
“You rouse my pity,
telling what you endured when you were young.
550
But surely Zeus put good alongside ill:
torn from your own far home, you had the luck
to come into a kind man’s service, generous
with food and drink. And a good life you lead,
unlike my own, all spent in barren roaming
from one country to the next, till now.”
So the two men talked on, into the night,
leaving few hours for sleep before the Dawn
stepped up to her bright chair.
The ship now drifting
under the island lee, Telémakhos’
560
companions took in sail and mast, unshipped
the oars and rowed ashore. They moored her stern
by the stout hawser lines, tossed out the bow stones,
and waded in beyond the wash of ripples
to mix their wine and cook their morning meal.
When they had turned back hunger and thirst, Telémakhos
arose to give the order of the day.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Fifteen
473
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 473
Add and delete pages in pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf document; delete pdf pages reader
Add and delete pages in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page on pdf reader; delete pages from a pdf in preview
“Pull for the town,” he said, “and berth our ship,
while I go inland across country. Later,
this evening, after looking at my farms,
570
I’ll join you in the city. When day comes
I hope to celebrate our crossing, feasting
everyone on good red meat and wine.”
His noble passenger, Theokl´ymenos,
now asked:
“What as to me, my dear young fellow,
where shall I go? Will I find lodging here
with some one of the lords of stony Ithaka?
Or go straight to your mother’s hall and yours?”
Telémakhos turned round to him and said:
“I should myself invite you to our hall
580
if things were otherwise; there’d be no lack
of entertainment for you. As it stands,
no place could be more wretched for a guest
while I’m away. Mother will never see you;
she almost never shows herself at home
to the suitors there, but stays in her high chamber
weaving upon her loom. No, let me name
another man for you to go to visit:
Eur´ymakhos,
9
the honored son of Pólybos.
In Ithaka they are dazzled by him now—
590
the strongest of their princes, bent on making
mother and all Odysseus’ wealth his own.
Zeus on Olympos only knows
if some dark hour for them will intervene.”
The words were barely spoken, when a hawk,
Apollo’s courier, flew up on the right,
clutching a dove and plucking her—so feathers
floated down to the ground between Telémakhos
and the moored cutter. Theokl´ymenos
called him apart and gripped his hand, whispering:
600
“A god spoke in this bird-sign on the right.
I knew it when I saw the hawk fly over us.
There is no kinglier house than yours, Telémakhos,
here in the realm of Ithaka. Your family
will be in power forever.”
9Eur´ymakhos.Since he is one of Penélopê’s principal suitors, it is odd that Eur´ymakhos should
be recommended by Telémakhos as a host for his passenger. Indeed, Telémakhos soon changes
his mind and asks the trusted crewman Peiraios to house Theokl´ymenos. Possibly Telémakhos,
with something of his father’s wariness, hesitates until he has some evidence of Theokl´ymenos’
goodwill.
474
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 474
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; delete page from pdf file online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
processing control SDK, you can create & add new PDF rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete pages pdf files
The young prince,
clear in spirit, answered:
“Be it so,
friend, as you say. And may you know as well
the friendship of my house, and many gifts
from me, so everyone may call you fortunate.”
He called a trusted crewman named Peiraios,
610
and said to him:
“Peiraios, son of Kl´ytios,
can I rely on you again as ever, most
of all the friends who sailed with me to Pylos?
Take this man home with you, take care of him,
treat him with honor, till I come.”
To this
Peiraios the good spearman answered:
“Aye,
stay in the wild country while you will,
I shall be looking after him, Telémakhos.
He will not lack good lodging.”
Down to the ship
620
he turned, and boarded her, and called the others
to cast off the stern lines and come aboard.
So men climbed in to sit beside the rowlocks.
Telémakhos now tied his sandals on
and lifted his tough spear from the ship’s deck;
hawsers were taken in, and they shoved off
to reach the town by way of the open sea
as he commanded them—royal Odysseus’
own dear son, Telémakhos.
On foot
and swiftly he went up toward the stockade
630
where swine were penned in hundreds, and at night
the guardian of the swine, the forester,
slept under arms on duty for his masters.
BOOK SIXTEEN: FATHER AND SON
But there were two men in the mountain hut—
Odysseus and the swineherd. At first light
blowing their fire up, they cooked their breakfast
and sent their lads out, driving herds to root
in the tall timber.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Sixteen
475
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 475
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB
delete page from pdf preview; delete pages from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file. These two demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
delete a page from a pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
When Telémakhos came,
the wolvish troop of watchdogs only fawned on him 
as he advanced. Odysseus heard them go 
and heard the light crunch of a man’s footfall— 
at which he turned quickly to say:
“Eumaios,
here is one of your crew come back, or maybe
10
another friend: the dogs are out there snuffling
belly down; not one has even growled.
I can hear footsteps—”
But before he finished
his tall son stood at the door.
The swineherd
rose in surprise, letting a bowl and jug
tumble from his fingers. Going forward,
he kissed the young man’s head, his shining eyes
and both hands, while his own tears brimmed and fell.
Think of a man whose dear and only son,
born to him in exile, reared with labor,
20
has lived ten years abroad and now returns:
how would that man embrace his son! Just so
the herdsman clapped his arms around Telémakhos
and covered him with kisses—for he knew
the lad had got away from death. He said:
“Light of my days, Telémakhos,
you made it back! When you took ship for Pylos
I never thought to see you here again.
Come in, dear child, and let me feast my eyes;
here you are, home from the distant places!
30
How rarely, anyway, you visit us,
your own men, and your own woods and pastures!
Always in the town, a man would think
you loved the suitors’ company, those dogs!”
Telémakhos with his clear candor said:
“I am with you, Uncle. See now, I have come
because I wanted to see you first, to hear from you
if Mother stayed at home—or is she married
off to someone, and Odysseus’ bed
left empty for some gloomy spider’s weaving?”
40
Gently the forester replied to this:
“At home indeed your mother is, poor lady,
still in the women’s hall. Her nights and days
are wearied out with grieving.”
476
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 476
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to textMgr.SelectChar(page, cursor) ' Delete a selected As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save
delete pages pdf file; pdf delete page
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
delete pages from a pdf online; add and remove pages from a pdf
Stepping back
he took the bronze-shod lance, and the young prince
entered the cabin over the worn door stone.
Odysseus moved aside, yielding his couch,
but from across the room Telémakhos checked him:
“Friend, sit down; we’ll find another chair
in our own hut. Here is the man to make one!”
50
The swineherd, when the quiet man sank down,
built a new pile of evergreens and fleeces—
a couch for the dear son of great Odysseus—
then gave them trenchers of good meat, left over
from the roast pork of yesterday, and heaped up
willow baskets full of bread, and mixed
an ivy bowl of honey-hearted wine.
Then he in turn sat down, facing Odysseus,
their hands went out upon the meat and drink
as they fell to, ridding themselves of hunger,
60
until Telémakhos paused and said:
“Oh, Uncle,
what’s your friend’s home port? How did he come?
Who were the sailors brought him here to Ithaka?
I doubt if he came walking on the sea.”
And you replied, Eumaios—O my swineherd—
“Son, the truth about him is soon told.
His home land, and a broad land, too, is Krete,
but he has knocked about the world, he says,
for years, as the Powers wove his life. Just now
he broke away from a shipload of Thesprotians
70
to reach my hut. I place him in your hands.
Act as you will. He wishes your protection.”
The young man said:
“Eumaios, my protection!
The notion cuts me to the heart. How can I
receive your friend at home? I am not old enough
or trained in arms. Could I defend myself
if someone picked a fight with me?
Besides,
mother is in a quandary, whether to stay with me
as mistress of our household, honoring
her lord’s bed, and opinion in the town,
80
or take the best Akhaian who comes her way—
the one who offers most.
I’ll undertake,
at all events, to clothe your friend for winter,
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Sixteen
477
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 477
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
cut pages from pdf online; delete blank page from pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete page from pdf
now he is with you. Tunic and cloak of wool,
a good broadsword, and sandals—these are his.
I can arrange to send him where he likes
or you may keep him in your cabin here.
I shall have bread and wine sent up; you need not
feel any pinch on his behalf.
Impossible
to let him stay in hall, among the suitors.
90
They are drunk, drunk on impudence, they might
injure my guest—and how could I bear that?
How could a single man take on those odds?
Not even a hero could.
The suitors are too strong.”
At this the noble and enduring man, Odysseus,
addressed his son:
“Kind prince, it may be fitting
for me to speak a word. All that you say
gives me an inward wound as I sit listening.
I mean this wanton game they play, these fellows,
riding roughshod over you in your own house,
100
admirable as you are. But tell me,
are you resigned to being bled? The townsmen,
stirred up against you, are they, by some oracle?
Your brothers—can you say your brothers fail you?
A man should feel his kin, at least, behind him
in any clash, when a real fight is coming.
If my heart were as young as yours, if I were
son to Odysseus, or the man himself,
I’d rather have my head cut from my shoulders
by some slashing adversary, if I
110
brought no hurt upon that crew! Suppose
I went down, being alone, before the lot,
better, I say, to die at home in battle
than see these insupportable things, day after
day the stranger cuffed, the women slaves
dragged here and there, shame in the lovely rooms,
the wine drunk up in rivers, sheer waste
of pointless feasting, never at an end!”
Telémakhos replied:
“Friend, I’ll explain to you.
There is no rancor in the town against me,
120
no fault of brothers, whom a man should feel
behind him when a fight is in the making;
no, no—in our family the First Born
of Heaven, Zeus, made single sons the rule.
Arkeísios had but one, Laërtês; he 
in turn fathered only one, Odysseus,
478
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 478
who left me in his hall alone, too young
to be of any use to him.
And so you see why enemies fill our house
in these days: all the princes of the islands,
130
Doulíkhion, Samê, wooded Zak´ynthos,
Ithaka, too—lords of our island rock—
eating our house up as they court my mother.
She cannot put an end to it; she dare not
bar the marriage that she hates; and they
devour all my substance and my cattle,
and who knows when they’ll slaughter me as well?
It rests upon the gods’ great knees.
Uncle,
go down at once and tell the Lady Penélopê
that I am back from Pylos, safe and sound.
140
I stay here meanwhile. You will give your message
and then return. Let none of the Akhaians
hear it; they have a mind to do me harm.”
To this, Eumaios, you replied:
“I know.
But make this clear, now—should I not likewise
call on Laërtês with your news? Hard hit
by sorrow though he was, mourning Odysseus,
he used to keep an eye upon his farm.
He had what meals he pleased, with his own folk.
But now no more, not since you sailed for Pylos;
150
he has not taken food or drink, I hear,
sitting all day, blind to the work of harvest,
groaning, while the skin shrinks on his bones.”
Telémakhos answered:
“One more misery,
but we had better leave it so.
If men choose, and have their choice, in everything,
we’d have my father home.
Turn back
when you have done your errand, as you must,
not to be caught alone in the countryside.
But wait—you may tell Mother
160
to send our old housekeeper on the quiet
and quickly; she can tell the news to Grandfather.”
The swineherd, roused, reached out to get his sandals,
tied them on, and took the road.
Who else
beheld this but Athena? From the air
she walked, taking the form of a tall woman,
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Sixteen
479
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 479
handsome and clever at her craft, and stood
beyond the gate in plain sight of Odysseus,
unseen, though, by Telémakhos, unguessed,
for not to everyone will gods appear.
170
Odysseus noticed her; so did the dogs,
who cowered whimpering away from her. She only
nodded, signing to him with her brows,
a sign he recognized. Crossing the yard,
he passed out through the gate in the stockade
to face the goddess. There she said to him:
“Son of Laërtês and the gods of old,
Odysseus, master of land ways and sea ways,
dissemble to your son no longer now.
The time has come: tell him how you together
180
will bring doom on the suitors in the town.
I shall not be far distant then, for I
myself desire battle.”
Saying no more,
she tipped her golden wand upon the man,
making his cloak pure white, and the knit tunic
fresh around him. Lithe and young she made him,
ruddy with sun, his jawline clean, the beard
no longer grey upon his chin. And she
withdrew when she had done.
Then Lord Odysseus
reappeared—and his son was thunderstruck.
190
Fear in his eyes, he looked down and away
as though it were a god, and whispered:
“Stranger,
you are no longer what you were just now!
Your cloak is new; even your skin! You are
one of the gods who rule the sweep of heaven!
Be kind to us, we’ll make you fair oblation
and gifts of hammered gold. Have mercy on us!”
The noble and enduring man replied:
“No god. Why take me for a god? No, no.
I am that father whom your boyhood lacked
200
and suffered pain for lack of. I am he.”
Held back too long, the tears ran down his cheeks
as he embraced his son.
Only Telémakhos,
uncomprehending, wild
with incredulity, cried out:
480
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 480
“You cannot
be my father Odysseus! Meddling spirits
conceived this trick to twist the knife in me!
No man of woman born could work these wonders
by his own craft, unless a god came into it
with ease to turn him young or old at will.
210
I swear you were in rags and old,
and here you stand like one of the immortals!”
Odysseus brought his ranging mind to bear
and said:
“This is not princely, to be swept
away by wonder at your father’s presence.
No other Odysseus will ever come,
for he and I are one, the same; his bitter
fortune and his wanderings are mine.
Twenty years gone, and I am back again
on my own island.
As for my change of skin,
220
that is a charm Athena, Hope of Soldiers,
uses as she will; she has the knack
to make me seem a beggar man sometimes
and sometimes young, with finer clothes about me.
It is no hard thing for the gods of heaven
to glorify a man or bring him low.”
When he had spoken, down he sat.
Then, throwing
his arms around this marvel of a father
Telémakhos began to weep. Salt tears
rose from the wells of longing in both men,
230
and cries burst from both as keen and fluttering
as those of the great taloned hawk,
whose nestlings farmers take before they fly.
So helplessly they cried, pouring out tears,
and might have gone on weeping so till sundown,
had not Telémakhos said:
“Dear father! Tell me
what kind of vessel put you here ashore
on Ithaka? Your sailors, who were they?
I doubt you made it, walking on the sea!”
Then said Odysseus, who had borne the barren sea:
240
“Only plain truth shall I tell you, child.
Great seafarers, the Phaiákians, gave me passage
as they give other wanderers. By night
over the open ocean, while I slept,
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Sixteen
481
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 481
they brought me in their cutter, set me down
on Ithaka, with gifts of bronze and gold
and stores of woven things. By the gods’ will
these lie all hidden in a cave. I came
to this wild place, directed by Athena,
so that we might lay plans to kill our enemies.
250
Count up the suitors for me, let me know
what men at arms are there, how many men.
I must put all my mind to it, to see
if we two by ourselves can take them on
or if we should look round for help.”
Telémakhos
replied:
“O Father, all my life your fame
as a fighting man has echoed in my ears—
your skills with weapons and the tricks of war—
but what you speak of is a staggering thing,
beyond imagining, for me. How can two men
260
do battle with a houseful in their prime?
For I must tell you this is no affair
of ten or even twice ten men, but scores,
throngs of them. You shall see, here and now.
The number from Doulíkhion alone
is fifty-two, picked men, with armorers,
a half dozen; twenty-four came from Samê,
twenty from Zak´ynthos; our own island
accounts for twelve, high-ranked, and their retainers,
Medôn the crier, and the Master Harper
270
besides a pair of handymen at feasts.
If we go in against all these
I fear we pay in salt blood for your vengeance.
You must think hard if you would conjure up
the fighting strength to take us through.”
Odysseus
who had endured the long war and the sea
answered:
“I’ll tell you now.
Suppose Athena’s arm is over us, and Zeus
her father’s, must I rack my brains for more?”
Clearheaded Telémakhos looked hard and said:
280
“Those two are great defenders, no one doubts it,
but throned in the serene clouds overhead;
other affairs of men and gods they have
to rule over.”
482
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 482
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested