c# open a pdf file : Delete pages pdf preview application software cloud windows html winforms class The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation21-part1248

And the hero answered:
“Before long they will stand to right and left of us
in combat, in the shouting, when the test comes—
our nerve against the suitors’ in my hall.
Here is your part: at break of day tomorrow
home with you, go mingle with our princes.
The swineherd later on will take me down
290
the port-side trail—a beggar, by my looks,
hangdog and old. If they make fun of me
in my own courtyard, let your ribs cage up
your springing heart, no matter what I suffer,
no matter if they pull me by the heels
or practice shots at me, to drive me out.
Look on, hold down your anger. You may even
plead with them, by heaven! in gentle terms
to quit their horseplay—not that they will heed you,
rash as they are, facing their day of wrath.
300
Now fix the next step in your mind.
Athena,
counseling me, will give me word, and I
shall signal to you, nodding: at that point
round up all armor, lances, gear of war
left in our hall, and stow the lot away
back in the vaulted store room. When the suitors
miss those arms and question you, be soft
in what you say: answer:
‘I thought I’d move them
out of the smoke. They seemed no longer those
bright arms Odysseus left us years ago
310
when he went off to Troy. Here where the fire’s
hot breath came, they had grown black and drear.
One better reason, too, I had from Zeus:
suppose a brawl starts up when you are drunk,
you might be crazed and bloody one another,
and that would stain your feast, your courtship. Tempered
iron can magnetize a man.’
Say that.
But put aside two broadswords and two spears
for our own use, two oxhide shields nearby
when we go into action. Pallas Athena
320
and Zeus All Provident will see you through,
bemusing our young friends.
Now one thing more.
If son of mine you are and blood of mine,
let no one hear Odysseus is about.
Neither Laërtês, nor the swineherd here,
nor any slave, nor even Penélopê.
But you and I alone must learn how far
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Sixteen
483
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 483
Delete pages pdf preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from a pdf; delete page from pdf acrobat
Delete pages pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf online; delete page in pdf document
the women are corrupted; we should know
how to locate good men among our hands,
the loyal and respectful, and the shirkers
330
who take you lightly, as alone and young.”
His admirable son replied:
“Ah, Father,
even when danger comes I think you’ll find
courage in me. I am not scatterbrained.
But as to checking on the field hands now,
I see no gain for us in that. Reflect,
you make a long toil, that way, if you care
to look men in the eye at every farm,
while these gay devils in our hall at ease
eat up our flocks and herds, leaving us nothing.
340
As for the maids I say, Yes: make distinction
between good girls and those who shame your house;
all that I shy away from is a scrutiny
of cottagers just now. The time for that
comes later—if in truth you have a sign
from Zeus the Stormking.”
So their talk ran on,
while down the coast, and round toward Ithaka,
hove the good ship that had gone out to Pylos
bearing Telémakhos and his companions.
Into the wide bay waters, on to the dark land,
350
they drove her, hauled her up, took out the oars
and the canvas for light-hearted squires to carry
homeward—as they carried, too, the gifts
of Meneláos round to Kl´ytios’1 house.
But first they sped a runner to Penélopê.
They knew that quiet lady must be told
the prince her son had come ashore, and sent
his good ship round to port; not one soft tear
should their sweet queen let fall.
Both messengers,
crewman and swineherd—reached the outer gate
360
in the same instant, bearing the same news,
and went in side by side to the king’s hall.
He of the ship burst out among the maids:
“Your son’s ashore this morning, O my Queen!”
1
Father of the trusty Peiraios; see the end of Book XV.
484
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 484
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete pages from a pdf file; delete a page from a pdf in preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete pages of pdf
But the swineherd calmly stood near Penélopê
whispering what her son had bade him tell
and what he had enjoined on her. No more.
When he had done, he left the place and turned
back to his steading in the hills.
By now,
sullen confusion weighed upon the suitors.
370
Out of the house, out of the court they went,
beyond the wall and gate, to sit in council.
Eur´ymakhos, the son of Pólybos,
opened discussion:
“Friends, face up to it;
that young pup, Telémakhos, has done it;
he made the round trip, though we said he could not.
Well—now to get the best craft we can find
afloat, with oarsmen who can drench her bows,
and tell those on the island to come home.”
He was yet speaking when Amphínomos,
380
craning seaward, spotted the picket ship
already in the roadstead under oars
with canvas brailed up; and this fresh arrival
made him chuckle. Then he told his friends:
“Too late for messages. Look, here they come
along the bay. Some god has brought them news,
or else they saw the cutter pass—and could not
overtake her.”
On their feet at once,
the suitors took the road to the sea beach,
where, meeting the black ship, they hauled her in.
390
Oars and gear they left for their light-hearted
squires to carry, and all in company
made off for the assembly ground. All others,
young and old alike, they barred from sitting.
Eupeithês’ son, Antínoös, made the speech:
“How the gods let our man escape a boarding,
that is the wonder.
We had lookouts posted
up on the heights all day in the sea wind,
and every hour a fresh pair of eyes;
at night we never slept ashore
400
but after sundown cruised the open water
to the southeast, patrolling until Dawn.
We were prepared to cut him off and catch him,
squelch him for good and all. The power of heaven
steered him the long way home.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Sixteen
485
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 485
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
delete pages from a pdf online; add remove pages from pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
delete pages of pdf online; delete blank pages in pdf online
Well, let this company plan his destruction,
and leave him no way out, this time. I see
our business here unfinished while he lives.
He knows, now, and he’s no fool. Besides,
his people are all tired of playing up to us.
410
I say, act now, before he brings the whole
body of Akhaians to assembly—
and he would leave no word unsaid, in righteous
anger speaking out before them all
of how we plotted murder, and then missed him.
Will they commend us for that pretty work?
Take action now, or we are in for trouble;
we might be exiled, driven off our lands.
Let the first blow be ours.
If we move first, and get our hands on him
420
far from the city’s eye, on path or field,
then stores and livestock will be ours to share;
the house we may confer upon his mother—
and on the man who marries her. Decide
otherwise you may—but if, my friends,
you want that boy to live and have his patrimony,
then we should eat no more of his good mutton,
come to this place no more.
Let each from his own hall
court her with dower gifts. And let her marry
the destined one, the one who offers most.”
430
He ended, and no sound was heard among them,
sitting all hushed, until at last the son
of Nísos Aretíadês arose—
Amphínomos.
He led the group of suitors
who came from grainlands on Doulíkhion,
and he had lightness in his talk that pleased
Penélopê, for he meant no ill.
Now, in concern for them, he spoke:
“O Friends
I should not like to kill Telémakhos.
It is a shivery thing to kill a prince
440
of royal blood.
We should consult the gods.
If Zeus hands down a ruling for that act,
then I shall say, ‘Come one, come all,’ and go
cut him down with my own hand—
but I say Halt, if gods are contrary.”
Now this proposal won them, and it carried.
Breaking their session up, away they went
to take their smooth chairs in Odysseus’ house.
486
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 486
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pdf page acrobat; cut pages out of pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
delete pages from pdf online; delete pages on pdf file
Meanwhile Penélopê the Wise,
decided, for her part, to make appearance
450
before the valiant young men.
She knew now
they plotted her child’s death in her own hall,
for once more Medôn, who had heard them, told her.
Into the hall that lovely lady came,
with maids attending, and approached the suitors,
till near a pillar of the well-wrought roof
she paused, her shining veil across her cheeks,
and spoke directly to Antínoös:
“Infatuate,
steeped in evil! Yet in Ithaka they say
you were the best one of your generation
460
in mind and speech. Not so, you never were.
Madman, why do you keep forever knitting
death for Telémakhos? Have you no piety
toward men dependent on another’s mercy?
Before Lord Zeus, no sanction can be found
for one such man to plot against another!
Or are you not aware that your own father
fled to us when the realm was up in arms
against him? He had joined the Taphian pirates
in ravaging Thesprotian folk, our friends.
470
Our people would have raided him, then—breached
his heart, butchered his herds to feast upon—
only Odysseus took him in, and held
the furious townsmen off. It is Odysseus’
house you now consume, his wife you court,
his son you kill, or try to kill. And me
you ravage now, and grieve. I call upon you
to make an end of it!—and your friends too!”
The son of Pólybos it was, Eur´ymakhos,
who answered her with ready speech:
“My lady
480
Penélopê, wise daughter of Ikários,
you must shake off these ugly thoughts. I say
that man does not exist, nor will, who dares
lay hands upon your son Telémakhos,
while I live, walk the earth, and use my eyes.
The man’s life blood, I swear,
will spurt and run out black around my lancehead!
For it is true of me, too, that Odysseus,
raiders of cities, took me on his knees
and fed me often—tidbits and red wine.
490
Should not Telémakhos, therefore, be dear to me
above the rest of men? I tell the lad
he must not tremble for his life, at least
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Sixteen
487
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 487
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete a page from a pdf; delete pages from a pdf in preview
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages from pdf document; delete blank page in pdf
alone in the suitors’ company. Heaven
deals death no man avoids.”
Blasphemous lies
in earnest tones he told—the one who planned
the lad’s destruction!
Silently the lady
made her way to her glowing upper chamber,
there to weep for her dear lord, Odysseus,
until grey-eyed Athena
500
cast sweet sleep upon her eyes.
At fall of dusk
Odysseus and his son heard the approach
of the good forester. They had been standing
over the fire with a spitted pig,
a yearling. And Athena coming near
with one rap of her wand made of Odysseus
an old old man again, with rags about him—
for if the swineherd knew his lord were there
he could not hold the news; Penélopê
would hear it from him.
Now Telémakhos
510
greeted him first:
“Eumaios, back again!
What was the talk in town? Are the tall suitors
home again, by this time, from their ambush,
or are they still on watch for my return?”
And you replied, Eumaios—O my swineherd:
“There was no time to ask or talk of that;
I hurried through the town. Even while I spoke
my message, I felt driven to return.
A runner from your friends turned up, a crier,
who gave the news first to your mother. Ah!
520
One thing I do know; with my own two eyes
I saw it. As I climbed above the town
to where the sky is cut by Hermês’ ridge,
I saw a ship bound in for our own bay
with many oarsmen in it, laden down
with sea provisioning and two-edged spears,
and I surmised those were the men.
Who knows?”
Telémakhos, now strong with magic, smiled
across at his own father—but avoided
the swineherd’s eye.
So when the pig was done,
530
the spit no longer to be turned, the table
garnished, everyone sat down to feast
488
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 488
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete page from pdf online; delete pages on pdf
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from PowerPoint in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
acrobat export pages from pdf; delete page from pdf reader
on all the savory flesh he craved. And when
they had put off desire for meat and drink,
they turned to bed and took the gift of sleep.
BOOK SEVENTEEN: THE BEGGAR AT THE MANOR
When the young Dawn came bright into the East
spreading her finger tips of rose, Telémakhos
the king’s son, tied on his rawhide sandals
and took the lance that bore his handgrip. Burning
to be away, and on the path to town,
he told the swineherd:
“Uncle, the truth is
I must go down myself into the city.
Mother must see me there, with her own eyes,
or she will weep and feel forsaken still,
and will not set her mind at rest. Your job
10
will be to lead this poor man down to beg.
Some householder may want to dole him out
a loaf and pint. I have my own troubles.
Am I to care for every last man who comes?
And if he takes it badly—well, so much
the worse for him. Plain truth is what I favor.”
At once Odysseus the great tactician
spoke up briskly:
“Neither would I myself
care to be kept here, lad. A beggar man
fares better in the town. Let it be said
20
I am not yet so old I must lay up
indoors and mumble, ‘Aye, Aye’ to a master.1
Go on, then. As you say, my friend can lead me
as soon as I have had a bit of fire
and when the sun grows warmer. These old rags
could be my death, outside on a frosty morning,
and the town is distant, so they say.”
Telémakhos
with no more words went out, and through the fence,
and down hill, going fast on the steep footing,
nursing woe for the suitors in his heart.
30
1
Odysseus means that he is not yet so old that he must remain in one place, subject to a
single master.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Seventeen
489
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 489
Before the manor hall, he leaned his lance
against a great porch pillar and stepped in
across the door stone.
Old Eur´ykleia
saw him first, for that day she was covering
handsome chairs nearby with clean fleeces.
She ran to him at once, tears in her eyes;
and other maidservants of the old soldier
Odysseus gathered round to greet their prince,
kissing his head and shoulders.
Quickly, then,
Penélopê the Wise, tall in her beauty
40
as Artemis or pale-gold Aphroditê,
appeared from her high chamber and came down
to throw her arms around her son. In tears
she kissed his head, kissed both his shining eyes,
then cried out, and her words flew:
“Back with me!
Telémakhos, more sweet to me than sunlight!
I thought I should not see you again, ever,
after you took the ship that night to Pylos—
against my will, with not a word! you went
for news of your dear father. Tell me now
50
of everything you saw!”
But he made answer:
“Mother, not now. You make me weep. My heart
already aches—I came near death at sea.
You must bathe, first of all, and change your dress,
and take your maids to the highest room to pray.
Pray, and burn offerings to the gods of heaven,
that Zeus may put his hand to our revenge.
I am off now to bring home from the square
a guest, a passenger I had. I sent him
yesterday with all my crew to town.
60
Peiraios was to care for him, I said,
and keep him well, with honor, till I came.”
She caught back the swift words upon her tongue.
Then softly she withdrew
to bathe and dress her body in fresh linen,
and make her offerings to the gods of heaven,
praying Almighty Zeus
to put his hand to their revenge.
Telémakhos
had left the hall, taken his lance, and gone
with two quick hounds at heel into the town,
70
490
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 490
Athena’s grace in his long stride
making the people gaze as he came near.
And suitors gathered, primed with friendly words,
despite the deadly plotting in their hearts—
but these, and all their crowd, he kept away from.
Next he saw sitting some way off, apart,
Mentor, with Antiphos and Halithersês,
friends of his father’s house in years gone by.
Near these men he sat down, and told his tale
under their questioning.
His crewman, young Peiraios,
80
guided through town, meanwhile, into the Square,
the Argive exile, Theokl´ymenos.
Telémakhos lost no time in moving toward him;
but first Peiraios had his say:
Telémakhos,
you must send maids to me, at once, and let me
turn over to you those gifts from Meneláos!”
The prince had pondered it, and said:
“Peiraios,
none of us knows how this affair will end.
Say one day our fine suitors, without warning,
draw upon me, kill me in our hall,
90
and parcel out my patrimony—I wish
you, and no one of them, to have those things.
But if my hour comes, if I can bring down
bloody death on all that crew,
you will rejoice to send my gifts to me—
and so will I rejoice!”
Then he departed,
leading his guest, the lonely stranger, home.
Over chair-backs in hall they dropped their mantles
and passed in to the polished tubs, where maids
poured out warm baths for them, anointed them,
100
and pulled fresh tunics, fleecy cloaks around them.
Soon they were seated at their ease in hall.
A maid came by to tip a golden jug
over their fingers into a silver bowl
and draw a gleaming table up beside them.
The larder mistress brought her tray of loaves
and savories, dispensing each.
In silence
across the hall, beside a pillar, propped
in a long chair, Telémakhos’ mother
spun a fine wool yarn.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Seventeen
491
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 491
The young men’s hands
110
went out upon the good things placed before them,
and only when their hunger and thirst were gone
did she look up and say:
“Telémakhos,
what am I to do now? Return alone
and lie again on my forsaken bed—
sodden how often with my weeping
since that day when Odysseus put to sea
to join the Atreidai2 before Troy?
Could you not
tell me, before the suitors fill our house,
what news you have of his return?”
He answered:
120
“Now that you ask a second time, dear Mother,
here is the truth.
We went ashore at Pylos
to Nestor, lord and guardian of the West,
who gave me welcome in his towering hall.
So kind he was, he might have been my father
and I his long-lost son—so truly kind,
taking me in with his own honored sons.
But as to Odysseus’ bitter fate,
living or dead, he had no news at all
from anyone on earth, he said. He sent me
130
overland in a strong chariot
to Atreus’ son, the captain, Meneláos.
And I saw Helen there, for whom the Argives
fought, and the Trojans fought, as the gods willed.
Then Meneláos of the great war cry
asked me my errand in that ancient land
of Lakedaimon. So I told our story,
and in reply he burst out:
3
‘Intolerable!
That feeble men, unfit as those men are,
should think to lie in that great captain’s bed,
140
fawns in the lion’s lair! As if a doe
put down her litter of sucklings there, while she
sniffed at the glen or grazed a grassy hollow.
Ha! Then the lord returns to his own bed
and deals out wretched doom on both alike.
So will Odysseus deal out doom on these.
O Father Zeus, Athena, and Apollo!
I pray he comes as once he was, in Lesbos,
2
Sons of Atreus—Agamémnon and Meneláos.
3
The following quotation of Meneláos’ words summarizes his narrative in Book IV.
492
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 492
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested